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Naughty Nigel
10th April 2019, 12:18 PM
Researchers at Oxford University have discovered a new chemical element with the greatest density yet known to science.

The new element, Governmentium (symbol=Gv) has one neutron, 25 assistant neutrons, 88 deputy neutrons and 198 assistant deputy neutrons, giving it an atomic mass of 312.

These 312 particles are held together by forces called morons, which are surrounded by vast quantities of lepton-like particles called pillocks.

Since Governmentium has no electrons, it is inert. However, it can be detected because it impedes every reaction with which it comes into contact.

A tiny amount of Governmentium can cause a reaction that would normally take less than a second to take from 4 days to 4 years to complete.

Governmentium has a normal half-life of 2 to 6 years. It does not decay, but instead undergoes a reorganisation in which a portion of the assistant neutrons and deputy neutrons exchange places. In fact, Governmentium's mass will actually increase over time, since each reorganisation will cause more morons to become neutrons, forming isomers.

This characteristic of moron promotion leads some scientists to believe that Governmentium is formed whenever morons reach a critical concentration.
This hypothetical quantity is referred to as a critical morass.

When catalysed with money, Governmentium becomes Administratium (symbol=Ad), an element that radiates just as much energy as Governmentium, since it has half as many pillocks but twice as many morons.

TimP
10th April 2019, 12:57 PM
I can imagine a coming together of Ad and Gv would produce another new element, Bolloxium (Bx)

Otto
10th April 2019, 01:30 PM
Reminds me of the very wonderful Les Barker's poem "Administerium and the Science of Unclear Physics" which unfortunately is not available on-line but you can hear it read by Heinz Wolff:

https://youtu.be/Pc09OLF53Jo

pdk42
10th April 2019, 01:51 PM
Excellent.

Naughty Nigel
10th April 2019, 02:07 PM
I can imagine a coming together of Ad and Gv would produce another new element, Bolloxium (Bx)

There are several isomers of Bolloxium, characterised by their distinctive red, blue, yellow and green colours. These are generally inert and do very little of value.

However if Bolloxium is reacted with hydrogen at elevated temperatures it will decompose into Dup which is bright orange in colour. DuP is highly reactive and likely to explode if brought into contact with the red, yellow or green isomers above. Stability with the blue isomer is only guaranteed on payment of large sums of money.

Best results are achieved if Bolloxium is heated in a furnace powered by wood pellets for which tax rebates are available.

Ricoh
10th April 2019, 02:21 PM
Since you’re all talking scientific, what about this:

https://physicsworld.com/a/first-images-of-a-black-hole-unveiled-by-astronomers-in-landmark-discovery/

Apparently the image was taken using the EM1 Mk2 with a bloody long lens.

Otto
10th April 2019, 02:47 PM
"A one-way door out of our universe".

I can think of a few uses for that!

Graham_of_Rainham
10th April 2019, 03:00 PM
Since it is said that light doesn’t come out of a black hole and photography is about capture of light, there’s something of a dichotomy in all of this... :confused:

Phill D
10th April 2019, 03:01 PM
This has the makings of a classic thread. Well started Nigel, brilliant *yes*yes

Naughty Nigel
10th April 2019, 03:13 PM
Since you’re all talking scientific, what about this:

https://physicsworld.com/a/first-images-of-a-black-hole-unveiled-by-astronomers-in-landmark-discovery/

Apparently the image was taken using the EM1 Mk2 with a bloody long lens.

You are sounding like Michael Cain there Steve. *yes

Otto
10th April 2019, 03:15 PM
Since it is said that light doesn’t come out of a black hole and photography is about capture of light, there’s something of a dichotomy in all of this... :confused:


As I understand it the radiation captured was not visible light but radio waves so this image is computer-generated. Nothing can escape from a black hole but if I remember correctly radiation is emitted when things fall into it, so that would be what the telescope array is imaging. It's clever stuff anyway, and made possible by a collaboration across many nations. Needless to say, the wags are already suggesting that Brexit might be at the centre of the hole :D.

Otto
10th April 2019, 03:21 PM
This has the makings of a classic thread. Well started Nigel, brilliant *yes*yes


Yes, it could go anywhere from here! A bit of (ahem) light relief anyway *chr.

Naughty Nigel
10th April 2019, 04:57 PM
Needless to say, the wags are already suggesting that Brexit might be at the centre of the hole :D.

