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View Full Version : Android Stock - yes/no


blu-by-u
26th April 2019, 04:59 AM
I am not a tech geek and I see these talk on Rooting and using Stock (whatever that is)

So what are the benefit of it all? Will my 5 year old 6" android pad work faster if I do it? Will a new Lollipop or Marshmallow or Nougat or Pie OS work faster? or will it work at all :eek:

Is it worth all that effort or just junk the thing?:(

shenstone
26th April 2019, 06:16 AM
Rooting is insertion of your own programs deep in the root of the operating system and is typically something only something you should consider with knowledge of what you are doing

Upgrades of version would be a stock activity. They can bring new function that is useful, they can speed things up or slow things down.

If you're considering junking it I would try upgrades but before that clear out any programs you don't use. That can bring the biggest benei

Regards
Andy

Wally
26th April 2019, 07:19 AM
Strangely enough, since I've been laid up this type of query is something I've been considering.

I have a small Atom powered netbook - a Packard Bell Dot 3 - that ended up being downgraded from Windows 7 to Windows 10. :mad:

Like Henry, I too am bamboozled with the geekspeek. :confused:

As Android seems to run fairly quickly on limited memory and, as opposed to a PC, limited HD space, I am in the same quandry.

My query is: Can an Android OS work on a PC? Better still, if anyone has been there and done it, a few pointers towards the do's and do nots would be appreciated. :tup

Naughty Nigel
26th April 2019, 07:48 AM
My query is: Can an Android OS work on a PC? Better still, if anyone has been there and done it, a few pointers towards the do's and do nots would be appreciated. :tup

I think it can. Isn't that what a Chromebook does?

For what its worth, the Apple Mac OS would also run perfectly well on a PC if Apple allowed it. That is where Hackintosh comes in. ;)

Equally, you could also run Windows on a Mac. *yes

Jim Ford
26th April 2019, 10:20 AM
You need to unlock the phone and gain root access before you can do anything to update a phone or tablet. You also need to install a custom 'Recovery'. I use 'Teamwin':

https://twrp.me/about/

Having done so there are many alternative ROMs you can install, most of them updated and maintained by an enthusiastic group of developers.

I've got 2 phones I've flashed with AospExtended - 'Pie':

https://www.aospextended.com/devices/pie

One phone is a 6 year old 1st generation Moto G that came with 'Lollipop'. The other is an Xioami Redmi Note 4.

It's quite satisfying to have an old model phone running the latest version of Android.

Jim

blu-by-u
27th April 2019, 02:26 AM
............

It's quite satisfying to have an old model phone running the latest version of Android.

Jim

Does it have any gains of an Old Hardware on new OS other than the pleasure of having it able to. :o

RobEW
27th April 2019, 06:42 AM
You need to unlock the phone and gain root access before you can do anything to update a phone or tablet. You also need to install a custom 'Recovery'. I use 'Teamwin':

https://twrp.me/about/

Having done so there are many alternative ROMs you can install, most of them updated and maintained by an enthusiastic group of developers.

I've got 2 phones I've flashed with AospExtended - 'Pie':

https://www.aospextended.com/devices/pie

One phone is a 6 year old 1st generation Moto G that came with 'Lollipop'. The other is an Xioami Redmi Note 4.

It's quite satisfying to have an old model phone running the latest version of Android.

Jim

Funny. I had an old MOTO G 4G with Android "kit-kat", and resisted pressure to upgrade to "lollipop" in the grounds that I knew others who had done so had found it made the phone grind to a halt. I'm a bit wary of the treadmill of upgrades imposed on us increasingly by software vendors.

