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Ian
25th September 2018, 06:00 PM
It's been a very interesting press preview day at the show, here in Cologne, but not for Olympus fans, They told us that they are saving their big news foer the 100th anniversary of the company next year.

In the meantime, Panasonic announced a new and rather unique Micro Four Thirds 10-25mm f/1.7 Leica DG Vario Summilux constant aperture zoom lens that they described as five primes in one.

But their big news was that they have brought their collaboration with Leica even closer and have adopted Leica's full frame L-mount, with two models in the pipeline - a 24 megapixel Lumix S1 and a 47 megapixel Lumix S1R. Look out for dual-IS and 8K video capabilities.

Sigma is also on board and will produce L-mount lenses and there is speculation that there could be a body as well, perhaps featuring a Foveon full frame sensor, but none of this was confirmed today.

Ian

Ian
25th September 2018, 06:45 PM
http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/511/P9250076.jpg (http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/100351)

And here is the new 10-25 f/1.7 being introduced.

Ian

RobEW
25th September 2018, 06:54 PM
Fixed aperture? 'Scuse my ignorance but do you mean that it has to be on f/1.7 whether you like it or not?

MikeOxon
25th September 2018, 06:58 PM
Constant aperture means that the set aperture remains the same when you zoom. So f/1.7 is maintained across the whole zoom range.

Ian
25th September 2018, 07:10 PM
Fixed aperture? 'Scuse my ignorance but do you mean that it has to be on f/1.7 whether you like it or not?

Well-spotted :) I of course meant 'constant' aperture.

Ian

RobEW
25th September 2018, 07:15 PM
Ah - I see. The widest available aperture doesn't vary when zooming (i.e. more like the 12-40 f/2.8;not like the 12-60 f/2.8-f/4).

Sounds an interesting lens spec for indoors - perhaps especially for wedding shooters etc.

Ross the fiddler
26th September 2018, 12:19 AM
Thanks Ian. Well Panasonic have shown their offerings for next year, but I'm hoping the rumours, particularly from that guy Simon are true.
His list is, E-M1 Mk III with much improved low light & high ISO ability, PEN-F Mk II, MC20 & a lens announcement 150-400 F4.0-5.6 to come at the end of 2019.
A shame Olympus couldn't give us a bit more of a tease of what is to come. Also, I believe Panasonic are bringing FW updates for a few cameras (https://www.43rumors.com/panasonic-announces-new-gh5-gh5s-g9-firmware-update-features-to-be-released-in-october/). It would have been nice if there was an announced FW 'carrot' from Olympus too. :(
Anyhow, I'm still looking forward to seeing what Olympus will be bringing next year, even if I can't afford it. :rolleyes:
I got to watch the live Olympus press video (later) here.
Olympus Photokina 2018 Press Event - YouTube

*chr

TimP
26th September 2018, 07:40 AM
So would an early 2020 release of a EM-1 Mk3 mean a 3 year product cycle? (I don’t recall the release of the Mk1 I’m afraid)

RobEW
26th September 2018, 07:44 AM
Thanks for link. He seemed a rather uninspiring speaker, lacking in passion and energy. I know these comments are about style rather than content, but ne would hope more energy might show through even in a very measured speaker with not much to announce.

Re the PL 10-25 ... it would have been hard to imagine 18 months ago that someone who could afford it might chose not to have the superlative Oly 12-40, but if the 10-25 proves as good as it sounds, I can imagine people using that for indoors and 12-100 f/4 for outdoors and finding little use for the 12-40.

AMc
26th September 2018, 09:11 AM
This particular rumour seems to be quite persistent.


https://www.43rumors.com/ft5-the-new-olympus-high-end-camera-will-be-announced-in-january-and-feature-a-new-mft-sensor/


I imagine a new flagship E-M1 in their 100th year would be appropriate perhaps keeping the Mkii in production at a lower price point?
The Mkii and any potential Mkiii are going to be too large and too expensive for me but I'm sure there are lots of people with deeper pockets who'll be excited.

Keith-369
26th September 2018, 10:49 AM
That 'long zoom' rumour seems to have gone off the boil too.

Ross the fiddler
26th September 2018, 11:01 AM
That 'long zoom' rumour seems to have gone off the boil too.

Simon had suggested it will be announced in March for an end of year (2019) release though.

