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shirley
8th June 2009, 06:54 PM
Hi everybody,
I have been asked to write an article in our club newsletter about setting up a photography website and it set me thinking about the reasons why people set up sites.
For me it is a way of sharing my pics and my photography news with people who may be interested and otherwise may not get to see my work e.g. friends who live a distance away.
However I suspect there are a whole range of other reasons and I thought it would be interesting to find out why others have set up their website.
So if you have a website would you be willing to share your reasons for doing it?
Thanks
Shirley

eunosben
8th June 2009, 06:59 PM
I also do mine to share my photography with anyone thats interested ie family colleagues etc

snaarman
8th June 2009, 09:41 PM
Well, I do it to show off *yes

OK, truthfully? Maybe one day if I live long enough to retire* I might make a proper photographer of myself, and the website would be a good starting place..

Pete

* lets face it, I'm going to need some sort of income when I retire, judging by the way pension funds are falling

Nick Temple-Fry
8th June 2009, 10:25 PM
Well vanity mainly.

Unless you are lucky to have a lot of links from other sites it's pointless to expect much in the way of traffic.

But there is also a satisfaction in building/maintaining a site.

And just occaisionally someone will say that they have enjoyed it - unsolicited and unexpected - a welcome boost.

Nick

theMusicMan
9th June 2009, 06:24 AM
Hi Shirley

Some reasons for me are;

1 - to allow the family we have who are abroad to view images of our kids and days out.
2 - to share images I've taken with the likes of the good peeps here and people elsewhere
3 - for customers to view their images online outside of public areas of the site
4 - for anyone who may want to purchase images off my site (Zenfolio offers this)

Hope that helps.

benvendetta
9th June 2009, 12:53 PM
Setting up my own website is likely to be beyond me and that's why I have a PBase one.
Much more convenient IMO.

donmcmahan
9th June 2009, 09:03 PM
Hopefully someone will find my site and like my pictures. perhaps enough to buy one!http://donmcmahan.com Seriously anyone who has aspirations of doing any sort of business on the web had better learn all they can about search engine optimization. It is quite easy to set up a site, not so easy to get anyone to visit it, apart from spammers

DTD
10th June 2009, 08:47 AM
It's a way of letting people find me and my photographs mainly just post published stuff in themes to show a cross section of what I've done.

As well as a web site I more and more photographers are using social media as a good way of keeping in contact with others. So I also have a blog and flickrstream to show and get comments on a particular series I was working on. More recently I've started posting videos on Vimeo. Through the flickrstream and joining specific groups I got in contact with several people who helped my project.
Think I need to have a rethink about my website. Not too attracted at the moment to Twitter or FaceBook, though I have a few contacts who use them and have had traffic to my sites through being mentioned by them.

BTW I contributed a little column about websites in Olympus User a while back.

www.dunni.co.uk
www.flickr.com/photos/ddtv
http://daviddunnico.wordpress.com
www.vimeo.com/daviddunnico

Steve Lane
10th June 2009, 09:48 AM
I created mine initally because I fancied the technical challenges that come with website creation - in other words, it gave me something to do! Subject matter was secondary; I wanted to create a site but did not have a theme. I thought of a few things i.e. music, travel, archaeology, but photography was the obvious one, as it was something I could add to on a regular basis.

It is also an ideal way of sharing some of my images and allows me the flexibility to present them how I wish.

Cheers, Steve.

stevemerrick
10th June 2009, 12:27 PM
Heyah,

I wasn't that convinced that the internet (Or digital cameras) would take off the way they have, (Boy! did I get that wrong ;-) ) However the initial motivation I had for the website was to let Picture editors see something tangible before we met, its still the only motivation I have for it.

What with flickr and myspace, if you just want to show your work then you can, but having a little website to show your work does three things that flickr etc cannot. 1/ It confirms that you are real and have a history, 2/ it shows a degree of technical literacy that is beyond the quick photoshop tweaks, 3/ It is totally personal and under your control what you show and how you show it.

The other good point to a website is that if you write the dialog and info yourself, then most people have a pretty good idea what they are dealing with.

So sadly my reasons for having the website are utterly mercenary...


