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Janet
22nd February 2019, 10:02 AM
It's been nearly ten years since I had to get to grips with a new camera but after my e520 finally died (or was brutally murdered) last week, I find myself on that learning curve again!

Annoyingly, the manual is only available as a download but thanks to my Zutter machine I was able to print it off and bind it so I have it to hand.

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7818/47122653072_ffa2ee79bf_b.jpg

The first thing I did when I got the camera was to put the battery in, attach the lens and start taking photos...only then did I resort to the manual to try and figure out what the hell I was doing!

So how do you deal with new equipment - dive straight in or read the manual first?

Janet

Phill D
22nd February 2019, 10:11 AM
A little bit of both for me. I'll read the start of the manual and confirm I know the simple things like strap fixing and batteries and card use then give a cursory glance at the rest of the manual and dive in to the camera when the batteries are charged. If I read too much my brain gets full and stops taking anything in so I'll just go back to the manual when I get stuck. Nice binding Janet, that's a cool machine.

Ricoh
22nd February 2019, 10:42 AM
That's interesting - not come across the Zutter before today. I'm just googling it...

re setting up the EM5 - very little to do, just set to RAW capture and fire away. Can't remember if it's standard default, but you need the super control panel at the touch of a button to be able to alter ISO. That's about it.

Jax
22nd February 2019, 10:56 AM
Immediately hide the box and packaging so it becomes " just one of my old cameras " :)


Jax

DerekW
22nd February 2019, 11:21 AM
Search the web for independant instructions and suggested settings, plus scanning through the section in this forum on the camera.

Tram
22nd February 2019, 11:33 AM
Order up a spare battery then have a browse through the instructions.

Quick adjust of the settings and fire away

pdk42
22nd February 2019, 11:34 AM
I've never read a manual for a camera! Personally, I just make sure the battery is charged, grab a cuppa and start playing!

Naughty Nigel
22nd February 2019, 11:49 AM
I must admit I never read the manuals, but our son does, and he often tells me about features that I didn't know about.

Reading manuals used to be enjoyable, but they seem full of boiler plate text these days and are no pleasure to read.

Gone are the days when manuals, and especially service manuals, actually explained how things worked so you could work out why sometimes they didn't.

Naughty Nigel
22nd February 2019, 11:51 AM
On a separate note I do like the Zutter machine. It is ideal for binding music copies that must lay flat on the music desk and not fall off onto the manuals when lots of loud stops are pulled!

Janet
22nd February 2019, 12:01 PM
The Zutter machine is absolutely superb! I was very lucky and got mine with loads of binding wires, boards, papers and stuff for just £6 in a local charity shop.

Well worth keeping an eye on eBay because there are some on there for less than £40 which is still a bargain.

Janet

MJ224
22nd February 2019, 12:32 PM
First photo should not have a Zutter in it...*chr

Then you might get some advice, mine is go get some photos...…...;)

Naughty Nigel
22nd February 2019, 12:34 PM
The Zutter machine is absolutely superb! I was very lucky and got mine with loads of binding wires, boards, papers and stuff for just £6 in a local charity shop.

Well worth keeping an eye on eBay because there are some on there for less than £40 which is still a bargain.

Janet

Thanks Janet.

I did have a comb binder for a while but it broke. I use a thermal binding machine now which is good for books and manuals but useless for music.

Walti
22nd February 2019, 01:02 PM
I go and play with it first, then refer to the manual on my laptop or phone for the bits I've not made work properly..

I'm obviously more used to the digital world, as the last thing I'd do is print out the manual! ;)

Can't criticise the photo of the Zutter machine, as my keyboard has had a lot of photos taken!

Janet
22nd February 2019, 01:09 PM
I don't mind using the online manual, but I do like to have something printed out to carry round with me - I travel to work on the bus each day so it's perfect to slip in my bag to read whilst I'm travelling or when we have quiet spells at work.