OM USer
26th September 2018, 12:05 PM
...Panasonic announced a new and rather unique Micro Four Thirds 10-25mm f/1.7 Leica DG Vario Summilux constant [sic] aperture zoom lens...
I'm happy with my Oly 7-14. The Pany 10-25mm looks even bigger, will be very expensive, and 10mm is not really wide enough on occassions. Might be useful for studio professionals givenm the F1.7 but then there are some nice Oly F1.2 primes if you have the money.

...MC20 & a lens announcement 150-400 F4.0-5.6 to come at the end of 2019. A shame Olympus couldn't give us a bit more of a tease of what is to come.Anyhow, I'm still looking forward to seeing what Olympus will be bringing next year, even if I can't afford it.

An Oly 150-400mm would be nice for the garden birds and nature reserve hides but I'm guessing it would be hideously expensive and much bigger than the 40-150 PRO and somewhat bigger than the 300mm PRO. The MC20 might fit my budget if I squeeze it hard enough and it would fit in my camera bag.

Internaut
26th September 2018, 09:35 PM
It’s all interesting. This is the camera industry responding to the threat of the smartphone and, unfortunately for many, following the money which means higher end and more expensive. I’ve recently been thinking that high end smaller format is becoming an increasingly hard sell against low end larger format... I’m not sure where this leaves Olympus. They are currently the only major camera maker without a larger format option? (Bearing in mind Fuji’s smart looking medium format move.)

Ian
27th September 2018, 06:10 AM
Haha - if you know what to look for you can see me in the audience :D

It was a pretty poor showing from Olympus if you ask me. The press conference was a waste of precious time for the assembled journos.

Ian

Thanks Ian. Well Panasonic have shown their offerings for next year, but I'm hoping the rumours, particularly from that guy Simon are true.
His list is, E-M1 Mk III with much improved low light & high ISO ability, PEN-F Mk II, MC20 & a lens announcement 150-400 F4.0-5.6 to come at the end of 2019.
A shame Olympus couldn't give us a bit more of a tease of what is to come. Also, I believe Panasonic are bringing FW updates for a few cameras (https://www.43rumors.com/panasonic-announces-new-gh5-gh5s-g9-firmware-update-features-to-be-released-in-october/). It would have been nice if there was an announced FW 'carrot' from Olympus too. :(
Anyhow, I'm still looking forward to seeing what Olympus will be bringing next year, even if I can't afford it. :rolleyes:
I got to watch the live Olympus press video (later) here.
Olympus Photokina 2018 Press Event - YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_P5whnV7IE&feature=share)

*chr

Ross the fiddler
27th September 2018, 09:06 AM
Haha - if you know what to look for you can see me in the audience :D

It was a pretty poor showing from Olympus if you ask me. The press conference was a waste of precious time for the assembled journos.

Ian

I looked but couldn't pick you. *shrug Sorry. :)

*chr

TimP
27th September 2018, 09:14 AM
I accept what you’re saying about a poor show from Olympus but almost find it heartening in a way. I’m glad they don’t replace the current top of range camera every year, or roll out a new lens mount with similar frequency. Some new glass would be nice though, some firmware updates perhaps and maybe some other accessories too.
Too much of our world is announce today, discontinue tomorrow. It felt less like that with Canon but with lens updates starting to come thick and fast in more recent times it was maybe moving that way.

OM USer
27th September 2018, 10:12 AM
Actually I feel we are a bit let down by Olympus in the mid range zoom options. There are some excellent mid priced primes and some excellently priced low end zooms. The 12-50 springs to mind as one of these but at F/6.3 at the long end it is just a bit too slow. Not everyone needs F/2.8 (price and size spring to mind), but a 5x to 8x zoom that goes from F/3.2 at the short end to F/4.8 at the long end would be ideal. Something just a tad up from Panasonic's 12-60 F/3.5-5.6 or a stop brighter than Oly's excellent 40-150mm and 14-150mm which both tail off at F/5.6.

Keith-369
27th September 2018, 10:22 AM
The world and its products go round in circles, in fashion, mobile phones and many other things. In photography, everything got smaller right down to those ridiculously tiny film cassettes, then things got bigger and everyone had to have a full frame DSLR, then people (or the manufacturers) decided that smaller was better, now it's back to full frame. All of this, of course, driven by manufacturers trying to think of new things/trends to keep the market going.

I must admit, I have no intention of going back to full frame even if the cams themselves are smaller and lighter. I see no benefit in buying a 300mm lens and get just that ... 300mm and if I want a 600mm lens, then I would need pots more money not only for the lens but to hire someone to carry it for me.

