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Harold Gough
30th October 2018, 08:41 AM
I put out scraps for our local fox mid evening each day but never see the animal.

The first evening after the clocks "went back", I and I was operating on GMT, we looked out to see the fox fairly close to the house, metaphorically with its knuckles on its hips, wondering why its supper was late.

Any similar experience with the time change?

Harold

Naughty Nigel
30th October 2018, 08:55 AM
Interesting you should say that.

Our pet rabbit is used to being let out first thing on the morning, which is usually about 7.00 am. Any later than that and he decides to have a lay in!

Since the return to GMT he has been reluctant to venture out in the morning, and I for one am not getting up at 06.00 just to let him out. He will just have to get used to it. :)

TimP
30th October 2018, 10:03 AM
Could we perhaps introduce Nigel’s rabbit to Harold’s fox? Two birds, one stone! Well, for one day anyway!

OM USer
30th October 2018, 04:12 PM
You can have as many foxes as you want from around here - we certainly don't want them.

DerekW
30th October 2018, 04:19 PM
I have great difficulties into coming to terms re foxes in the urban environment, they are vermin, OK a top preditor but do we want cats, chickens and other domestic pets killed randomly and not for consumption.

Foxes are meant to be hunted by a pack of hounds and a Hunt of people in pink coats shouting Tally-Ho as they chase across the countryside jumping over hedges and eventually smearing the blood of the freshly killed fox on the faces of people on their first hunt.

and providing the local camera wielders with something colourful and exciting to photograph.

TimP
30th October 2018, 04:47 PM
Love foxes, hate cats and think the hunt should all die as horribly as the foxes they murder.
Bunch of posh wasters with nothing better to do than murder as much wildlife as they can get away with. Even the pheasants they commit genocide on end up on bonfires, none is eaten due to the lead shot, tons and tons of the stupid things.



Stands back having lit blue touch paper.

Jax
30th October 2018, 06:06 PM
Love foxes, hate cats and think the hunt should all die as horribly as the foxes they murder.
Bunch of posh wasters with nothing better to do than murder as much wildlife as they can get away with. Even the pheasants they commit genocide on end up on bonfires, none is eaten due to the lead shot, tons and tons of the stupid things.



Stands back having lit blue touch paper.

I agree Tim. 60% of the earth's wildlife has disappeared since 1970. Despite this, we still have ignorant moronic cretins who consider it "fun" to shoot anything that flies or walks on 4 legs. Even the Scilly Isles are allowing "Big Game Hunters" to shoot wild goats with high powered rifles in the name of sport now. Millions of migrating wild birds are shot every year by our idiotic friends in the EU, again in the pursuit of sport or fun. The worldwide list is staggering and disgusting.

The earth is slowly being ruined by what is wrongly considered to be the highest form of life on the planet, HUMANS. Given the choice, rather than shoot defenceless animals, I can think of far more deserving 2 legged human targets.

Jax

Jim Ford
30th October 2018, 06:57 PM
We feed the local foxes and have also had badgers feeding in the garden.

Jim

DerekW
30th October 2018, 08:29 PM
We get a brace or so of pheasants from a friend that beats at one of the local shoots, a good source of protein - and also very tasty. Cheaper than buying butcher's meat apart from the glass or two of wine to go with the pheasant.

Jim Ford
30th October 2018, 11:05 PM
Even the pheasants they commit genocide on

Pheasants are a non-native species that has no place in the U.K.. A study carried out some years ago on the contents of pheasants crops, showed that they mostly contained the larvae of our grassland feeding butterflies and it at least is partially to blame for their decline.

An artificially high population of a predator leads to an artificially low population of prey species.

Jim

Jax
30th October 2018, 11:10 PM
We get a brace or so of pheasants from a friend that beats at one of the local shoots, a good source of protein - and also very tasty. Cheaper than buying butcher's meat apart from the glass or two of wine to go with the pheasant.

If cost, protein, and taste are your main requirements, have a poached egg and leave the pheasants survive in the wild. :D

Jax

Jax
30th October 2018, 11:22 PM
Pheasants are a non-native species that has no place in the U.K.. A study carried out some years ago on the contents of pheasants crops, showed that they mostly contained the larvae of our grassland feeding butterflies and it at least is partially to blame for their decline.

An artificially high population of a predator leads to an artificially low population of prey species.

Jim

You did state "partially to blame" Jim, but I would be willing to bet pesticides and the destruction of our countryside and wild flower areas by inconsiderate farming, building and other environmental factors plays a very much larger part than the pheasants.

Jax

Jim Ford
30th October 2018, 11:26 PM
If cost, protein, and taste are your main requirements, have a poached egg and leave the pheasants survive in the wild. :D


But pheasants are captive bred to be released and hunted. They have no place in our environment - the same as mink.

Jim

Jax
30th October 2018, 11:35 PM
But pheasants are captive bred to be released and hunted. They have no place in our environment - the same as mink.

Jim

Valid point *yes The only ones I've ever occasionally seen have been roaming wild. Maybe that suggests our very few local pheasant shoots need some more skillful shooters :D

Jax

Naughty Nigel
31st October 2018, 12:33 AM
You did state "partially to blame" Jim, but I would be willing to bet pesticides and the destruction of our countryside and wild flower areas by inconsiderate farming, building and other environmental factors plays a very much larger part than the pheasants.

