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Harold Gough
8th February 2019, 09:20 PM
Many months ago, it was suggested that, as many members are Senior Citizens, we should have a place to discuss problems of our age group. I think health issues were to be a priority.

OK, I'll kick it off. Last July I finally agreed to go onto treatment for blood high pressure and high cholesterol levels. Although I was just about OK on the old guidelines I was not according to the new ones. This conclusion was from a blood test and readings from a strap-on 24h blood pressure monitor.

The Atorvastatin for cholesterol was no problem. The Amylodipine was problematic, with a whole collection of side effects. From the morning after the first dose, I had itching over most parts of my body. On the third morning I had a spontaneous nosebleed, a one off, at least in my adult life. Here is part of a message I sent to my GP as few days later, having reported these symptoms:

"Itching continues daily, with all parts of the body, at random, apart from chest, back and abdomen, affected. Over-the-counter antihistamines give some relief.

Unexplained muscle stiffness: Last week, walking down stairs in the morning, my right calf muscle was stiff. Normal activities eased that. On another morning, the left calf muscle was stiff and slightly (sharp) painful, consistent with a strain. I walked that off easily, not consistent with my experience of injuries.

Possible hair loss: My hair has been very thin for several decades, such that any further loss would be visible as pink skin showing through. I think this is starting to happen but I have not found unusual qualities of detached hairs. I am watching this".

A day or two later I realised that the "shrinking of my gardening shoes in the sun in out conservatory" was my feet having swollen by about two shoe sizes.

I also realised that the daily apathy was not due to the hot weather.

The hair loss was confirmed.

I stopped taking the pills on my own accord (after less than two weeks) and arranged an appointment with my GP.

I am now on Indapamide and have had no side effects.

My wife has been on Amylodipine for two years longer than I have. She said she had no problem but admitted to her ankles swelling.

Harold

Otto
8th February 2019, 09:37 PM
I tried three different pills for high blood pressure, all of which either had nasty side effects or didn't work at all. I discussed this with my GP and we concluded that one reason I have (marginally) high BP was anxiety about having high BP. I haven't used my home BP monitor for a couple of months now and feel a lot better. I did however discover that a good slug of red wine lowered it quite well :).

Internaut
9th February 2019, 12:04 AM
Quick brain dump before bed...

Merely pushing 50.... I’ve been on blood pressure tablets for over a year now. They’re not that bad for most, so don’t worry. Just watch your balance. I had a couple of falls as my BP approached normal. That was blamed on lifestyle (drinker!) but I suspect it predates bad lifestyle because within weeks of taking the first pill I stopped being one of the overly sweaty people!

Amlodipine... Difficult for me. Crippens had a knee jerk reaction to what turned out to be partly a white coat issue, so I’ve been on three different tablets ever since. The all over itching and generally feeling “strange” happened early on. Keep in touch with your Doctor, but hopefully the reactions go away as your body gets used to it. The occasional cough never went away for me.

Cholesterol.... Given my lifestyle at the time, I was shocked... shocked, I tell you, to have cholestorol that was merely mediocre and no sign of Type 2 diabetes. The cholesterol came down with a better diet, less boozing and weight loss. But cholestoral is complicated. For a lot of high cholesterol people, the best lifestyle in the world doesn’t make a blind bit of difference. My old man is a case in point. Sorry.

An Omron home blood pressure kit costs around twenty quid. I wouldn’t bother with anything more complex than that. Your blood pressure is a great early warning system. When systolic goes below 110, for me, that’s the sure sign of an oncoming cold or flu. I’ve headed off the worst of the symptoms a few times with that approach.

Harold Gough
9th February 2019, 06:42 AM
I haven't used my home BP monitor for a couple of months now and feel a lot better.

I find that it takes at least 10 minutes of rest to get a minimal reading. Taking a reading doesn't make me anxious, mainly because my BP has never been dangerously high so I never felt I really needed to do anything about it. My approach, and that of my GP is better safe than sorry.