Jim Ford
27th April 2019, 07:57 AM
Does it have any gains of an Old Hardware on new OS other than the pleasure of having it able to. :o

You get the latest 'bells and whistles' that Pie offers - full gesture mode, screen orientation select and others that I can't recall. You can also have 'Magisk' installed that offers lots of useful 'tweaks', including 'Cloudfare' DNS:

https://forum.xda-developers.com/apps/magisk/official-magisk-v7-universal-systemless-t3473445

Jim

Jax
27th April 2019, 09:19 AM
Life would be positively intolerable without having all the latest bells, whistles and tweaks on your phone :D

Jax

pdk42
27th April 2019, 09:30 AM
For an OS to work on a particular bit of kit (tablet, PC, phone, whatever) you'll need two things:

- The OS will need to have been compiled (turned into binary machine code from the original programming text) for the CPU in question. PCs use Intel x86 architecture whilst phones and tablets generally use ARM RISC architecture. The machine code between them is totally different. Windows is generally compiled for x86 and Android is generally compiled for ARM. Windows ARM and x86 Android versions are available, but they are for specialised uses and you'll need to be fairly technically-savvy to use them (e.g. Windows 10 IoT for Raspberry Pi and Android RemixOS for PC).

- Low-level drivers will be needed that support the various hardware features of the device. By "hardware features" I mean the bits of circuitry that do things like drive the screen, the Wi-Fi adapter, the Bluetooth adapter, the sound generator, the microphone, the camera, the g-sensor, battery monitor etc. Whilst there is often a "de facto" standard for these things, there is no guarantee that they are the same across every device you come across.

There are generally two approaches to handling this hardware variation:

- The OS is clever enough to identify the bits of hardware and find the relevant drivers (on-line, local disk etc) and install them. This is the strategy that Windows uses. It relies on the very basic devices (screen, keyboard) being standard-enough to get the OS up-and-running in the first place. Thankfully, the vestiges of the standard from the very early "IBM PC" days are still there so this is usually the case.

- The OS is built specifically for the device in question and will include drivers for the hardware on the device. This is the approach that Android takes.

So, for Android, you'll need a specific OS build for a particular device. You'll need to find a source of the OS that's been specifically built (and tested!) for the device you have. There are sources of such things and I've done it myself in the past with a HTC phone of some sort (forget the model exactly now). HTC had long given up providing updates and I wanted some of the new features in later OS versions. I found a build of Android that supported the device (I think from the XDA developers forum) and installed it. It mostly worked, but it wasn't perfect.

Installing a new Android OS (a variant of Linux) will require you to get past the standard boot process and obtain superuser permissions (so called "root" access - hence the term "rooting the device"). This varies by device since you'll need to override whatever code/scripts are installed in the ROM of the device. It's quite possible to completely screw up your device if you get this wrong, so be careful! However, don't be totally awed by it since you can find detailed instructions for the popular devices and it's something that many people do quite safely.

Running Android on a PC is a much more complex topic. As I mentioned above, you'll need an x86 build of Android - e.g. Remix OS. I've not done this personally and I suspect that there will be gaps in availability of drivers for specific hardware features, so it'll need a lot of experimentation. Not recommended, except perhaps as a "live CD" bootable USB drive.

Wally
27th April 2019, 10:41 AM
For an OS to work on a particular bit of kit (tablet, PC, phone, whatever) you'll need two things:

--> Running Android on a PC is a much more complex topic. As I mentioned above, you'll need an x86 build of Android - e.g. Remix OS. I've not done this personally and I suspect that there will be gaps in availability of drivers for specific hardware features, so it'll need a lot of experimentation. Not recommended, except perhaps as a "live CD" bootable USB drive.


:tup Thanks Paul, a very interesting post. The last part was where I started to run aground. It seems I may be lucky as one link I stumbled across did mention OS/CPU issues. As luck woulld have it, my intended sacrificial lamb has an Intel Atom CPU which was recommended as the CPU of choice.

All that's left now... is to bite the bullet :eek:.

Come Xmas, I might need to ask Santa for two new front teeth. ;)

blu-by-u
29th April 2019, 03:46 AM
Santa, pls bring give me 4 front teeth. I broke mine :(