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Wally
30th January 2019, 11:16 AM
A joke too far - AKA taking the friggin' piste :mad: --> https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/uknews/jailed-labour-mp-fiona-onasanya-will-continue-to-receive-taxpayer-funded-salary-in-prison/ar-BBSTrCd?li=BBoPWjQ&ocid=mailsignout

--> Quote: “The fact remains that, both as a solicitor and a Member of Parliament, you are fully aware of the importance of upholding the proper administration of justice.” Unquote = a free 3 months in clink plus any and all other expences paidfor by the tax-payer.

!!! Q/_ Who paid for her solicitor???

TimP
30th January 2019, 12:02 PM
Another example of what fine upstanding pillars of the community our MPs are, setting a fine example.
Worthless PoS!

Wally
30th January 2019, 12:14 PM
Another example of what fine upstanding pillars of the community our MPs are, setting a fine example. Worthless PoS!

Her's another quote from the article...

--> Mr Goldsmith, whose previous calls for reform were ignored by MPs in 2014, said: “I warned that a time would come when voters realised they had been conned and that is now what has happened.
“The fact that voters are lumbered with an MP who has been convicted and jailed shows unambiguously that the ‘Recall’ system we have is nothing more than a pretence.”

--> He was joined by Labour’s Lucy Powell, who said it was “totally wrong that an MP can continue to be paid whilst in prison”, adding that her behaviour “shames us all”.

“This case highlights what more we still need to do to ensure we are seen to be treated the same as everyone else,” she added.

Personally I hope she does go back to court. An extra 15 months, non-concurrent, plus a hefty fine should suffice to resolve all the issues.

Naughty Nigel
30th January 2019, 03:24 PM
Given our own experience with Cleveland Constabulary on a similar matter I do have some sympathy with the lady.


99.999% of the time speeding fines are only imposed to generate revenue on an industrial scale. I was told by a Officer of Cleveland Constabulary (I quote) "Frankly I don't care who was driving. All want is £60 and a driver's name so I can take this off of our system".

She then went on to threaten "a fine of £1000 and six points if you go to court. ".

Yet the same constabulary's Chief Constable was excused a speeding fine "because he couldn't remember who was driving at the time".

On the very rare occasions that the police choose to investigate these things (usually when a well-known person is involved) they expect us to take it seriously. :mad:

TimP
30th January 2019, 03:27 PM
No real problem with her speeding, it’s the deceit that I take issue with.

Naughty Nigel
30th January 2019, 03:40 PM
No real problem with her speeding, itís the deceit that I take issue with.

I fully agree with that, but the problem arises because speeding fines are used to harvest money on an industrial scale rather than to tackle dangerous driving. If the driver had been stopped at the time there would be no scope for lies or deceit.

TimP
30th January 2019, 04:46 PM
I wish they would deal with the noisy ingrates driving various vehicles, often Imprezas, with illegal exhausts, would make a lot of people very happy.
Children of unmarried parents every last one of them.

Wally
30th January 2019, 05:03 PM
Good news - hopefully - on a simililr issue if we take the - lack of - punishment into consideration. Sentence reviewd and punishment increased.

If it's deemed good for Joe Public, it should be good for members of the bar and parliament. Even more so, when the individual is supposedly a right honourable member of both institutions, where one makes and one defends right the law.

Wally
30th January 2019, 05:46 PM
I fully agree with that, but the problem arises because speeding fines are used to harvest money on an industrial scale rather than to tackle dangerous driving. If the driver had been stopped at the time there would be no scope for --> lies or deceit.

That's what the judge said... Yet, 3 months??? Giveh her chosen profession and, current position within government, merely adds insult to injury and highlights times when the law really is an ass?

Harold Gough
30th January 2019, 07:22 PM
That's what the judge said... Yet, 3 months??? Giveh her chosen profession and, current position within government, merely adds insult to injury and highlights times when the law really is an ass?

A proven liar? A long career in politics lies (excuse pun) ahead of her.

I'm sure there is some organisation, based in London, which issues legislation, as and when equired.

Harold

Jim Ford
30th January 2019, 07:30 PM
A proven liar? A long career in politics lies (excuse pun) ahead of her.

Didn't stop Boris Johnson!