I usually read bits, find something interesting then go home and try it - it's very rare I actually have the camera and manual together!

Janet

Ricoh
22nd February 2019, 02:38 PM
I don't mind using the online manual, but I do like to have something printed out to carry round with me - I travel to work on the bus each day so it's perfect to slip in my bag to read whilst I'm travelling or when we have quiet spells at work.

I usually read bits, find something interesting then go home and try it - it's very rare I actually have the camera and manual together!

Janet
Unfortunately the manual was written by a geek using geek language, so the best of luck to you. When I purchased the EM5 back in 2013 I thought it was important to understand the many options, but I came to my senses and set up the camera using a fairly primative one based on the factory restore, with the exception of RAW only. My advise would be keep it simple and toss the manual in the bin. ;)

Janet
22nd February 2019, 03:03 PM
keep it simple and toss the manual in the bin. ;)

That's just the sort of advice I need!

Flask of coffee made, sandwiches packed and now I'm off to take my new camera for a walk.

Janet

Grumpy Hec
22nd February 2019, 05:04 PM
Dribble *hthrob2

Naughty Nigel
22nd February 2019, 10:09 PM
Immediately hide the box and packaging so it becomes " just one of my old cameras " :)


Jax

I have a similar problem/procedure with new Vinyl LP's. I slip them behind a Dire Straights LP that I really have had for years and hope they are not noticed. ;)

MikeOxon
22nd February 2019, 10:28 PM
When I used a DSLR, I did set Raw only but, since changing to Olympus mirrorless, with excellent exposure information displayed in the viewfinder, I find JPEGs are almost always good, straight from the camera.

Being a belt-and-braces type, I now set RAW+JPEG but, most of the time, the raw files are just stored for possible future use.
I find searching the web -including this site, for hints and tips is usually better than reading the manual.

Wee man
23rd February 2019, 07:14 AM
Batteries on charge
Hide any evidence of purchase
File manual under when stuck read.
Fit grip
Fit side strap
Find card/cards
Check fit in bags
Clean lenses
Take battery out of charger (this after about ten mins)
Go and play with camera until battery runs out
Put card in computer and try to convince myself I am a much better photographer!
Forget to put battery back in charger.
Go online and tell this group about my new camera and promise to post some shots.
Curse myself for forgetting to put battery back on charge.
Leaf through manual ( pictures)
Hold camera and tell myself that charging will not be long.
Read manual to find out how long it takes to charge a battery.
See item 13
Go and do something else
See item 13.

The end


Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk

MJ224
23rd February 2019, 08:28 AM
My work thru is maybe to read the basics,ie battery installation, a basic what's this diagram and lens fittings. But then as already suggested get the thing on the road and try it out. After that you begin to know what questions to ask...….

I am not particularly good at reading and understanding these manuals, as they often use words I don't understand. I prefer to watch a Youtube presentation. Mind you have to sort those out as well.

Anyway, by the sounds of it you are well ahead now...……….

Harold Gough
23rd February 2019, 08:47 AM
The first thing I would do. once I had a charged battery installed, would be to go through the menus, setting my preferences e.g RAW only files, RC On, IS, preferred option On, focus and exposure area selected, ISO selected, Focus Peaking On, colour gradation Normal, Face Detection Off. That would be for Manual and Aperture Priority modes. Pretty soon I would want to link my flash guns for RC (flash menu).

I have one camera with a strap and one without. When I was using a tripod frequently I found it liable to get caught up.

I find the pdf manuals sufficient. The only hard copy manuals I have in my bag are for the setting linking of RC between my Nissin flash (for A7R) and the control unit.

Harold

Willom
23rd February 2019, 08:57 AM
I have had the camera for about nine years so I can't remember exactly what I did but I probably paid minimal attention to the manual. Except may be finding out how to set the function button. But for some reason I still carry it around in the camera bag.

