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ndl0071
24th May 2009, 06:36 PM
With the speed of the E3...

the shot below of a Wood Pigeon (at least that's what I think it is!) was taken very much as a grab shot, lucky I had left the camera on All points 'C' focus, CW Metering, I literally had enough time to pick up the camera from a table to eye level quick pan,click and the bird was gone, I was really surprised that I managed to get off a shot.

The picture was taken this afternoon with the 50-200SWD at about 200yards, I know Oly claim that this is a quick combo, as far as I'm concerned here's the proof.

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/Wood_Pigeon.jpg

Because of the distance involved this is a crop.

Barr1e
24th May 2009, 10:07 PM
One of the better ones I've seen in flight for a while. t-up

Regards. Barr1e

PeterD
25th May 2009, 03:55 AM
Yes, the E3 is responsive - with the right lens attached! The 50-200 SWD, like the 12-60 SWD do focus fast on the E3.
Peter

michaelavis
25th May 2009, 08:23 AM
Yes, a great shot. I've neglected to think about metering settings when try to capture birds in flight, I've left it on ESP, I'll definitely try centre weighted next time. What do you tend to do with your AF pattern and IS settings for birds in flight?

ndl0071
25th May 2009, 03:34 PM
Hi Michael

Thanks for looking in, to answer your question the honest answer is that I have no idea, this shot was pure luck in so far as the settings seemed to work very well on this occasion:D I don't normally photo birds, let alone birds in flight.

The camera was set up with is1 on, (panning is better with is2!), I had continous focus on with all of the focus points active, CW metering.

I hope this helps, but I would suggest that you contact PererD, who is the resident forum expert in Birds in flight photography, I am sure he will be more than happy to point you in the right direction.

PeterD
25th May 2009, 04:16 PM
Hi Michael

Thanks for looking in, to answer your question the honest answer is that I have no idea, this shot was pure luck in so far as the settings seemed to work very well on this occasion:D I don't normally photo birds, let alone birds in flight.

The camera was set up with is1 on, (panning is better with is2!), I had continous focus on with all of the focus points active, CW metering.

I hope this helps, but I would suggest that you contact PererD, who is the resident forum expert in Birds in flight photography, I am sure he will be more than happy to point you in the right direction.

Thanks for the plug Neil. There are plenty of people on here who have mastered the art but I shall give a full reponse on my recomendations this evening. I am in the middle of preparing the evening meal so I am afraid I have to give this priority - four hungry mouths to feed (oh, and myself:))
Sorry for the delay Michael, I promise to give you a full set of recomendations about 8pm.

Cheers

Peter

PeterD
25th May 2009, 06:47 PM
Hi Michael

Thanks for looking in, to answer your question the honest answer is that I have no idea, this shot was pure luck in so far as the settings seemed to work very well on this occasion:D I don't normally photo birds, let alone birds in flight.

The camera was set up with is1 on, (panning is better with is2!), I had continous focus on with all of the focus points active, CW metering.

I hope this helps, but I would suggest that you contact PererD, who is the resident forum expert in Birds in flight photography, I am sure he will be more than happy to point you in the right direction.

Settings which I use for Birds in flight.

1. Focus - C-AF, 5 point focus targets. Select the option to ignore rapid changes of focus. See the Wrotniak article to set this.
2. Exposure - Centre weighted bias or ESP. Never centre spot mode as this can have dramatic effects frame/frame.
3. Shutter setting - Multi frame.
4. IS - Set to IS2 (I have used IS1 with little noticable problem but IS2 is recommended for panning shots.
5. Method - Half press shutter until the subject is in focus and then press all the way and track the subject.

Now another tip. Shooting birds in flight is usually an occasional and very often, a spontanious decision. Changing the camera settings manually just takes the flexibility away and you lose the opportunity before you are ready. Use the My Mode settings and apply your normal settings in MyMode1 and the birds in flight settings in MyMode2. Set the camera up to allow you to toggle between MyMode 1 and 2 using the Function button on the camera (again the Wrotniak article tells you how to do this). Now you are ready. When the opportunity arises, hold the Function key in with the right thumb and the camera is instantly set up for birds in flight. Release the Function key and you are back to your normal settings. Hope this helps. Any questions, please ask.

Reference: Wrotniak article at http://www.wrotniak.net/photo/43/e3-sett.html

PS Dinner went well too,

Peter

michaelavis
25th May 2009, 07:11 PM
Absolutely perfect guidance, thank you very much, I'm sure I wont be the only one out there trying this out over the coming days.

PeterD
25th May 2009, 07:16 PM
Absolutely perfect guidance, thank you very much, I'm sure I wont be the only one out there trying this out over the coming days.

Thank you Michael. Looking forward to hearing of your experiences.

Peter

ndl0071
26th May 2009, 09:03 AM
Hello Peter, that all looks like sound advice to me, when's the DVD coming out:D

PeterD
26th May 2009, 09:16 AM
Hello Peter, that all looks like sound advice to me, when's the DVD coming out:D

Thanks Neil. I hoped it would sound sensible and not garbled. Cheers

Peter

ndl0071
26th May 2009, 12:33 PM
Just got back from browsing in Whs, I see that this weeks AP has an article on how to capture birds in flight, might be useful to some:)