Jax

Bees, butterflies and so forth have just become bored with a constant diet of oil seed rape. :rolleyes:

Grumpy Hec
31st October 2018, 10:04 AM
I'm afraid I have developed a, probably, unhealthy dislike of urban foxes. They kill my chickens and ducks, even in the middle of the day when we and/or the dogs are nearby.

There are simply too many of them as there is an endless supply of food via the numerous branches of FoxDonalds, i.e. dustbins etc., in the urban environment. They are smart and adaptable but we humans have, as we nearly always do, upset the balance such that the numbers are excessive.

Where we live there used to be an occasional cull when guns would spread out across the island and walk the length reducing the fox population. That simply will not happen now.

What happened about ten years ago was that the population grew so much that they got mange and large numbers died an unpleasant death. It seems reasonable to anticipate that happening again.

I do not deny that they are appealing to watch but as in most things in moderation please.


Hec

Harold Gough
31st October 2018, 10:11 AM
Foxes are meant to be hunted by a pack of hounds and a Hunt of people in pink coats shouting Tally-Ho as they chase across the countryside jumping over hedges and eventually smearing the blood of the freshly killed fox on the faces of people on their first hunt.

The eleventh commandment?

Harold

Harold Gough
31st October 2018, 10:16 AM
I'm afraid I have developed a, probably, unhealthy dislike of urban foxes. They kill my chickens and ducks, even in the middle of the day when we and/or the dogs are nearby.

There are simply too many of them as there is an endless supply of food via the numerous branches of FoxDonalds, i.e. dustbins etc., in the urban environment. They are smart and adaptable but we humans have, as we nearly always do, upset the balance such that the numbers are excessive.

Where we live there used to be an occasional cull when guns would spread out across the island and walk the length reducing the fox population. That simply will not happen now.

What happened about ten years ago was that the population grew so much that they got mange and large numbers died an unpleasant death. It seems reasonable to anticipate that happening again.

I do not deny that they are appealing to watch but as in most things in moderation please.


Hec

I would not condone the feeding of foxes to the level where they become dependant. We just put out a few scraps.

Our foxes are not urban. We have open countryside at the far end of our garden and two gardens away to one side.

We have a problem with mice and voles damaging some of our plants. Foxes eat mice and voles.

Harold

Grumpy Hec
31st October 2018, 12:00 PM
I'm talking specifically about urban foxes. A friend of mine who lives in an area which sounds very much as you describe yours keeps chickens and ducks and does not have anything like the same fox problem as I do.

The problem is an unnaturally high population density created by the human population and our habits.

Hec

Harold Gough
31st October 2018, 12:26 PM
Pheasants are a non-native species that has no place in the U.K.. A study carried out some years ago on the contents of pheasants crops, showed that they mostly contained the larvae of our grassland feeding butterflies and it at least is partially to blame for their decline.

An artificially high population of a predator leads to an artificially low population of prey species.

Jim

Pheasants also eat ants. Fewer pheasants could mean more ants.

Harold

Harold Gough
31st October 2018, 12:27 PM
The problem is an unnaturally high population density created by the human population and our habits.

It's a reassuring to know that the human population remains at natural levels!:D

Harold

Jim Ford
31st October 2018, 04:23 PM
Pheasants also eat ants. Fewer pheasants could mean more ants.

Nothing wrong with ants. They've evolved and co-existed with 'us' on the British Isles for millions of years.

Jim

Harold Gough
1st November 2018, 07:11 AM
Nothing wrong with ants. They've evolved and co-existed with 'us' on the British Isles for millions of years.

Ants eat insects, including the ones you don't like pheasants eating.

Harold

Jim Ford
1st November 2018, 09:38 AM
Ants eat insects, including the ones you don't like pheasants eating.

But ants and their native prey species have evolved together over millennia and have achieved a balance. To then introduce a large population of a non-native predator upsets this balance. Left to themselves without intensive captive rearing, pheasants would be at a much lower population density and have a minimal impact on out native invertebrates.

Jim

Harold Gough
1st November 2018, 10:05 AM
But ants and their native prey species have evolved together over millennia and have achieved a balance. To then introduce a large population of a non-native predator upsets this balance. Left to themselves without intensive captive rearing, pheasants would be at a much lower population density and have a minimal impact on out native invertebrates.

Jim

Local evidence does not support this. I have heard estimates of the wild population locally as about 40. I have seen 18 on more than one occasion in our garden. This is a wild population. True, they are not being shot.

What I can't understand is how the population keeps up it numbers with so many foxes, badgers, etc. in the area.

Harold

Jim Ford
1st November 2018, 10:59 AM
Local evidence does not support this. I have heard estimates of the wild population locally as about 40. I have seen 18 on more than one occasion in our garden. This is a wild population. True, they are not being shot.

So 45% of the local wild population of pheasants have congregated in your garden on more than one occasion? So what brings them there in such unlikely numbers?


What I can't understand is how the population keeps up it numbers with so many foxes, badgers, etc. in the area.

Because their numbers are constantly being topped up by gamekeepers breeding them!

Jim

Harold Gough
1st November 2018, 11:26 AM
So 45% of the local wild population of pheasants have congregated in your garden on more than one occasion? So what brings them there in such unlikely numbers?

They have always come in, over two decades. More recently, I give them a small amount of chicken grain to give the small birds a chance to eat the expensive mix.

Because their numbers are constantly being topped up by gamekeepers breeding them!

Jim

I was referring to our local population, where there is no shooting and therefore no artificial rearing.

Harold