Janet
23rd February 2019, 09:06 AM
I prefer to watch a Youtube presentation

That's exactly what I had to do when I got back. Despite having two fully charged batteries, one in the camera and one in the grip, the camera died on me after a few hours.

Could I find it where to change the settings? Not a chance. The Youtube video was perfectly clear and simple, apart from the menu that he was explaining so clearly and simply was missing from my display? What is this? Witchcraft?

After much throwing of manual at wall (a speciality of mine which really ought to be an Olympic sport) I eventually found the setting where I had very cleverly turned this menu off and all was well...

...until the next time!

Janet

DavidB
23rd February 2019, 11:11 AM
1) Put battery in to check if there's enough charge to start using immediately

2) Take some shots indoors

3) Take some more in the garden

4) Download pdf manual to 8" tablet for taking out in camera pack

5) Take camera out

6) Order an Op/Tech strap for it

7) Watch some youtube how to videos

.

.

.

99) Read manual

MikeOxon
23rd February 2019, 11:30 AM
I have remembered that I do look at the manual for the little diagram of how to thread the strap correctly. I can never remember exactly how to do it. It is important to do it the way they show, if you want it to be really secure.

blu-by-u
26th February 2019, 03:20 AM
If you are coming from another Olympus camera (Prosumer, PEN or E-series), there shouldn't be much stuff you need to get used to.

BUT first thing to do, FACTORY RESET. That's was my mistake when I first got that EM1.2. You really don't know what the shop or the technician may have set.

Next, as mentioned, charge the battery, Find that SCP and make sure it's on display, stuff in a SD and start shooting.

Naughty Nigel
27th February 2019, 07:53 PM
Immediately hide the box and packaging so it becomes " just one of my old cameras " :)


Jax

The good news is that " just one of my old cameras " really could be an investment.

I bought my RZ67 in 2015 from a camera shop in Japan. I paid about £400 for it including shipping in mint condition complete with the 110 mm f2.8 'standard' lens and an extra film magazine. Over the next year or two I bought four additional lenses which all cost somewhere between £80 and £130 delivered.

This was a particular itch that I had wanted to scratch for some time and at those prices, and with a drawer full of Velvia in the freezer there was no reason not to.

Anyhow, following a recent discussion on FaceBook concerning the current value of MF film cameras I had a look on evilBay and was amazed to see that the same outfit would now cost around £1,800, whilst the lenses attract considerably more too.

Ricoh
27th February 2019, 08:14 PM
The good news is that " just one of my old cameras " really could be an investment.

I bought my RZ67 in 2015 from a camera shop in Japan. I paid about £400 for it including shipping in mint condition complete with the 110 mm f2.8 'standard' lens and an extra film magazine. Over the next year or two I bought four additional lenses which all cost somewhere between £80 and £130 delivered.

This was a particular itch that I had wanted to scratch for some time and at those prices, and with a drawer full of Velvia in the freezer there was no reason not to.

Anyhow, following a recent discussion on FaceBook concerning the current value of MF film cameras I had a look on evilBay and was amazed to see that the same outfit would now cost around £1,800, whilst the lenses attract considerably more too.
Although those tw*** at Fuji"Film" are increasing the cost of their film prices by 30% (on the 1st April, would you believe) my film cameras are increasing nicely, thank you.

Naughty Nigel
27th February 2019, 08:19 PM
Although those tw*** at Fuji"Film" are increasing the cost of their film prices by 30% (on the 1st April, would you believe) my film cameras are increasing nicely, thank you.

The new Kodakchrome film is pricey too, but Ektar is more reasonable.

Film seems to be gaining popularity right now; not just older photographers going back to it, but millennials who see it as trendy and 'cool'.

I love using film but I use it sparingly so I have plenty for a while yet. That said I think I might stock up before 1st April.