Nah. That'll be the MP's Expenses Office. *yes

Ricoh
10th April 2019, 08:35 PM
Since it is said that light doesn’t come out of a black hole and photography is about capture of light, there’s something of a dichotomy in all of this... :confused:
Hawking radiation :)

Ricoh
10th April 2019, 08:40 PM
As I understand it the radiation captured was not visible light but radio waves so this image is computer-generated. Nothing can escape from a black hole but if I remember correctly radiation is emitted when things fall into it, so that would be what the telescope array is imaging. It's clever stuff anyway, and made possible by a collaboration across many nations. Needless to say, the wags are already suggesting that Brexit might be at the centre of the hole :D.
Imaged in the microwave wavelength, apparently.
Some clever thinking by Stephen Hawking; his postulate states black holes 'evaporate'. At the very small, quantum uncertainty takes hold, something like that. I'll have to google it to remind myself.

Ricoh
10th April 2019, 08:43 PM
You are sounding like Michael Cain there Steve. *yes
Lol

(I'll type some random stuff to make up 10 letter/characters or more.)

Graham_of_Rainham
10th April 2019, 08:53 PM
Hang on a minute, if there’s anything of quantum uncertainty involved, there’s always the possibility that it’s Schrödinger cat winking at us...

Jim Ford
10th April 2019, 09:23 PM
There was a scientist this evening that said that the recent imaging of a black hole 'made it tangible'. Tangible means that it's perceptible by touch. Now if there's just one thing in The Universe that you simply cannot touch - it's a black hole!

Jim

Ricoh
10th April 2019, 09:29 PM
Hang on a minute, if there’s anything of quantum uncertainty involved, there’s always the possibility that it’s Schrödinger cat winking at us...
That's only half the story since Schrödinger's cat might be dead.

Another solution states reality splits, so one version of the cat is dead and the other version of the same cat is alive, with kittens possibly.

Ricoh
10th April 2019, 09:32 PM
There was a scientist this evening that said that the recent imaging of a black hole 'made it tangible'. Tangible means that it's perceptible by touch. Now if there's just one thing in The Universe that you simply cannot touch - it's a black hole!

Jim
Oh I don't know about that. I firmly believe it's possible to touch a black hole ---- but not for long.

Graham_of_Rainham
11th April 2019, 08:28 AM
“So what is it”:

https://youtu.be/TxWN8AhNER0

Phill D
11th April 2019, 08:44 AM
Excellent Graham well remembered.

Otto
11th April 2019, 09:54 AM
Reminds me again of Les Barker, and his poem "Deja Vu". "It is impossible to experience deja vu for the first time ..."

https://youtu.be/UgBywHgfQf8

Ricoh
11th April 2019, 01:58 PM
Oh I don't know about that. I firmly believe it's possible to touch a black hole ---- but not for long.

Wow, hang on!! The passage of time slows in the presence of a strong gravitational field. Theory has it that time stops in the grips of a black hole. So you can touch it, if you consider a matter transformation, and touch it for a very long time indeed! But all this needs to be considered in 'frames of reference', of course.

Naughty Nigel
11th April 2019, 02:06 PM
Wow, hang on!! The passage of time slows in the presence of a strong gravitational field. Theory has it that time stops in the grips of a black hole. So you can touch it, if you consider a matter transformation, and touch it for a very long time indeed! But all this needs to be considered in 'frames of reference', of course.

Are there any 'red lines' involved in this? ;)

Jim Ford
11th April 2019, 02:34 PM
Wow, hang on!! The passage of time slows in the presence of a strong gravitational field. Theory has it that time stops in the grips of a black hole. So you can touch it, if you consider a matter transformation, and touch it for a very long time indeed! But all this needs to be considered in 'frames of reference', of course.

One thing's for certain Steve, and that is if you were to photograph a black hole, you'd do it in B&W with a film camera! ;)

Jim

Graham_of_Rainham
11th April 2019, 03:03 PM
With all the new discoveries of the various states, politicians manifestos have been grouped into the category of “Don’t Matter”...

Rawcoll
11th April 2019, 03:30 PM
Methinks this thread has a taken a path of its own! I do like the notion of the newly discovered element though :D

On a more serious note, this video well explains what we are seeing in the image.

https://youtu.be/S_GVbuddri8

Graham_of_Rainham
11th April 2019, 04:19 PM
Proof that the cat's real.

https://twitter.com/veeallie1/status/1116054420016517121/photo/1

Harold Gough
12th April 2019, 12:13 PM
Since you’re all talking scientific, what about this:

https://physicsworld.com/a/first-images-of-a-black-hole-unveiled-by-astronomers-in-landmark-discovery/

Apparently the image was taken using the EM1 Mk2 with a bloody long lens.

Nasty CA.

Harold