I for one am happy to see Olympus staying dedicated to M43 (so far) and hope that they will give us some great lenses (hoping for an alternative to the Panny 100-400 but at a competitive price to it), keep giving us good updates on our cameras and continue with new and innovative bodies. *chr

TimP
27th September 2018, 10:36 AM
Actually I feel we are a bit let down by Olympus in the mid range zoom options.........Not everyone needs F/2.8 (price and size spring to mind), but a 5x to 8x zoom that goes from F/3.2 at the short end to F/4.8 at the long end would be ideal.
Why not settle on a constant F/4? There are other constant aperture zooms being produced so it’s do-able. By 5x to 8x, what focal length are you hankering for?

TimP
27th September 2018, 10:42 AM
I must admit, I have no intention of going back to full frame even if the cams themselves are smaller and lighter. I see no benefit in buying a 300mm lens and get just that ... 300mm and if I want a 600mm lens, then I would need pots more money not only for the lens but to hire someone to carry it for me.


This has only become the norm in recent times, in film days we had none of this ‘crop factor’ nonsense, a 50mm lens was the standard based on comparable field of view to the human eyesight and a 300mm lens was just that, 300mm which I suppose you could describe as a 6x telephoto. I think we’ve got used to getting that extra reach and I too would sorely miss it. I guess with FF you’ve got more leeway to crop but does it compare to the extra crop being in the camera?
Swings and roundabouts, all of it.

OM USer
27th September 2018, 01:24 PM
Why not settle on a constant F/4? There are other constant aperture zooms being produced so it’s do-able. By 5x to 8x, what focal length are you hankering for?

There must be compromises, or perhaps that should be higher costs, in a constant aperture zoom. The cheaper zooms do seem to all have a variable aperture - its just a bit small at the long end. By all means produce a constant F/4 12-60mm (8x zoom) or 14-140mm (10x zoom) but I was thinking of a price point between the constant F/4 12-100 that we have (very expensive) and the existing affordable but light constrained 12-50, 14-42, 40-150, and 14-150. Actually a cheaper, lighter, tad smaller, more plastic, non-PRO version of the 12-100mm PRO would be ideal.

pdk42
27th September 2018, 08:52 PM
It seems clear to me that mirrorless "FF" (36x24mm) is now the standard enthusiast/pro sweet spot of IQ versus size/price/features. M43 had a niche five years ago but I think it's now being eroded. Back when the E-M5 was launched we had a super small system that was relatively well priced, feature packed and not far behind other systems in IQ.

In the intervening time all the other major vendors have launched mirrorless FF and have done so with newer sensor tech that delivers stunning dynamic range and noise performance.

Meanwhile, m43 sensor tech has hardly moved. In truth the images from my E-M1ii are only marginally better in a technical sense than what the E-M5 delivered. M43 desperately needs a jump in sensor tech to keep in the race. Dynamic range and noise performance are the fighting grounds.

I know that Olympus have moved up market in terms of big glass and more body features to stay in the same market as FF, but I don't think it's enough without the sensor improvement.

Of course I understand entirely that m43 can still produce spectacular images (better than MF film) - but that's not the point - it's about comparative performance.

Now don't get me wrong, I'm still a massive Olympus fan and I have no intention of jumping ship - but the truth is that FF is now the default enthusiast format. With Sony, Nikon, Canon, Panasonic, Sigma and Leica at the party the pressure on Olympus to be in the same race will be enormous.

I think it's a mistake for Olympus if they don't produce an FF system. Of course this isn't good news for anyone heavily invested in mu43 - I don't think the long term future is assured at all.

OM USer
27th September 2018, 09:26 PM
I don't think I will be buying FF (either DSLR or mirrorless) anytime soon. The original Olympus SLR cameras were the right size for me; going digital the E-5 was not. In the mirrorless market the E-M5 was the perfect size as are most of the lenses; the E-M1 is too big. I now have a reasonable investement in Olympus MFT that would stop me switching at a whim even if the size & weight were right.

If Olympus were to enter the "FF" market then they would need a new sensor... and as has been said the major thing lacking at the moment in Oly MFT is a more up to date sensor so perhaps they don't have access to up to date sensor technology at the moment.

MJ224
27th September 2018, 09:27 PM
But have not Olympus always kicked the trend, since 1/2 frame film days...

Full Frame still means BIG lenses, and big bodies...…

Noise is the bete noire...………..