My main concern before going to my GP originally was that I would be given a stricter diet regime. However, he believes that cholesterol levels are genetically determined and are from output by the liver. So, still lots of red meat and red wine for me!

Harold

Tram
9th February 2019, 07:52 AM
My only issue at age 60 is Chronic Cluster Headaches

Tried most of the treatments, preventative drugs that are primarily to treat other ailments
These include Topiramate, Lithium and Gabapentin, all ineffective and come with unpleasant side effects.
Had the Oxygen cylinder for pain relief, but hardly a portable solution.

Seen many specialists and now manage it with Sumatriptan when an attack occurs
Injection works quickest, but tablets are ok, just not as fast acting
Not very pleasant, pain is extreme hence the nickname of "suicide headache"
Won't kill me so could be much worse, nothing else wrong so can't complain

Blood pressure is always right on the lower part of good and pulse rate is always low 60's. Never gets high even when I exercise or get a little bit agitated.
Must be either reasonably fit or a psychopath
Tad overweight at 6ft and 14st, but if it ain't broke don't fix it

TimP
9th February 2019, 08:04 AM
My wife keeps telling me to go to the doctors and get a full health check but I keep putting it off. When I have been and had a BP test all has seemed OK and the GP hasn’t prescribed any tablets (not on any). I get lower back pain, and take a single 400mg ibuprofen most nights, when I remember. I’m probably your typical male who puts off going to the doctors.

Harold Gough
9th February 2019, 08:22 AM
My only issue at age 60 is Chronic Cluster Headaches

Tried most of the treatments, preventative drugs that are primarily to treat other ailments
These include Topiramate, Lithium and Gabapentin, all ineffective and come with unpleasant side effects.
Had the Oxygen cylinder for pain relief, but hardly a portable solution.

Seen many specialists and now manage it with Sumatriptan when an attack occurs
Injection works quickest, but tablets are ok, just not as fast acting
Not very pleasant, pain is extreme hence the nickname of "suicide headache"
Won't kill me so could be much worse, nothing else wrong so can't complain

Blood pressure is always right on the lower part of good and pulse rate is always low 60's. Never gets high even when I exercise or get a little bit agitated.
Must be either reasonably fit or a psychopath
Tad overweight at 6ft and 14st, but if it ain't broke don't fix it

That's more than enough for your "only issue". My sincere sympathy.

As for drugs, lithium is the only one I had heard of.

Harold

Jim Ford
9th February 2019, 10:53 AM
My only issue at age 60 is Chronic Cluster Headaches
<SNIP>
Blood pressure is always right on the lower part of good and pulse rate is always low 60's.

I thought that low blood pressure can trigger headaches. Nitroglycerine lowers blood pressure (and is used for angina). 'NG headaches' were well known in explosives factories.

Jim

Tram
9th February 2019, 11:20 AM
I thought that low blood pressure can trigger headaches. Nitroglycerine lowers blood pressure (and is used for angina). 'NG headaches' were well known in explosives factories.

Jim

These headaches have nothing to do with blood pressure and mine is always fine anyway.

Graham_of_Rainham
9th February 2019, 01:18 PM
My only issue at age 60 is Chronic Cluster Headaches....

My wife suffered with this and 3-5 day migraine. We went through just about everything, all the drugs you mentioned and more...

About a year ago, she decided to go vegetarian and eat no processed foods.

She now only gets a bad headache about 6 to 8 weeks and for only a day or two.

Might be worth a try.?

Best of luck

Tram
9th February 2019, 05:45 PM
My wife suffered with this and 3-5 day migraine. We went through just about everything, all the drugs you mentioned and more...

About a year ago, she decided to go vegetarian and eat no processed foods.

She now only gets a bad headache about 6 to 8 weeks and for only a day or two.

Might be worth a try.?

