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sapper
24th March 2019, 11:05 AM
We use a slow cooker to cook beef and usually there is a thick residue left on the bottom of the cooker, on top of which is juice and fat. Juice and fat I can deal with, but anyone know what to do with the dark red coloured residue?

Jim Ford
24th March 2019, 11:15 AM
If it's a stainless steel cooker, I'd use a strong Sodium Hydroxide solution to remove it.

Jim

sapper
24th March 2019, 11:19 AM
If it's a stainless steel cooker, I'd use a strong Sodium Hydroxide solution to remove it.

Jim

Thanks Jim. I can remove it easily, it is soft so I just scoop it out. I wondered if I could use it in the gravy.

Jim Ford
24th March 2019, 11:21 AM
Thanks Jim. I can remove it easily, it is soft so I just scoop it out. I wondered if I could use it in the gravy.

I'm a vegetarian, so I wouldn't know as it's not 'kosher' for me!

Jim

Wally
24th March 2019, 11:24 AM
One you separate the fat, as an experiment, try freezing it and see if you can use it as a stock cube?

sapper
24th March 2019, 11:27 AM
One you separate the fat, as an experiment, try freezing it and see if you can use it as a stock cube?

I use the fat to roast the spuds, juice for gravy, but freeze the red stuff, use as a stock cube? Not sure I want to try that unless someone can tell me that it works. Then I will do that next time.

Graham_of_Rainham
24th March 2019, 12:40 PM
Experimenting is by far the best bit of cooking...

Do let us know the outcome

Wally
24th March 2019, 01:01 PM
Should you decide to have a go? Try --> https://skillet.lifehacker.com/for-crystal-clear-chicken-stock-turn-to-the-slow-cooke-1704836289


As Graham said: Experimenting is by far the best bit of cooking...

Do let us know the outcome?

Jim Ford
24th March 2019, 01:03 PM
Reminds me of an incident during Scott's expedition to the South Pole:

AIRC a party (3?) set out during the winter darkness to collect incubating emperor penguin eggs (one of the main purposes of the whole expedition). They became trapped for several months by the weather, in a makeshift shelter they'd made from rocks and canvas. They survived by cooking seal meat in a biscuit tin, heated by burning seal blubber (and became soot black by the end of the ordeal!). They didn't clean out the tin properly and suffered from dysentery as a result of the contamination.

This is from Apsley Cherry-Garrard's book "The Worst Journey in The World", which is free of copyright and can be downloaded from here:
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/14363

Well worth reading. We all know Captain Scott's story, but there's a lot more to it. Even the ship's journey to Antarctica is epic - before they even touch land/ice.

Jim

DerekW
24th March 2019, 03:04 PM
An ex domsci teacher suggests:-

Use a small amount of wine or stock and a whisk to deglaze the pan then whisk this into the gravy which may then need straining before use.

TimP
24th March 2019, 04:01 PM
Thanks Jim. I can remove it easily, it is soft so I just scoop it out. I wondered if I could use it in the gravy.

Course you could / should. Full of meaty goodness.

OM USer
24th March 2019, 06:59 PM
If you cooked in a roasting pan you whould just stir it in for gravy so what not from a slow cooker?

sapper
24th March 2019, 07:10 PM
If you cooked in a roasting pan you whould just stir it in for gravy so what not from a slow cooker?

Thats true. Ta.