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Ricoh
15th June 2018, 11:16 AM
Have we all gone just a bit too far with electronic gadgets, the iPad etc, relying on technology just a step too far?
Like Bruce Robbins http://www.theonlinedarkroom.com/2018/06/in-praise-of-filofax.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+TheOnlineDarkroom+%28The+Onli ne+Darkroom%29 I have my iPad stuffed with notes and I must admit to being a bit lazy when it comes to backing the device. Perhaps I should get myself a trusty Filofax and a biro. I like making notes, I'm at it all the time, but the trouble up 'til now I often can't remember where the notes are; enter the Filofax.
Anyone else having a Filo moment?

pdk42
15th June 2018, 12:33 PM
Have we all gone just a bit too far with electronic gadgets, the iPad etc, relying on technology just a step too far?
Like Bruce Robbins http://www.theonlinedarkroom.com/2018/06/in-praise-of-filofax.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+TheOnlineDarkroom+%28The+Onli ne+Darkroom%29 I have my iPad stuffed with notes and I must admit to being a bit lazy when it comes to backing the device. Perhaps I should get myself a trusty Filofax and a biro. I like making notes, I'm at it all the time, but the trouble up 'til now I often can't remember where the notes are; enter the Filofax.
Anyone else having a Filo moment?

At work, I've tried lots of electronic note-taking (iPad, Windows laptop, Windows tablet, Android phone), but I keep coming back to a good old-fashioned A4 hard-backed notebook. Searching not always the easiest, but way more accessible and much better still at being able to convey diagrams, text, stick-in material etc. I have a stack of them about a meter and a half high going back 20 years!

Graham_of_Rainham
15th June 2018, 12:34 PM
No Backup with a Filofax! When it's gone it's gone...

Cloud sync works very well.

Otto
15th June 2018, 12:43 PM
Never used a Filofax ...

MJ224
15th June 2018, 01:03 PM
Always have a pad and paper ready for notes...……….

But when I loose things, I am always surprised when I find them in a very logical place....but sometimes cannot remember that place...……..*chr:(

Ricoh
15th June 2018, 01:31 PM
At work, I've tried lots of electronic note-taking (iPad, Windows laptop, Windows tablet, Android phone), but I keep coming back to a good old-fashioned A4 hard-backed notebook. Searching not always the easiest, but way more accessible and much better still at being able to convey diagrams, text, stick-in material etc. I have a stack of them about a meter and a half high going back 20 years!
Although retired now, when I was employed it was mandatory to keep a written log book, an A4 book bound and serialised. I also had a 'yard' or more when stacked one on top of the other. Apart from the obvious benefit of note keeping, ie capturing the thought patterns leading to an outcome, it also developed discipline. I remember my boss asking to inspect my log book more than once.

Ricoh
15th June 2018, 01:33 PM
Always have a pad and paper ready for notes...……….

But when I loose things, I am always surprised when I find them in a very logical place....but sometimes cannot remember that place...……..*chr:(
Same here. I think my problem is that I have too many, each with a separate common theme.

Ricoh
15th June 2018, 01:38 PM
No Backup with a Filofax! When it's gone it's gone...

Cloud sync works very well.

Could use a scanner...

The 'cloud' by Jeez... I'll pass on that, thank you.

Naughty Nigel
15th June 2018, 09:42 PM
I have a very good memory for detail but appalling handwriting so I prefer to write up notes on my laptop, or on my iPad with Bluetooth keyboard. I do hand write some notes and scribbled diagrams using an Evidence Book, which I scan to PDF files.

The beauty of computerised notes is that they are very quick and easy to search.

One of the best things I did was to invest in a document scanner to scan the piles of letters, reports, data sheets and other information that I have gathered over the past twenty years or more, all of which is useful and relevant. By running OCR on these scanned documents the text is searchable, and can be copied and pasted into Word documents and so forth.

090657
15th June 2018, 10:31 PM
I use two diaries. One `week to view` based at home and one tiny diary i carry with me- both put in sync with a biro. Works for me. And very cheap to buy from The Works.

