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Harold Gough
8th March 2019, 05:05 PM
https://notweedpaper.com/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=eatweeds-144&utm_content=noteweed-paper

Harold

Jim Ford
8th March 2019, 05:39 PM
https://notweedpaper.com/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=eatweeds-144&utm_content=noteweed-paper

Nice idea, but I note that it's only 50% knotweed.

Japanese Knotweed has a reputation for being fearsomely difficult to eradicate, but I would think that if there's a patch in your garden, then hitting it with a dutch hoe everytime it pokes above ground, then it must eventually weaken and die. The key would be not to let green leaves show, which are needed for photosynthesis.

Jim

Keith-369
8th March 2019, 05:59 PM
At 5 Euros for a sample, I wonder what a few sheets would cost! :eek:

Harold Gough
8th March 2019, 05:59 PM
Nice idea, but I note that it's only 50% knotweed.



And 50% is not.:)

Harold

peak4
9th March 2019, 12:36 AM
Nice idea, but I note that it's only 50% knotweed.

Japanese Knotweed has a reputation for being fearsomely difficult to eradicate, but I would think that if there's a patch in your garden, then hitting it with a dutch hoe everytime it pokes above ground, then it must eventually weaken and die. The key would be not to let green leaves show, which are needed for photosynthesis.

Jim

Sorry Jim, not as easy as that unfortunately. Due to the rhizome root structure, the plant can lay dormant for years, and even the smallest bit you've just chopped up can be a viable specimen for regrowth; less than 1/2 a little fingernail's worth.

I've had to do a bit of amateur research in this stuff, due to the house we bought a couple of years ago being adjacent to a contaminated building site; now a fully open nursing home.

The rhizomes can spread up to at least 5 metres underground, 3 or 4 metres deep and pop up elsewhere. When it does break the surface, it can sprout at 4cm/day.

Latest research from Cardiff university suggests that Glyphosate is still probably the most effective treatment, but has to be applied with a bit of knowledge.
That is, the right time of year and the right dosing; too much is counter-productive. It's slightly acidic, which, if over applied, causes the leaves to shrivel before the plant has taken enough Glyphos in to make it as far as the rhizomes.
The plant then retreats back underground and spreads out even further.

Fortunately a chap I have contact with is an ecologist and Professor of invasive species, so was able to offer authoritative advice.
In our case it's not made it as far as our land, and the treatment company for the builders have offered us an insurance backed warranty and a multi-year treatment program.

Lots of info on the net, for example HERE (https://job-prices.co.uk/japanese-knotweed/#things-to-avoid) I've even seen photos of it growing out of 13A wall sockets, and filling kitchen cupboards.

On the bright side, someone did send me a recipe for Knotweed Jam (https://www.instructables.com/id/Sugar-Free-Japanese-Knotweed-Jam/) though I don't think I'd want it growing that close to my house.