Jim

Wally
31st January 2019, 01:33 PM
Seems that there is another chance for justice not only to be done, but being seen to be done? --> https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cambridgeshire-47071120

TimP
31st January 2019, 02:09 PM
Good job too! Stop her MPs salary too.

Naughty Nigel
1st February 2019, 09:52 AM
I wish they would deal with the noisy ingrates driving various vehicles, often Imprezas, with illegal exhausts, would make a lot of people very happy.
Children of unmarried parents every last one of them.

What did Clarkson say about Impratzas?

"Anywhere in the word, the sound of a flat four in the distance heralds the imminent arrival of a complete and utter moron." *yes

I don't think he was far wrong. :)

Otto
1st February 2019, 10:28 AM
Might be a Jowett Javelin :).

TimP
1st February 2019, 12:32 PM
Might be a Jowett Javelin :).

Donít give them ideas. Given the age I expect straight through exhausts are not illegal. Still, by now, most of them must be piles of brown dust.

Jim Ford
1st February 2019, 03:27 PM
Might be a Jowett Javelin :).

Now that was an interesting car. Never owned one though.

Jim

Naughty Nigel
1st February 2019, 04:28 PM
I vaguely remember the Jowett Javelin from my youth, but I don't think I have ever ridden in one or seen it close-up. My parents sometimes mentioned them for some reason.

There was something unusual about them. Didn't they have an aluminium body and a flat four engine?

Otto
1st February 2019, 04:30 PM
Still, by now, most of them must be piles of brown dust.


Actually I saw one at a vintage rally quite recently. The one that is rare is the Jowett Jupiter, it's sports car cousin:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jowett_Jupiter#/media/File:JowettJupiter2.JPG

I haven't seen one of those for a long time.

Edit: NN posted while I was writing this post. The Javelin had an all-steel body though the flat-four engine had an aluminium cylinder block. The design had some unusual features and was a bit ahead of its time:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jowett_Javelin

TimP
1st February 2019, 04:39 PM
I vaguely remember the Jowett Javelin from my youth, but I don't think I have ever ridden in one or seen it close-up. My parents sometimes mentioned them for some reason.

There was something unusual about them. Didn't they have an aluminium body and a flat four engine?

So wouldnít the flat four engine make it more or less a 1950s Impreza?

Otto
1st February 2019, 04:42 PM
To some extent, yes! Like the Impreza the Javelin enjoyed some sporting success too.

Jim Ford
1st February 2019, 09:21 PM
I vaguely remember the Jowett Javelin from my youth, but I don't think I have ever ridden in one or seen it close-up. My parents sometimes mentioned them for some reason.

There was something unusual about them. Didn't they have an aluminium body and a flat four engine?

I used to get a lift in one to work after my apprenticeship. I cant remember much about it.

IIRC, it had two transmission shafts, one down each side. I guess that the diff. lived somewhere up near the gearbox and each shaft drove a wheel through bevel gears.

Jim

Otto
1st February 2019, 10:37 PM
According to my book "Post-War British Thoroughbreds" by Bruce Hudson, the Javelin had a conventional rear axle but there was a "Layrub" coupling in the transmission shaft dividing it in two longitudinally rather than splitting it into two separate shafts

The "Super Sentinel" steam waggons (their spelling) had an ingenious engine design in which the differential was actually incorporated into the crankshaft, with a separate chain drive to each rear wheel. I have studied the diagrams at length and still cannot entirely understand how it worked but if it did, it was very clever!

Otto
1st February 2019, 10:59 PM
Further reading of Hudson's book - it was the Jupiter that had aluminium bodywork, on a tubular steel chassis. Only 1000 were built which explains their rarity today.

Naughty Nigel
1st February 2019, 11:07 PM
Further reading of Hudson's book - it was the Jupiter that had aluminium bodywork, on a tubular steel chassis. Only 1000 were built which explains their rarity today.

Given our national experience of building aircraft in aluminium during WWII, including Spitfires on Jaguar's Castle Bromwich site, I am surprised that it has taken our motor industry so long to catch up with the concept of building aluminium cars.

Otto
1st February 2019, 11:14 PM
Didn't the Rover 2000 / 3500 have some aluminium panels? I guess it's down to economics, aluminium is more expensive and not as strong as steel, plus it's more corrosion resistant - we can't have cars lasting too long else people won't buy new ones!