Best of luck

With all due respect Headaches are not connected to Migraines.
They are generated by the hypothalmus when it triggers a trigeminal pathway in the brainstem.
Certain things are known to trigger this activity, in my case heat and fumes seem to do the most damage.
I have seen some of the leading neurologists in the country and been treated at the National hospital For Neurology and Neurosurgery at Queen Square.
Given up now on any remedies medical or therwise, life is for living, not undergoing tests and being a case study for all and sundry

DerekW
9th February 2019, 06:27 PM
20cm aprox of titanium rod and screws holding my spine in place.

Keith-369
9th February 2019, 08:36 PM
I would recommend anyone to go for a 'well man/woman' checkup.

I had one some years ago when I was working. The nurse did a test then said "I think the machines playing up" and did the test again. She then told me that everything was fine .... except for one test and she told me to see a doctor sooner than later because my cholesterol level was "a bit high".

I went to see my doctor who then did a proper and full test via the hospital. My final cholesterol result was .... 13.5 !! He wrote the prescription for tablets and, while I was there, I said "Is that why I feel the cold a lot". More tests were done and it was found that my thyroid was pretty much duff. More tablets (free prescriptions for everything when on hormone replacement therapy for thyroid) to take but what the heck. I just keep taking the tablets and all is fine.

Yes guys, go for that checkup, it really is worth it in the long run. If they find something then it's caught, hopefully, in good time. If all is good then it's a load off your mind.

Jim Ford
9th February 2019, 09:56 PM
This thread's a bit like a doctor's waiting room (I think that I was the one that came up with the original idea)!

A couple of years ago I became aware of a fuzzy area to the right of centre in my right eye, so I visited the optician. When I did the test where you have to look into an instrument and press a button when you see a light, it was found that I wasn't seeing the lights in the fuzzy area. The optician scanned my retina and said that he had faxed the local hospital for me to have an examination, but advised me not to wait but to go straight to Moorefields in London. I said that I would go the next day, but he said emphatically "No - go now!", which I did.

Moorefields found that I have Age Related Macula Degeneration, and I have been having injections in the eye since then, roughly on a monthly basis. There's no cure, it's just a matter of controlling the build up fluid under the retina, and suppressing the development of the abnormal blood vessels.

I've also got a benign enlarged prostate, which means I have difficulty in emptying my bladder, and when I do I have to go again a short while later. I've been taking Tamsulosin for it and also Finasteride. They've both now lost much of their efficacy, so I'm going to have to visit the doctor again soon.

Jim

Harold Gough
10th February 2019, 08:24 AM
This thread's a bit like a doctor's waiting room (I think that I was the one that came up with the original idea)!

A couple of years ago I became aware of a fuzzy area to the right of centre in my right eye, so I visited the optician. When I did the test where you have to look into an instrument and press a button when you see a light, it was found that I wasn't seeing the lights in the fuzzy area. The optician scanned my retina and said that he had faxed the local hospital for me to have an examination, but advised me not to wait but to go straight to Moorefields in London. I said that I would go the next day, but he said emphatically "No - go now!", which I did.

Moorefields found that I have Age Related Macula Degeneration, and I have been having injections in the eye since then, roughly on a monthly basis. There's no cure, it's just a matter of controlling the build up fluid under the retina, and suppressing the development of the abnormal blood vessels.



Jim, Sorry to hear that. A little bit of good news is that you have the form for which stem cells therapy has been successful in trials.

Harold

Tram
10th February 2019, 08:39 AM
Having read some of the more obviously age related conditions my headaches don't seem so bad.
No point worrying about all these things, my old mum survived the Blitz then breast cancer in her 70's and two pulmonary embolism's in her 80's
Went out on her daily shopping trip four years ago at age 88, car hit her as she crossed the road and that was game over.

TimP
10th February 2019, 08:44 AM
Having read some of the more obviously age related conditions my headaches don't seem so bad.
No point worrying about all these things, my old mum survived the Blitz then breast cancer in her 70's and two pulmonary embolism's in her 80's
Went out on her daily shopping trip four years ago at age 88, car hit her as she crossed the road and that was game over.