Cheers
Steve ;-)

250swb
10th June 2009, 03:38 PM
If anybody is considering making a website and feels nervous about it I would recommend Clikpic....

http://www.clikpic.com/

....who do some very classy templates specifically for photographers and artists. It is all very easy indeed and a professional look is almost guaranteed. If you have all your images sized and ready you could have your website up within a day. Also very easy to add to and alter once it is up.

Steve

this is my work website using Clikpic

www.stevebarnettmodelcars.com

Jonesgj
10th June 2009, 10:02 PM
Like someone else mentions, its the challenge not the actual content.

I started mine many years ago when I was new to web programming to advertise my SQL and other programming skills. It has now evolved into just something I have, and works well to show off a few photos. Instead of a raw, hand crafted HTML/script/data-driven solution I use a wysiwyg tool (as Martin Rushent said, "If I want to drive a nail into a piece of wood I use a hammer not my fist") I'm too old to squint at a screen until the early hours trying to find a silly syntax error, even though the screens are a lot bigger today.
Where was I? Oh yes... so like many others on here I'm sure its just the technical challenge.

Kind regards

Graydon

HughofBardfield
11th June 2009, 01:50 PM
I'd be interested to know if anyone thinks there are advantages to having a website rather than an account with Flickr or one of the other photo-sharing sites (unless you want to sell your images, of course).

I find Flickr meets my needs, and gets my photos seen by a much wider audience than would probably find a stand-alone website. The "social" interaction is probably the best bit - especially if you're stuck in a home office for much of the day.

Dick Bowman
11th June 2009, 03:05 PM
Personally I go for the "my website" option rather than any of the sharing sites.

Partly that's because I was building collections of web pages long before these sharing sites existed - and it's pretty straightforward especially given a suitable HTML editor (used several, Kompozer most recently - the price is right). I'd imagine you could let it evolve toward "click to purchase" if you wanted - I have no ambitions in that direction, so no relevant experience. People seem to be deterred from building sites - I wonder whether there are vested interests doing some of the deterring.

I don't care for the "gosh willykins" flavour of a lot of these social sites - maybe that's something that comes from being an old git. Which also means that I remember mainframe timesharing and a consequent wish never to go near anything similar ever again. With my own website(s) all I'm doing is letting hosting sites have a copy of what I want to put up for public viewing - from time to time I just put the files somewhere new and close the old account.

But, as you imply, the downside is that stand-alone websites have a problem being found by search engines. Depends whether you need/want to be found by them, I guess.

Dogcow
17th July 2009, 02:17 PM
I did set up my own website as it is the only way to show my 360vr panorama pics to friends and relatives.
I am fairly new into 360 panoramas and i like taking them a lot. And the only way to show them is trough a dedicated website.

Trausti Hraunfjord
17th July 2009, 02:53 PM
Hi Dogcow (Karel?)

A fellow panographer! Actually it is possible to use panoramas on "public sites". Wordpress (http://wordpress.com/)is one, but one needs to use a plugin, and as far as I understand, it's only through flash based panoramas... but I may be wrong about that.

On your site, there are download links for QT and Flash... but I only find your panoramas in QT format. Do you have some panos in flash available?

Have you had some experience with Flash based panos?

_______________

Back on topic:

Having one's own website for one's own works, is the only way forward if one is involved in private business... or business at all. The "seriousness" of having one's site as "flicker" or "google groups" or "facebook" or some such, is of course not in the area of taking oneself seriously... so why would others?

A little over a year ago I was working on a pano project, posted a link to one of the panos in a forum, and it went like wildfire around the world, resulting in more than 3 million individual users visiting that single panorama in the following 7 months. For me it proves that if the content of a site is interesting, people will visit. Regardless of it being private or not, advertized professionally or not. Word of mouth and visually interesting things are still valid as the best tools for publicity.

If I get a link to watch something on a privately owned site, and another link to a "social networked" site, I will go for the private site every time. I simply don't like entering sites like facebook or hi5 or myspace or flicker or tweet and all the other copycat sites. These are as impersonal as they can get... another account there, is like another grain of sand on the beach. No one will notice it at all.