Jim Ford
16th June 2018, 09:15 AM
One of the best things I did was to invest in a document scanner to scan the piles of letters, reports, data sheets and other information that I have gathered over the past twenty years or more, all of which is useful and relevant. By running OCR on these scanned documents the text is searchable, and can be copied and pasted into Word documents and so forth.

I've photographed documents with my E5, cleaned up the images if necessary in PS and run an OCR program on them.

I've had mixed results from PDF files I've been sent, where the original is a page from a 50 year old archive, and the page wasn't flat. Sometimes the results have been rubbish.

Jim

OM USer
16th June 2018, 09:40 AM
A day per page A4 sized diary. Just tape in extra sheets if its a long meeting.

Ricoh
16th June 2018, 11:00 AM
One thing I like about the Filofax - it has the 'backspace' and 'delete' functions - ie unclip, bin-it, and start again.

wornish
16th June 2018, 12:41 PM
When I worked I always used a Time Manager, ( a variant of Filofax) It cured me of "Hapsy Flapsy" i.e carrying paperwork back and forward to work in a briefcase with good intention but never actually doing anything with it, plus helped me keep a clean desk i.e. no piles of paper on my desk in todo and pending piles. ( They are just distractions)

drmarkf
16th June 2018, 03:42 PM
Shortly before he retired, one of my most Luddite colleagues lost his Filofax.

He’d built it up over the years in to a 3” thick pack of resources and aides memoires, full of little gems that he was going to turn in to a practical handbook of clinical microbiology after he’d left work.

He’d absent-minded laid the volume half on his waste paper bin and half on a stack of books on the floor before going home. Naturally the departmental cleaner scooped it up in to the yellow plastic bag in the bin and sent it off to the site incinerator.

Hugo spent the following morning chasing the waste trail across the hospital, and opened hundreds of (nasty) yellow sacks waiting to be torched.

He never did find it.

Naughty Nigel
16th June 2018, 07:18 PM
I've photographed documents with my E5, cleaned up the images if necessary in PS and run an OCR program on them.

I've had mixed results from PDF files I've been sent, where the original is a page from a 50 year old archive, and the page wasn't flat. Sometimes the results have been rubbish.

Jim

OCR does rely on good scan quality. Fancy fonts tend to cause problems too. The Adobe OCR automatically straightens wonky pages too which is handy.

Jim Ford
16th June 2018, 10:08 PM
OCR does rely on good scan quality. Fancy fonts tend to cause problems too. The Adobe OCR automatically straightens wonky pages too which is handy.

Originals typed on a manual typewriter with a manky ribbon are also difficult.

Jim

TimP
22nd June 2018, 03:53 PM
I’m the first to enjoy technology, using iPad for lots of notes and stuff but I do worry we’re all headed for a huge fall by trusting all our ephemera to digital systems. Trusting to ‘the cloud’ is only as safe as any SLA in place and to quote others, when it’s gone it’s gone.
You’d be able to shout all you like at a cloud provider who lost your data but it wouldn’t get it back and any compensation would be a fat lot of good for irreplaceable data.

I backup everything and as years pass I move those backups from one out of date media type to a current one but still I worry about losing stuff. I wonder how many businesses would be put in danger if internet links were lost, even for a day. We’ve seen something like that in recent weeks with the Visa banking outage. I blame the millennials for putting too much trust in tech!
Sorry for ranting at what I enjoyed reading as a lighthearted thread. I’ve still got an old Filofax and not having looked at it for probably 20 plus years it will be good to thumb through it again. Can’t say the same about all those BBC Micro 5.25 in floppies though!

Naughty Nigel
22nd June 2018, 04:25 PM
You’d be able to shout all you like at a cloud provider who lost your data...

Shout at your cloud provider?

You would be lucky to find a telephone number that worked, let alone have a human being pick the phone up! :mad:

However, you raise an interesting point about backups and compatibility.

After using several backup systems that suddenly disappeared off of the planet I have been using these things for about the past fifteen years. They always work and are always available, with the original LTO 2 still made, and they still keep coming!



https://filmmakermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/LTO-6-tape-cartridge.jpg


Better still they can read and write phenomenal amounts of data at speeds similar to an SSD but are remarkably cheap to buy. (The drives, however, are pricey.)