Janet
27th February 2019, 08:23 PM
I don't use film any more but I still have the film mentality in that I occasionally find myself thinking I'll run out of film! It must be an age thing...:)

One thing I do quite often is deliberately limit myself to 24 or 36 exposures when I'm on a photography trip, with no deletions allowed, to try and focus my mind into thinking about what I'm doing rather than snapping randomly at anything.

Doesn't always work but it's fun trying!

Janet

Naughty Nigel
27th February 2019, 08:29 PM
I don't use film any more but I still have the film mentality in that I occasionally find myself thinking I'll run out of film! It must be an age thing...:)

One thing I do quite often is deliberately limit myself to 24 or 36 exposures when I'm on a photography trip, with no deletions allowed, to try and focus my mind into thinking about what I'm doing rather than snapping randomly at anything.

Doesn't always work but it's fun trying!

Janet

Try ten exposures! :)

I must admit there are many times that I have come home without making a single exposure, but I have enjoyed it all the same.

Not only is film expensive but it needs to be processed too, and if the exposure is any good it needs to be scanned, which all focuses the mind on photographs that might actually be keepers rather than random snapping as you describe.

Ricoh
27th February 2019, 08:43 PM
The new Kodakchrome film is pricey too, but Ektar is more reasonable.

Film seems to be gaining popularity right now; not just older photographers going back to it, but millennials who see it as trendy and 'cool'.

I love using film but I use it sparingly so I have plenty for a while yet. That said I think I might stock up before 1st April.
Rest assured I will **NOT** be purchasing a FujiFilm camera, now or at anytime in the future. Sod the B's.
As a user of both film and digital, I chose film based on the way it renders. In my mind there's no point shooting film to look as perfect as digital. One of the vastly unsung emulsions is Kodak ColorPlus, and the result looks great if push processed by one or two stops.

Ricoh
27th February 2019, 08:52 PM
I don't use film any more but I still have the film mentality in that I occasionally find myself thinking I'll run out of film! It must be an age thing...:)

One thing I do quite often is deliberately limit myself to 24 or 36 exposures when I'm on a photography trip, with no deletions allowed, to try and focus my mind into thinking about what I'm doing rather than snapping randomly at anything.

Doesn't always work but it's fun trying!

Janet
Having used film for a few years now in my second youth (I grew up using film when film was the only game in town) I find that I can not shoot random compositions with a didital camera, even though I know I can delete them almost as quickly as I can take them.

Naughty Nigel
27th February 2019, 10:17 PM
I just enjoy the whole photograph taking process with medium format. I find a large waist level finder (with loupe magnifier) is so much better for composition. I could spend all day just gazing through the finder. ;)

Ricoh
27th February 2019, 10:47 PM
I just enjoy the whole photograph taking process with medium format. I find a large waist level finder (with loupe magnifier) is so much better for composition. I could spend all day just gazing through the finder. ;)
I've used a Hassleblad and loved the WLF, so fully understand what you say. It's almost like viewing the scene using a camera obscura, and with that the act of composition becomes so more considered.

Naughty Nigel
27th February 2019, 11:01 PM
I've used a Hassleblad and loved the WLF, so fully understand what you say. It's almost like viewing the scene using a camera obscura, and with that the act of composition becomes so more considered.

I think my love of medium format and waist level finders all stem from my fasciation with my dad's Voigtländer over fifty years ago. At a time long before digital preview screens or CCTV the ability to peer into a WLF and see a perfect (but reversed) image of the view in front of me created a fascination that I have never lost. Then there was a little red window to look through to see the frame numbers on the film backing.

Modern digital cameras are fantastic machines, but they can never hold the same fascination for me as those simple black boxes with lenses, mirrors and a roll of film inside.

Ricoh
27th February 2019, 11:57 PM
I think my love of medium format and waist level finders all stem from my fasciation with my dad's Voigtländer over fifty years ago. At a time long before digital preview screens or CCTV the ability to peer into a WLF and see a perfect (but reversed) image of the view in front of me created a fascination that I have never lost. Then there was a little red window to look through to see the frame numbers on the film backing.