As dreadful as that must have been for everyone, I think Id rather go like that (suddenly) than suffer years of increasing debility and probably eventual dementia. There seems to be too much effort going in to prolonging life with little or no thought to quality of life.

Tram
10th February 2019, 08:49 AM
As dreadful as that must have been for everyone, I think I’d rather go like that (suddenly) than suffer years of increasing debility and probably eventual dementia. There seems to be too much effort going in to prolonging life with little or no thought to quality of life.

Totally agree, think my Mum felt the same too. She was beginning to get forgetful and hated the thought of care homes, we did for her too.
Very weird though, her house was like stepping aboard the Marie Celeste
Everything just left because she only expected to be out for about an hour.


Happened at the end of my road (ma lived about half a mile away) someone came and knocked to tell us.
It was caught on CCTV from a nearby car park camera, bit grim watching the recording.

Jim Ford
10th February 2019, 09:47 AM
Jim, Sorry to hear that. A little bit of good news is that you have the form for which stem cells therapy has been successful in trials.

Thanks Harold.

I expect that I'll be 'brown bread' by the time the procedure gets approved, besides I don't think that it's progressed to a stage where it would warrant it. It's a nuisance, though - it's in my best/dominant eye, the one that I used to look down a telescope or microscope, and camera viewfinder. I also used it with a watchmakers' eyeglass. I tried the left eye, but the muscles in that side won't hold one in!

Jim

Naughty Nigel
11th February 2019, 05:04 PM
That would be a real shame, Nigel. I really enjoyed participating in your excellent recent thread on medium format film and I would welcome more like that. I'm hoping that by containing the politics within one thread it will be easy to avoid. Did you see the recent TV documentary on Don McCullin, where he was walking around with a Mamiya RZ67 tucked under his arm for street shots!


Thank you for your kind comments John.

On reflection I have decided that it would be better all round to continue to contribute, but to steer clear of contentious subjects for the time being.

It was actually this thread that prompted me to return in the hope that I might be able to help fellow members with what I have learned over the past few years. This may be a long one but here goes:

Amlodipine.

I was first diagnosed with 'slightly raised blood pressure' in my early fifties, and was given the usual advice about losing weight, taking more exercise and reducing sodium intake.

I was desperately keen to avoid blood pressure medication as my late father had suffered unpleasant side effects, admittedly with much earlier drugs, but I had also heard scare stories from others. My GP also advised that once you start BP medication it is very, very unlikely that you will ever be able come off of it. I dislike the idea of being reliant on any kind of medication so I had plenty of motivation put off the inevitable.

I like to think that I eat a well balanced diet, but perhaps rather to much of it so I set about making the necessary changes. The only problem that I did suffer with was recurring severe headaches which seemed to be related to certain foods and drinks including many wines, beers, spirits, some cheeses and all chocolate. I got along well enough by cutting these out of my diet for about five years until I needed to go into hospital to have a 'troublesome' tooth removed. This was a molar which had never properly surfaced and which my Dentist was unwilling to remove at his surgery. I also managed to persuade the surgeon to remove a large cyst from my scalp at the same time.

I went for the pre-admission assessment and everything was fine apart from the 'slightly raised blood pressure' rearing its ugly head again but the Nurse did not expect this to be a problem.

Come admission morning I was checked over again, prepared for surgery and wheeled down to the dungeons in the hospital basement where I somehow enjoyed the surgeon's and anaesthetist's 'gallows humour' whilst they checked me over yet again, only to be told that my blood pressure was now dangerously high and that if they were to operate there was a very good chance that I would not make it. :eek:

I was kept in for a day under observation and my BP checked regularly. In fact my right arm was became extremely sore because my BP was so high that the cuff thingy had to be inflated so hard that it was uncomfortably tight. As you might imagine this focused my mind somewhat, and I was discharged on the strict instructions not to do anything strenuous and to make an urgent appointment with my GP, which I did.

