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Bo_Nydahl
15th November 2007, 12:46 PM
Already there are "stories" of focus issues with the E3.

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/readflat.asp?forum=1022&thread=25624190

This never happens with Canikon does it?

Please read the threads because they are beyond belief what do these people expect an AF camera to be able to lock focus on? Obviously never heard of taking control and thinking about what they are doing do they?

There that's better. I need a lie down now in a darkened room. Wonder if my E510 auto focus will work there?

Mike

veggiesosage
15th November 2007, 12:54 PM
Well, actually it did happen just recently with the Canon 1D Mk 111, although a number of reviews did seem to 'miss' the problem. And lo and behold there's been a recall.

Ian, any thoughts/experiences to report on this one?

Ian
15th November 2007, 02:52 PM
Well, actually it did happen just recently with the Canon 1D Mk 111, although a number of reviews did seem to 'miss' the problem. And lo and behold there's been a recall.

Ian, any thoughts/experiences to report on this one?

There are times when the E-3 can't lock - I haven't tried the different AF sensitivity settings yet, though. But most SLRs have such issues and it doesn't necessarily mean the light or contrast levels. I did an extreme low light test and the E-3 will lock onto a subject when the exposure was up to 40 seconds (ISO 100, f/5.6). The Canon EOS-40D managed to lock reliably up to 25 seconds and an E-510, 10 seconds.

Certainly sharp repeating patterns, as per the manual, are a problem with the E-3. My DxO Analyzer test target is basically an array of black circular dots and the E-3 doesn't focus reliably on that, while some other DSLRs will.

BUT when it comes to every day irregular and amorphous shapes and details, the E-3 is very reliable and also in very dark conditions, without the need for AF asist lighting.

If the conditions are quite challenging, their is a noticeable pause before the focus action takes place. With the 12-60 you do feel that the AF takes two or three steps (in one direction, not hunting) to make final focus lock, but it's actually quite a quick process overall.

Ian

Bo_Nydahl
15th November 2007, 03:32 PM
There are times when the E-3 can't lock

Exactly I'm sure there are. The point of my post was that our transatlantic cousins could barely have got their E3's out of the box and they focus on the first thing they see in a wintertime darkish room and start squealing "focus problems". If after a week the complaints persist then I may concede there is a problem but until then take photographs. Oh yea and the other thing, some of the first photos on that site........ISO3200.

Mike

esnapper73
15th November 2007, 06:35 PM
What IS the problem! some of us managed to get sharp focus MANUALLY before the days of AF, hope we have not ALL become a race of 'button pushers' although I do realise that we are now in the 'digital age'!:eek:

Ian
15th November 2007, 06:56 PM
What IS the problem! some of us managed to get sharp focus MANUALLY before the days of AF, hope we have not ALL become a race of 'button pushers' although I do realise that we are now in the 'digital age'!:eek:

Indeed - and the nice new manual focus feel of the SWD lenses will encourage more manual focusing.

Ian

PeterD
15th November 2007, 08:24 PM
I still have my Pentax Spotmatic SLR purchased in 1967. What I liked very much with this camera was the centre of the viewfinder had a fresnal lens. This was extremely usefull in ensuring sharp focus as it was only under these conditions that the image in th viewfinder became clear. Modern manual focus systems do not give you this sort of guidance and it is not always easy to ensure sharp focus manually.

By the way, I will not be using the Spotmatic again. Its been relegated to a valuable item for the archive.

Now when is that e3 coming...........

PeterD

emirpprime
15th November 2007, 09:56 PM
Indeed - and the nice new manual focus feel of the SWD lenses will encourage more manual focusing.

Ian


Not to mention the new VF! I always found the E1 a little dark when not in great light conditions to start with, and I wouldn't like to think about the E510 etc.

Phil


ps - many people like to complain, especially about the bits that are extremes and so not flawless. i think we all do from time to time. but some are obsessed. but some of us take pictures with our camera too ;)

Ian
15th November 2007, 10:51 PM
I still have my Pentax Spotmatic SLR purchased in 1967. What I liked very much with this camera was the centre of the viewfinder had a fresnal lens. This was extremely usefull in ensuring sharp focus as it was only under these conditions that the image in th viewfinder became clear. Modern manual focus systems do not give you this sort of guidance and it is not always easy to ensure sharp focus manually.

By the way, I will not be using the Spotmatic again. Its been relegated to a valuable item for the archive.

Now when is that e3 coming...........

PeterD

Peter, do you mean a microprism or split prism focusing aid?

Ian

Ian
15th November 2007, 10:53 PM
Not to mention the new VF! I always found the E1 a little dark when not in great light conditions to start with, and I wouldn't like to think about the E510 etc.

Phil


ps - many people like to complain, especially about the bits that are extremes and so not flawless. i think we all do from time to time. but some are obsessed. but some of us take pictures with our camera too ;)

I never felt the E-1 finder was dark, just a bit on the small side. The following Es had slightly smaller finders and the E-330's was a dimmer too as it shared light with the Mode A live view sensor, but I soon got used it.

Ian

PeterD
15th November 2007, 11:40 PM
Peter, do you mean a microprism or split prism focusing aid?

Ian

Ian,

Its like frosted glass which clears as focus is achieved. If was to guess, I'd say it was a microprism focussing aid.

PeterD