Modern digital cameras are fantastic machines, but they can never hold the same fascination for me as those simple black boxes with lenses, mirrors and a roll of film inside.
There's a lot to be said for optical viewfinders of any sort, but MF is of course a delight above all in the 35mm offering. In 35mm territory I use a couple of SLRs, two rangefinders and a simple scale focus Rollei 35. Love them all for different reasons, but I have to say I'm not a big fan of the EVF. With the EVF it's like viewing the world as presented by a television screen, with a somewhat 'false' appearance.

Naughty Nigel
28th February 2019, 08:38 AM
I have to say I'm not a big fan of the EVF. With the EVF it's like viewing the world as presented by a television screen, with a somewhat 'false' appearance.

I like the EVF for my day job because I can more-or-less see exactly what will be recorded onto the SD card, and more to the point, what I won't see recorded. However, the EVF has very limited dynamic range and is not at all subtle, so it has little value in artistic composition. I also dislike the 'lag' which gets in the way when photographing fast moving subjects like Damselflies!

I think there is a way of displaying the viewfinder image on an iPad, which has a much better display. I must ask our young Oracle! :)

Jim Ford
28th February 2019, 09:15 AM
I guess you blokes are the sort that consider the Morris 1000 Estate to be the pinnacle of automotive engineering! ;)

Jim

Ricoh
28th February 2019, 09:33 AM
I like the EVF for my day job because I can more-or-less see exactly what will be recorded onto the SD card, and more to the point, what I won't see recorded. However, the EVF has very limited dynamic range and is not at all subtle, so it has little value in artistic composition. I also dislike the 'lag' which gets in the way when photographing fast moving subjects like Damselflies!

I think there is a way of displaying the viewfinder image on an iPad, which has a much better display. I must ask our young Oracle! :)
DSLRs do that as well, don't they? But unlike the mirrorless device you're actually seeing through the lens. Mirrorless reminds me of Camcorders and I always felt detached from the real world.

Harold Gough
28th February 2019, 09:41 AM
When I started using my first digital camera I kept operating a phantom film advance lever.

If good processing labs reappear I might resume using my X-Pan, having the full kit.

Harold

Graham_of_Rainham
28th February 2019, 10:02 AM
Having tested hundreds of cameras over the years, the first thing I did (after battery charge) was to take a few pictures straight out the box, then do a factory reset and do a few more on full auto (if it had that feature).

After that, it would be a series of shots in manual mode from fully open/fast shutter to fully stopped down/slow shutter to assess the consistency of the exposure metering.

Lens testing was a whole different thing, with target cards and focus scales.

That was all years ago. Now I just, take them out the box, give them a little affectionate squeeze and start a whole new love affair... :cool:

Naughty Nigel
28th February 2019, 10:07 AM
I guess you blokes are the sort that consider the Morris 1000 Estate to be the pinnacle of automotive engineering! ;)

Jim

I thought they were? ;)

Naughty Nigel
28th February 2019, 10:10 AM
DSLRs do that as well, don't they? But unlike the mirrorless device you're actually seeing through the lens. Mirrorless reminds me of Camcorders and I always felt detached from the real world.

They do, but the EVF provides more clues as to what will be lost in shadows and highlights. By compressing the dynamic range the EVF also exaggerates the effects of shadows in a scene.

For me the most disconcerting feature of EVF's is the way that moving objects, people and so forth are suddenly 'frozen' in the viewfinder the moment the exposure is made.

Jax
28th February 2019, 10:20 AM
I guess you blokes are the sort that consider the Morris 1000 Estate to be the pinnacle of automotive engineering! ;)

Jim

Correct, it was ! *yes


Jax

Ricoh
28th February 2019, 10:25 AM
When I started using my first digital camera I kept operating a phantom film advance lever.