I was initially prescribed 10 mg of Amlodipine per day which reduced my BP sufficiently and miraculously also stopped my headaches. Indeed, I have rarely had a headache since starting Amlodipine around seven years ago.

The only noticeable side effect has been some swelling of my lower legs and feet (Peripheral Oedema) during the day. I was warned about this by the Pharmacist who described it as 'pudding feet'. However, this is worse if I am inactive, including spending too much time on the computer putting the world to rights! I also suspect that some batches of the medicine are better than others but I cannot prove this. Regular gentle exercise such was walking definitely helps to reduce this problem, but there are other side effects that I will come to later.

I have also found that taking Amlodipine at night reduces the daytime swelling slightly. In fact I am taking part in a study organised by UK BioBank where those in the Control Group take their BP medication in the morning whilst we Guinea Pigs take them after 6.00 pm.

I also learned that short-term vigorous exercise such as running a few hundred metres, a mile or so sprint on my bicycle or racing the family to the other end of the swimming pool is more beneficial than walking or jogging long distances, and by doing these I was able to get the dose reduced to 5 mg daily.

My GP did try me on 5 mg of Lisinopril in an effort to avoid the problems of Peripheral Oedema, but within a day or two my headaches had returned and I felt generally unwell; so I went back to Amlodipine and haven't used anything else since.

Citrus Fruit:

Other than the problems of Peripheral Oedema above I have felt much better in myself on Amlodipine than for some time. However, there is a potential conflict if Grapefruit, certain oranges (including some orange juices) and some other citrus fruits are eaten when taking Amlodipine as these somehow affect the way that the body disposes of the drug, resulting in a form of overdose and low blood pressure. Having suffered this once or twice I now dilute all orange juice by 50% which tastes much better and contains only half the sugar. I also avoid Grapefruit except in occasional very small amounts.

To summarise, whilst Amlodipine has some unpleasant side effects it is generally well tolerated and is much better and safer than the risks of avoiding blood pressure medications altogether. However, with a balanced healthy diet, spasmodic vigorous exercise and losing a bit of weight it is possible to reduce dosage and side effects.

Tamsulosin:

I was first diagnosed with a 'high PSA' (~ 15) about four years ago. This was found only belatedly as the first time I went to the GP I was seen by an Asian lady who was clearly uncomfortable examining men, and refused to do so until another member of staff could be present. She said that 'nothing was wrong' and gave me a ticking off for wasting her time. She refused a PSA test on the grounds that I 'had wasted enough of her time already'.

I have to say this is about the only negative experience of our local GP surgery, but it did put me off going back for far too long.

When I finally plucked up the courage to return I was prescribed 400 mg Tamsulosin daily and was referred for a rectal biopsy. That was negative but my PSA remained stubbornly high so I was sent for an MRI scan and then a second biopsy to look at 'an area of interest'. This too was negative.

Tamsulosin works by relaxing the prostate and other organs in the body. One of the interesting side effects is also to reduce blood pressure.

Anyhow, my PSA was still climbing and had reached over 20 so I was sent for a 'Template Biopsy' which I was told is much more comprehensive than the rectal biopsies. This was carried out at the Freeman in Newcastle which I must say was excellent.

The biopsy results were negative, but my PSA continued to climb and had reached around 24. I was also suffering repeated infections which were causing problems mainly at night, and resulted in being put on a catheter for a couple of weeks. This was cleared up with antibiotics but flared up again soon afterwards.

The Specialist said that my prostate was very enlarged, (apparently PSA is related to prostate size as much as anything else), and that this along with 'being poked about far too often' was causing urinary infections.

Apparently prostate infections (prostatitis) are quite difficult to diagnose, and are often missed with the usual 'Litmus Stick' test.