TimP
22nd June 2018, 11:17 PM
I’ve looked at LTO (had access to free tapes) but decided against as the tape or drive will fail when least expected! (I’m lucky like that!)
I’ve lost track of all the various consumer and enterprise tape systems I’ve trusted my data to over the years and optical media and spinning rust has always come out on top.
I wonder how many people with tapes have ever actually tried a test restore to be sure it works and all the expected data is there? Rust based media never inspires much confidence but I figure by regularly updating to new devices you at least cut down the risk. I found some 20 yr old CDs, many of which wouldn’t read until I’d washed off a strange dull and patchy film that seemed to affect a good number of them, then they worked perfectly, so I copied off the data (to multiple new spinning rust) and popped ‘em back in ‘storage’, hopefully for another 20 years, if not another bout of clean hot soapy washing up water and a good rubbing should sort it.

Jim Ford
23rd June 2018, 08:36 AM
I've got an old Fuji magneto-optical drive. The media are said to be extremely reliable, but I guess the drive is the weak point. It's only the size of a 3.5 inch floppy drive. Main problems is that it's only 350 Meg capacity.

Jim

TimP
23rd June 2018, 04:52 PM
Yes, drive definitely the weak point. Wasn’t there a story recently about NASA needing to scrounge around to find a tape drive to restore some old tapes to rescue a mission?

I’ve got boxes of old 5.25 and 3.5in media but no easy way to read ‘em anymore. Might be a project for a winters day.

Naughty Nigel
25th June 2018, 08:05 AM
I’ve looked at LTO (had access to free tapes) but decided against as the tape or drive will fail when least expected! (I’m lucky like that!)
I’ve lost track of all the various consumer and enterprise tape systems I’ve trusted my data to over the years and optical media and spinning rust has always come out on top.
I wonder how many people with tapes have ever actually tried a test restore to be sure it works and all the expected data is there? Rust based media never inspires much confidence but I figure by regularly updating to new devices you at least cut down the risk. I found some 20 yr old CDs, many of which wouldn’t read until I’d washed off a strange dull and patchy film that seemed to affect a good number of them, then they worked perfectly, so I copied off the data (to multiple new spinning rust) and popped ‘em back in ‘storage’, hopefully for another 20 years, if not another bout of clean hot soapy washing up water and a good rubbing should sort it.


The strange 'film' on your CD's was probably plasticiser; a material added to plastics to keep them, well, plastic. More importantly, plasticisers maintain some flexibility in otherwise hard plastics by stretching their long chain molecules apart, but plasticisers leach out with time leaving the plastic hard and brittle.

Rewritable and RW CD's are not reckoned to be good for archiving material because they are susceptible to all sorts of damage including scratching and particularly sunlight, which wipes them clean. DVD's are even more sensitive.

As for LTO tapes, I have tried restoring from them and they have saved my life more than once! Indeed, I have been very impressed by their performance and reliability over the years. Of course the strength of any backup system is that you don't have just one copy backup but several.

I have had a couple of tapes fail. They could be read but would not allow further data to be written. After interrogating the suspect I strongly believe that, contrary to clear instructions, the tapes were put too close to a mobile phone, (i.e. in the same handbag). :rolleyes:

As always, operator error is always the greatest risk.

The only mechanical failure was in my very first LTO2 drive, which became unreliable earlier this year and was pensioned off. However, it was fifteen years old and had run for 13,000 hours and had in excess of 6,000 tape cartridges put through it during its lifetime. I could have it repaired but we have moved to bigger drives now.

Crucially though, I could have bought a brand new replacement off the shelf, at a cost, which to me would be a small price to get my data back.

However, we now use LTO3 and LTO4 for day to day use, with LTO6 used as needed for bulk backups and archiving. The beauty of the system is that LTO drives will read and write to previous generation tapes, and read only from two generations back, so natural progression means that I can still read tapes written fifteen years ago, which to me is pretty good for anything IT wise.

LTO is also cross platform. The only major change has been from the SCSI interface, which is still available, to the faster, less flaky, plug n play SAS.