Not an expert...………..:(

Ross the fiddler
27th September 2018, 09:48 PM
I don't think I will be buying FF (either DSLR or mirrorless) anytime soon. The original Olympus SLR cameras were the right size for me; going digital the E-5 was not. In the mirrorless market the E-M5 was the perfect size as are most of the lenses; the E-M1 is too big. I now have a reasonable investement in Olympus MFT that would stop me switching at a whim even if the size & weight were right.

If Olympus were to enter the "FF" market then they would need a new sensor... and as has been said the major thing lacking at the moment in Oly MFT is a more up to date sensor so perhaps they don't have access to up to date sensor technology at the moment.

That is one thing that is expected to be improved on next year.
The 'trusty' Simon said this (in July),
"the new 6 axle stabi in MK III, that's another 30 % improvement over the current EM 1 MK II. Furthermore the new sensor does not bring a significant Mpx improvement, but in the ISO and low light range a real breakthrough."
This can be found in the comments here (https://www.43rumors.com/ft5-confirmed-new-olympus-super-high-end-camera-will-be-launched-in-very-early-2019/#disqus_thread) (a long way down).

So from his comments (including his other comments), an E-M1 Mk III will be coming 1st quarter 2019 with a 30% improved IS (Sync IS) with 6 axis (?) & the sensor not much difference in MP but significant improvement in low light & high ISO.

pdk42
28th September 2018, 01:22 PM
I think that noise and DR are the battlegrounds. I'm delighted with the output from my Oly gear most of the time, but nearly everything I shoot is at ISO 200. I know that once ISO climbs then I can't afford to be too critical or go pixel peeking. For some types of photography this doesn't cut it if you're after the best results (e.g. wildlife).

For me it's the DR that's the thing I'd most like to see improved. I shoot a lot of landscapes and for that you can never have too much DR. I very often shoot a 5-shot bracketed sequence (usually with the electronic shutter) and stack later. This is very effective for many shots, but it's got its limitations - e.g. on long exposures, when there's subject movement or where there's some other effect needed such as focus stacking (and yes, I've used focus stacking for landscape!). It's also more long-winded in post processing.

So, I'd be delighted if Oly has something up their sleeve next year that would improve noise and DR. I don't need more Mp - just more DR and improved higher ISO performance.

MJ224
28th September 2018, 02:34 PM
Better ISO performance is my LIKE. I limit my Em1 ii to 800 ISO for much of my stuff. It can go a lot higher if the light is good, and this allows faster shutter speeds. But lower light levels are not good meat to chew...…..*chr

OM USer
28th September 2018, 03:48 PM
How about if the next sensor was dual ISO at 100 and 1000 ??

MikeOxon
28th September 2018, 05:45 PM
I've not lost hope that we might see some more firmware enhancements for the E-M1 Mk ii. In another thread (http://e-group.uk.net/forum/showpost.php?p=458484&postcount=8http://), Graham-of-Rainham noted that the latest iPhones can simulate the wide-aperture, shallow depth-of-field look, which portrait photographers like so much.


It would surely not be difficult to add this capability to the Olympus in a firmware upgrade, through a modification of the focus-bracketing feature.


The 'Focos' software app. can already do this for any dual-camera iPhone and I show an example below:


http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/Focos-compare.jpg (http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/100387)

Ross the fiddler
29th September 2018, 01:32 AM
I've not lost hope that we might see some more firmware enhancements for the E-M1 Mk ii. In another thread (http://e-group.uk.net/forum/showpost.php?p=458484&postcount=8http://), Graham-of-Rainham noted that the latest iPhones can simulate the wide-aperture, shallow depth-of-field look, which portrait photographers like so much.


It would surely not be difficult to add this capability to the Olympus in a firmware upgrade, through a modification of the focus-bracketing feature.