So my path is clear: I have my own domains (several), the oldest one dating back 8 or so years... and that's how things will work for me in the future. I have complete control over the content I provide, and that's how it should be.

Dogcow
17th July 2009, 03:11 PM
On your site, there are download links for QT and Flash... but I only find your panoramas in QT format. Do you have some panos in flash available?


Yes, actually all the panoramas on the site are available in both QT and Flash. Clicking a panorama invokes a Javascript which detects the installation of QT on your computer. If QT is available the panorama is presented in QT otherwise in Flash.
You can manually see the Flash and not the QT on my site by clicking on a panorama and in the URL add _swf just before .html


Karel

Trausti Hraunfjord
17th July 2009, 03:29 PM
Ah. Thank you for the info.

Personally, I try to avoid QT panos if at all possible. The quality of movement/interaction is nowhere close to flash based panoramas (the good players), and that is sad, considering that QT used to be the best viewer for panos ... years ago. Since then, nothing has been put into the development, in order to make things better.

One issue is of course the download package for people. QT is well over 20 mb, and is not a simple silent installation, while installing flash is done in seconds, and is less than 2 mb.

Pano2VR offers quite an ok visual quality, but is limited in functionalities/customization if one wants to offer commercial projects.

Have you tried FPP (http://flashpanoramas.com/player)yet?

jonesy
17th July 2009, 03:35 PM
OK to tag onto this one

My website I did for a number of reasons.

1. I'd done the OU courses which covered HTML and Javascript and I thought it would be good to put it to some use, and develop the skills still further.
2. I had an idea that was slightly different that I hoped that would take off and be both interesting and educational.
3. The website I co-own isnt all about MY photographs, its about mine and other peoples photographs and how places change over time, sharing images and information about people and places.

Dogcow
17th July 2009, 04:04 PM
Personally, I try to avoid QT panos if at all possible.

Yes, but as the majority of my friends and relatives (as wel as I am) are on a Mac, QT is the natural choice here. And as a matter of courtesy to the non-Apple visitors, I have added the Flash panos as well.... ;)

I will have a look at FPP, thanks.

Karel

Trausti Hraunfjord
17th July 2009, 05:40 PM
A large part of panographers are using Macs... simply because it's better. But also, well over 90% of them have gone completely over to flash based panoramas.

The world's most viewed panorama site http://panoramas.dk has gone away from the QT and over to FPP... and the owner of it is a dedicated Mac user.

I am still running on PC's, but at least I provided my programmer with Macs... so that things could be done properly.

Thank you for also thinking of non QT users, and you have some nice panos there.... and a good head (Nodal Ninja 5)... and a great camera :)

shenstone
17th July 2009, 08:29 PM
Hi everybody,
I have been asked to write an article in our club newsletter about setting up a photography website and it set me thinking about the reasons why people set up sites.
For me it is a way of sharing my pics and my photography news with people who may be interested and otherwise may not get to see my work e.g. friends who live a distance away.
However I suspect there are a whole range of other reasons and I thought it would be interesting to find out why others have set up their website.
So if you have a website would you be willing to share your reasons for doing it?
Thanks
Shirley

Why - Because I wanted to share pictures

Why not flickR etc - because I wanted control over the look and feel and a little more control over what people could do with the pictures as I've had some ripped of and wanted to take at least the most easy method (RHMouse/save as) away

How - I outlined that in a thread some time ago ...http://e-group.uk.net/forum/showthread.php?t=981

Regards
Andy

OlyPaul
18th July 2009, 04:30 PM
I started a pbase account in 2004, mainly I suppose for being able to post images in web forums without the hassle of having to use there own quirky galleries and proberbly if I'm honest for a certain amount of vanity in wanting to get my images seen and i like how you can tailor the pages how you want with some basic HTML.

I must be lucky because I do not interact much on it but get a fair amount of page views ( with flickr it tends to be you look at mine and i'll reciprocate way of life) but not on pbase.

In fact I thought pbases page statistics were bit suspect and proberly over exagerating , so added my own stat counter today at 12.30pm so far nearly 200 page views so I guess a few people are visiting.