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View Full Version : Do we live in a mad world?


Naughty Nigel
19th July 2018, 03:00 PM
Do we live in a mad, mad world, or do we live in a mad, mad world??

Burberry burns bags, clothes and perfume worth millions (https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-44885983)

Burberry claim that they did this to 'protect their brand', but to me this is just crass and incredibly wasteful. The Burberry burning is just one example that we have been told about.

What would have been wrong with having an 'outlet store' like M&S, Denby, Roberts and others to sell off the products at more attractive prices?

I have never had any particular desire to buy Burberry products, but I shall make dammed sure that I don't now. :mad:

DerekW
19th July 2018, 04:09 PM
This type of thing was forecast many years ago by the likes of Vance Packard in his book "The Waste Makers" where he predicted that to keep the unit production price of a product down a high production volume would have to be maintained, large quantities of product would have to be scrapped to protect the product cost.

Also read his book "The Hidden Persuaders" that forecasts how advertising would develop and influence society.


During the later part of the 50's and early 60's copies of these books would be on the bookshelves of all earnest youngsters. Lots of quotes to impress your mates with.

Beagletorque
19th July 2018, 04:15 PM
I always delete 99.99% of my photos so I value the remaining 0.01% much more....

pdk42
19th July 2018, 04:39 PM
Reminds me of Douglas Adams and The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy where the Golgafinchams, having decided to use leaves as money, burn the trees down in autumn to prevent inflation.

Wally
19th July 2018, 06:15 PM
This type of thing was forecast many years ago by the likes of Vance Packard in his book "The Waste Makers" where he predicted that to keep the unit production price of a product down a high production volume would have to be maintained, large quantities of product would have to be scrapped to protect the product cost.


In another life working in accounts for a very large manufacturing company, one accountant expained how it was posible to break an egg and sell the next one on at an increased profit. Seems his slight of hand and snake oils sales pithes failed and he broke one too many eggs as a few years later, the company went into liquidation. It would seem that snobbery and robbery feed off each other in the race to keep up with the latest fashion items regardless of price.


If only I had taken up kicking a ball around instead of lugging spanners etc ;)

OM USer
19th July 2018, 06:30 PM
It just goes to show what we (mistakenly) value. There is an old saying about knowing the cost of something but the value of nothing.

Jim Ford
19th July 2018, 08:51 PM
I remember my parents telling me that in the 40s farmers in Kent had a glut of apples, and left them in carts by the roadside for people to help themselves. More recently ISTRC that surplus apples have been dumped in the sea.

Jim

OM USer
19th July 2018, 09:51 PM
I have just remembered the EU butter mountains and wine lake.

Naughty Nigel
20th July 2018, 07:26 AM
I have just remembered the EU butter mountains and wine lake.

Ahh yes; whatever happened to them I wonder?

Wasn't there a beef mountain as well?

I do seem to remember that there was a scheme where pensioners and maybe those out of work could obtain butter or beef at a reduced price, or even free as part of an EU scheme to reduce these mountains. This was in the late 1980's if I recall.

Sadly I was never invited to help shift the wine lake. :D

Zuiko
20th July 2018, 08:37 AM
Capitalism has sunk to a new low when protecting a company's pretentious image becomes worth more than the actual products. It comes to something when they would rather burn it than let it be used by someone who would not normally be able to afford it - perish the thought.

On the other hand maybe the value is all in the brand and the products are just cheap crap, relying on an image that puts style over substance?

Naughty Nigel
20th July 2018, 08:58 AM
On the other hand maybe the value is all in the brand and the products are just cheap crap, relying on an image that puts style over substance?

I think that is often the case John. Much of what we buy nowadays is overpriced crap with little intrinsic value, but the masses are consistently taken in by clever marketing and peer pressure.

Ultimately it seems to boil down to two problems: Firstly the financial markets expect relentless year-on-year growth irrespective of market conditions. Any failure to achieve this results in the plug being pulled.

The second is that manufacturing costs no longer determine how much products are sold for; no, it is all about 'what the market will stand'. This all started in the 1980's with CD's, which were much cheaper to produce than cassette tapes, but could be sold for three times the price.

If you look at popular consumer goods today we are surrounded by overpriced crap which only sells because it has a name, and Burberry is no exception.

Does it really cost more to build a BMW than a similar spec Hyundai, or to manufacture a iPhone than a Sony or Motorola? I think not, but there are millions of people who are willing to pay the extra because they think it sets them apart from the rest of the herd.

I blame Proletarian Drift. *yes

Keith-369
20th July 2018, 09:51 AM
but there are millions of people who are willing to pay the extra because they think it sets them apart from the rest of the herd.

And thus by doing so become one of the herd *yes *yes *yes

DerekW
20th July 2018, 09:56 AM
but a smaller herd

rather like the Oly users.

Naughty Nigel
20th July 2018, 10:00 AM
And thus by doing so become one of the herd *yes *yes *yes

Indeed. One example that is sometimes quoted is that large numbers of people bought 3 Series BMW's because it set them apart from those driving Vectras, Mondoeos and suchlike; but the end result is that the 3 Series is now far more common than the competition.



What is ... ‘Proletarian drift’?

WHO WOULD have imagined that sleek stretched limos could hurtle their way so quickly through the class system? Not very long ago they were associated with the outrageously well heeled. Now they are chiefly populated by gaggles of girls on hen nights, tanked up on cheap wine and greeting passers-by with lewd hand gestures. Stretch limos are an object lesson in the dangers of “proletarian drift”.

Proletarian drift describes the vulgarisation of once luxurious products and services as they slowly trickle their way down to the lower orders....

MJ224
20th July 2018, 11:41 AM
Is what you call "Life"...……

Get used to it. The mavericks of this world are not really to be admired. occasionally they are though. Whether they do more good that evil is debateable. Suspect we do need them, but the herd must has to have courage to sort them out. (Doubtful). Adolph, Joseph St, Kim Sung, amongst the worst, David Att, Nelson M, Isanbard amongst the best...………

Many other I know...………..

KeithL
25th July 2018, 02:29 PM
To answer your starting question: YES! ! ! And I'm not laughing...