The 'Focos' software app. can already do this for any dual-camera iPhone and I show an example below:


http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/Focos-compare.jpg (http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/100387)

If it came it would be an Art Filter. :rolleyes:

Phill D
29th September 2018, 05:54 AM
Those are interesting comments Paul. I too take most of my shots at iso200 and mainly landscapes. Having started my DSLR life with an E510 I still can't get out of the habit of dialling in a tad of -ve exposure compensation so as not to blow out the highlights even when the new cameras don't need it, Anyway it seems to me the DR has improved significantly since the E510 so what makes you crave for still more. I've no experience of FF so don't know what I'm missing I guess. If you have an image/images to illustrate what you'd like to see it would be great to see.

pdk42
29th September 2018, 08:07 AM
Those are interesting comments Paul. I too take most of my shots at iso200 and mainly landscapes. Having started my DSLR life with an E510 I still can't get out of the habit of dialling in a tad of -ve exposure compensation so as not to blow out the highlights even when the new cameras don't need it, Anyway it seems to me the DR has improved significantly since the E510 so what makes you crave for still more. I've no experience of FF so don't know what I'm missing I guess. If you have an image/images to illustrate what you'd like to see it would be great to see.
I don't have an FF camera anymore to compare Phil. However, a friend has a Nikon D810 and it would be fun to do some back- to- back comparisons. I may suggest it to him.

My past experience though is that whilst neither FF not m43 are going to handle the full DR of a bright summer's day, FF allows much more pushing of the shadows in PP and generally delivers a smoother gradation of tones in the final image. M43 in comparison looks punchier, but it's less faithful to the original scene. If I take a 5 EV burst and stack later (so stacking using raw files) I can see this improved tonality using my Olympus gear. Here's a simple example:

Single image, no PP:
http://www.famillekaye.com/NoStack_NoPP.jpg

Same single image, with highlights -100 and shadows +50 in LR:
http://www.famillekaye.com/NoStack_PP.jpg

Stack of 5EV exposure bracket sequence:
http://www.famillekaye.com/Stack.jpg

In my view, the last image shows a wider range of tones and looks closer to how my eye/brain saw the scene. I think FF gets closer to the last image without the need to bracket and stack.

Phill D
29th September 2018, 09:01 AM
Nice illustration Paul thanks and so fast a response wow very impressed. I see the level of effect you are talking about now. It's fairly subtle between the last two but I guess on a large pano shot where the detail matters, and possibly for printing large, then it would be worth the effort. It would be interesting to see a direct camera comparison plus a comparison with an Olympus high res image too. Feel free to take your time doing these though :).

Graham_of_Rainham
29th September 2018, 10:52 AM
...In my view, the last image shows a wider range of tones and looks closer to how my eye/brain saw the scene.

One of the biggest discussions, debates, arguments and even "learned works/theses" are on the subjective view of a scene in art and photography.

As we look at the sky, our eyes adjust to its brightness and likewise for the darker areas on the ground, we are unable to see the whole landscape with a fixed iris size, so our brain builds the picture from constantly changing signals...

Going back to the early darkroom days, we adjusted exposure of land and sky to give us what we perceive to be that which we saw or want to represent, in the same way the artist paints.

With the introduction of digital cameras, I have played with light meters and cameras to both determine the range of exposures in a scene and demonstrate to people how the cameras limitations can be balanced to what they want the image to look like.

I have tried (and may well do it again) to get a group from a camera club to all take the same picture and look at the variation of the exposure values that they get.

I get to see a lot of pictures and I see a lot of trends in the way images are processed to the end result. Seldom do I see many landscapes that look as natural as the ones you have posted, as the "trend" seems to have gone to the more saturated "graphic" style of image.

Certainly interesting to see the differences (although I did have to fire up the desktop PC as the iPad just didn't display them that well)

*chr

Ian
30th September 2018, 10:53 AM
My chat with Panasonic at the show was encouragingly positive for Micro Four Thirds. You do have to read between the lines a little bit (they are rather disparaging about APS-C - but of course they aren't an APS-C player).

There will be no reduction in commitment to Micro Four Thirds, of course as we all know FF lenses, even mirrorless ones, remain much larger and bulkier than MFT ones. Sensor development continues and is already much better than it used to be and Panasonic is evaluating new technologies like organic materials.

It's noticeable that Panasonic's FF body design eschews the trend followed by Sony, Nikon and Canon by not trying to be as tiny as possible. On the one hand this maintains a clear differentiation between its MFT and FF ranges but also that Panasonic feels that professionals don't necessarily want tiny bodies attached to necessarily big FF lenses.

Ian

Graham_of_Rainham
30th September 2018, 11:39 AM
Any "buzz" about the new Full Frame Samsung sensor that was rumoured to have been produced?

*chr

Ian
30th September 2018, 03:25 PM
Any "buzz" about the new Full Frame Samsung sensor that was rumoured to have been produced?