I was advised to drink plenty of water, and most importantly, to 'avoid keeping it in' as stale urine is one of the most common causes of infection. This was valuable advise as I had often suffered problems after travelling, when of course 'keeping it in' is often difficult to avoid.

I was also told to avoid constipation because, as the Nurse explained, 'there isn't much space down there, so anything you can do to help'.

Finasteride:

I was finally put on Finasteride, which I understand is a hormonal treatment which works by shrinking the prostate. I had feared side effects but it seems the only side effect I have suffered is a slight reversal of 'male pattern baldness' for which it is prescribed at a lower dose!

For Jim's benefit this is a long-term treatment which doesn't provide maximum benefit for least least three months, so I think it is unlikely that you will 'get used to it' or need a higher dose. From my experience if the medication isn't working it is probably something that you are doing or not doing. As I have explained above there are quite a few things that you can and should do to help yourself, which probably includes not stressing unnecessarily about things!

The only remaining problem is that the Peripheral Oedema caused by Amlodipine means that I have to get up more often during the night than I would like to; but avoiding too many drinks after about nine or ten O'clock helps a great deal.

I am obviously not a medic, but I do hope that some of the information above will be of help.

TimP
11th February 2019, 05:43 PM
I’m still engrossed in reading Nigel’s post above but something in there reminded me of something. If you’re going to get medication for anything long term like that, do it before you claim a private pension as you will get a better monthly amount. When I took mine the IFA kept asking about medication and I truthfully replied I was on none, he went on to suggest I might like to delay taking my pension until such time as I had visited a doctor. Like Nigel I didn’t want to get started on anything as I’d probably never come off it again, but it certainly made me think if it was going to improve my private pension.

Harold Gough
11th February 2019, 06:23 PM
On reflection I have decided that it would be better all round to continue to contribute, but to steer clear of contentious subjects for the time being.

It was actually this thread that prompted me to return in the hope that I might be able to help fellow members with what I have learned over the past few years.

I hoped that a mutually supportive thread might be a good therapy :)



Come admission morning I was checked over again, prepared for surgery and wheeled down to the dungeons in the hospital basement where I somehow enjoyed the surgeon's and anaesthetist's 'gallows humour' whilst they checked me over yet again, only to be told that my blood pressure was now dangerously high and that if they were to operate there was a very good chance that I would not make it.

That's bedside manner!

Harold

Gate Keeper
12th February 2019, 02:05 PM
I would recommend anyone to go for a 'well man/woman' checkup.

I had one some years ago when I was working. The nurse did a test then said "I think the machines playing up" and did the test again. She then told me that everything was fine .... except for one test and she told me to see a doctor sooner than later because my cholesterol level was "a bit high".

I went to see my doctor who then did a proper and full test via the hospital. My final cholesterol result was .... 13.5 !! He wrote the prescription for tablets and, while I was there, I said "Is that why I feel the cold a lot". More tests were done and it was found that my thyroid was pretty much duff. More tablets (free prescriptions for everything when on hormone replacement therapy for thyroid) to take but what the heck. I just keep taking the tablets and all is fine.

Yes guys, go for that checkup, it really is worth it in the long run. If they find something then it's caught, hopefully, in good time. If all is good then it's a load off your mind.

Great advice Keith. When I worked in the community in Hampstead, we ran an evening well men’s clinic attached to a GP surgery in Swiss Cottage, the idea was to attract people in after work. In addition to what you experienced, we offered a testisticular cancer check and anything related to mens problems.

Not everyone can talk about health so easily. For some it is private or it is a taboo subject. Those affected might feel there is a stigma attached to admitting there could be anything wrong.

When I was a young man, if I dared mention taking a day off from work due to sickness, my Mother used to get onto me “ there is nothing wrong with you, you’ll get my big toe up .........if you don’t get into work” :D

Harold Gough
21st March 2019, 01:01 PM
It seems that Harvard have put down the decreasing incidence of dementia to reduction in smoking and drinking.