If good processing labs reappear I might resume using my X-Pan, having the full kit.

Harold
I use these guys, top service and fast too:
https://www.ag-photolab.co.uk/

Ricoh
28th February 2019, 10:42 AM
Having tested hundreds of cameras over the years, the first thing I did (after battery charge) was to take a few pictures straight out the box, then do a factory reset and do a few more on full auto (if it had that feature).

After that, it would be a series of shots in manual mode from fully open/fast shutter to fully stopped down/slow shutter to assess the consistency of the exposure metering.

Lens testing was a whole different thing, with target cards and focus scales.

That was all years ago. Now I just, take them out the box, give them a little affectionate squeeze and start a whole new love affair... :cool:
When I got back into photography in 2013, after many decades away, I thought those little TV screens on the back of cameras was the 'new' way, together with holding the camera at arms length to compose and shoot. With these modern electronic devices I also forgot how to 'read' the light - some might say that's progress - but having returned to 'proper' cameras, I'm once again fairly accurate at estimating light, making the settings based on how I want to express the scene and lighting, plus being able to focus where 'I' want to focus and not where some bloody 'cross hair' decides what's best. Advancing forward, we now have something called AI being interfaced between the photographer and the image. Very soon it will be possible to mount the camera on a tripod, aim it roughly, and tell the camera you'd like images of aeroplanes, and leave t get on with images making.

Naughty Nigel
28th February 2019, 10:47 AM
When I started using my first digital camera I kept operating a phantom film advance lever.

If good processing labs reappear I might resume using my X-Pan, having the full kit.

Harold

Peak Imaging near Sheffield do a top-rate job with film processing.

Nik & Trick in Folkestone also offer a comprehensive processing service and sell a wide range of chemistry and equipment for home processing including the wonderful Bellini products. Their website (https://ntphotoworks.com) and FaceBook page are well worth a visit. They also run the UK Film Photography page on FB.

If you have an X-Pan you really don't have any excuses for not using it! *yes

If you don't want it I'll send you a reply paid box to put it in! :D

Ricoh
28th February 2019, 10:54 AM
Peak Imaging near Sheffield do a top-rate job with film processing.

Nik & Trick in Folkestone also offer a comprehensive processing service and sell a wide range of chemistry and equipment for home processing including the wonderful Bellini products. Their website (https://ntphotoworks.com) and FaceBook page are well worth a visit. They also run the UK Film Photography page on FB.

If you have an X-Pan you really don't have any excuses for not using it! *yes

If you don't want it I'll send you a reply paid box to put it in! :D
If you change your mind and don't want the X-Pan, I'll leap at it. What a lovely camera!!

MJ224
11th March 2019, 12:05 PM
https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7921/40382892393_4c0babb067_b.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/24wuSZp)

My First Camera (https://flic.kr/p/24wuSZp) by Mark Johnson (https://www.flickr.com/photos/133688957@N08/), on Flickr

A Box Brownie...*chr

Darkroom
11th March 2019, 12:10 PM
https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7921/40382892393_4c0babb067_b.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/24wuSZp)

My First Camera (https://flic.kr/p/24wuSZp) by Mark Johnson (https://www.flickr.com/photos/133688957@N08/), on Flickr

A Box Brownie...*chr

Shame on you Mark ! You don't take very good care of your photo gear :D:D:D


Darkroom

Zuiko
11th March 2019, 12:11 PM
I guess you blokes are the sort that consider the Morris 1000 Estate to be the pinnacle of automotive engineering! ;)

Jim

No, surely that was the Austin Allegro. :D

TimP
11th March 2019, 12:20 PM
and just what’s wrong with the fabled Morris Marina?

DerekW
16th March 2019, 07:04 PM
test is this working
I misread the icon I thought this was a locked thread.. Fortunately not.

MJ224
16th March 2019, 10:17 PM
No, can't read a thing...…………...*chr