*chr

Nope. :D

Ian

RobEW
30th September 2018, 05:40 PM
On the question of dynamic range in landscapes, I quite often find I want more detail in the bright areas (usually sky) and also in the dark areas. Sometimes I find this nicely (and easily) improvable using in-camera HDR. Is this a philistine or beginner method which doesn't meet the level of refinement which some of you achieve? :-)

(I also sometimes use it in architecture shots when the sky would otherwise appear white. Maybe you can get more control by doing it in post processing but this method seems to give at least some advantage)

pdk42
30th September 2018, 06:52 PM
On the question of dynamic range in landscapes, I quite often find I want more detail in the bright areas (usually sky) and also in the dark areas. Sometimes I find this nicely (and easily) improvable using in-camera HDR. Is this a philistine or beginner method which doesn't meet the level of refinement which some of you achieve? :-)

(I also sometimes use it in architecture shots when the sky would otherwise appear white. Maybe you can get more control by doing it in post processing but this method seems to give at least some advantage)

The problem with the in-camera stacking modes Rob is that the end result is only JPEG. You can get much better results if you set the camera up to do a burst of bracketed shots in RAW and then stack later using Lightroom or your favourite PP program. I also use electronic shutter since (a) it's quieter, and (b) it's much faster - esp on the E-M1ii when you use the H burst mode (6- fps).

RobEW
30th September 2018, 08:00 PM
Yes, JPEG is a limitation if you want to do more post processing. I don't have Adobe programs and don't do a lot of PP. Mainly use DXO and a few features of Affinity. Never tried combining multiple RAWs in Affinity but I dare say it has this feature among its very many. Far too many to master, it seems, in a normal (non-obsessive) lifetime.

I use E-M1 classic, not Mark II. (Or occasionally E-M5 II, but Hi-Res or pocketability seem to be the only real reasons to prefer it).

An E-M1 III with better DR and better high ISO performance would seem a great prospect but almost certainly not one I could justify cost-wise.

drmarkf
1st October 2018, 10:36 PM
Interesting range of new m4/3 lenses from Laowa. They seem to think there's a future for the format *chr

Whispers suggest they're also working on a 9mm tilt-shift :D

https://www.ephotozine.com/article/venus-optics-laowa-4mm--12mm--17mm-hands-on-32788

RobEW
2nd October 2018, 05:48 AM
4mm fisheye! Can't imagine how wide that is. Even the 7mm end of my (FT) 7-14 seems pretty extreme. The 4mm looks more like a paperweight or a crystal ball than a lens.

9mm shift sounds exciting too, for certain architecture images at least. (Not so bothered about tilt; can't think why I'd want it.)

Ross the fiddler
2nd October 2018, 05:56 AM
4mm fisheye! Can't imagine how wide that is. Even the 7mm end of my (FT) 7-14 seems pretty extreme. The 4mm looks more like a paperweight or a crystal ball than a lens.

9mm shift sounds exciting too, for certain architecture images at least. (Not so bothered about tilt; can't think why I'd want it.)

I think I have this right, shift is for keystone adjustment & tilt is for plain of focus adjustment (as in 'tilting it'). Both would (could) be useful for architecture.

drmarkf
2nd October 2018, 08:25 AM
Laowa are also going to be producing lenses for the GFX range of medium format, 50Mp, Fujis. On the basis of the performance of my 7.5mm f2 for m4/3 I'd say they were currently rocking.

BTW, the recently announced GFX-50R looks very interesting for anyone wanting a serious 'large, slow, mega-detailed' body to add to a 'small, fast, adequately detailed' m4/3 system for things like landscape and studio work where the wonderful image-feel of medium format is unrivalled, and noticeably superior to what FF can achieve. Sure it's expensive, but it's way cheaper than anything else around, and I strongly suggest they'll make it very usable.

Internaut
4th October 2018, 08:02 PM
Laowa are also going to be producing lenses for the GFX range of medium format, 50Mp, Fujis. On the basis of the performance of my 7.5mm f2 for m4/3 I'd say they were currently rocking.

BTW, the recently announced GFX-50R looks very interesting for anyone wanting a serious 'large, slow, mega-detailed' body to add to a 'small, fast, adequately detailed' m4/3 system for things like landscape and studio work where the wonderful image-feel of medium format is unrivalled, and noticeably superior to what FF can achieve. Sure it's expensive, but it's way cheaper than anything else around, and I strongly suggest they'll make it very usable.

My first thought on seeing the the GFX-50R was “If I had that amount of money simply going spare”....