My mother, who never smoked and never drank alcohol, died of dementia. My father, who drank occasionally but smoked almost continuously did not.

Harold

TimP
21st March 2019, 01:22 PM
‘Decreasing incidence’ ? Really? It seems to be on the increase, or at least its bieng recorded more because the various NHS depts are actively looking for it. Part must be down to people living longer and developing the symptoms.

Harold Gough
22nd March 2019, 09:05 AM
Missing, presumed dead.

I broke a tooth this week and wanted an appointment at a dentist I had registered with. I don't believe in that nice little earner called "checkups" so I had only registered because I had a clicking jaw issue and I had to be referred to a hospital specialist by a dentist. Of course, they managed to find a filling which needed replacing.

Anyway, that was in 2012. Having not attended since, I had been de-registered. So, for NHS treatment, I have to re-register, taking my NHS number and bus pass, passport, or whatever. (I think they meant to include credit card, as this ins unlikely to be totally free). The first appointment for a "new" NHS patient is on 1 April! Am am not in paint, so no hurry.

Harold

TimP
22nd March 2019, 09:12 AM
Similar thing here, appointments take around 3-4 weeks although if you have an urgent issue they will usually try to get you in that same day. Doctors are even worse but again, being assertive with the Nazi manning the phone usually results in sense being seen.
We’ve just signed my mother up for a new dentist (needs wheelchair access and so forth) so we’ll see how that pans out, they want her in for a check up in the coming weeks so betting a payment will be necessary. Despite supposedly being NHS they still manage to charge an astronomical hourly rate, gotta pay for that expensive 2nd house refurb somehow!

Naughty Nigel
22nd March 2019, 10:20 AM
...being assertive with the Nazi manning the phone usually results in sense being seen.

Some years ago when our son was four or five years old he came down with a nasty bout of Norovirus. We all caught it and got over it within a couple of days but for some reason our son didn't and seemed to be weakening to the point that we were becoming worried.

I phoned the surgery to request a home visit (thereby avoiding our son straying too far from the lavatory) but this was refused on the grounds that only the elderly were entitled to home visits and that this was only possible 'in life or death situations'. I was then offered an appointment the next week which was clearly unacceptable so I told the Stazi Gatekeeper that we would come along in a few minutes when they would see us.

I drove to short distance to the surgery and walked in with my son over my shoulder like something you might see in a third-world country (he was too weak to walk) whereupon I was shown straight through to one of the senior partners! He was genuinely concerned about our son's condition and diagnosed dehydration. We were given some rehydration salts and medicine to help deal with the stomach problem and given instructions to go straight to A&E if the condition worsened or did not improve within the day. The GP even phoned that evening to make sure that everything was OK so I suspect the Satzi Gatekeeper might have been 'offered training'. :rolleyes:

TimP
22nd March 2019, 10:27 AM
It would have been so much better if the Stazi Gatekeeper had actually contracted norovirus! Karma!

Naughty Nigel
22nd March 2019, 11:01 AM
It would have been so much better if the Stazi Gatekeeper had actually contracted norovirus! Karma!

That might actually have made her more cheerful but thankfully she has since retired or otherwise moved on.

Otto
22nd March 2019, 11:52 AM
I feel so fortunate to have a walk-in GP surgery fifty yards from my front door, despite the occasional two hour wait.

Harold Gough
22nd March 2019, 12:44 PM
I feel so fortunate to have a walk-in GP surgery fifty yards from my front door, despite the occasional two hour wait.

Ours is strictly appointments only. The only time I have to wait more than 10 minutes is if the GP for my appointment is out on call.

Harold

Otto
22nd March 2019, 01:20 PM
You can make an appointment at ours too but you’ll normally not get one for a week or two.

Harold Gough
22nd March 2019, 02:08 PM
You can make an appointment at ours too but youll normally not get one for a week or two.

We might have a similar wait for a new illness but a follow-up to an earlier consultation is usually within a week. We can't book one beyond a month ahead.

Harold