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View Full Version : Surely they could have left the sunset mode alone!


Phill D
2nd April 2017, 06:49 PM
Just realised that all the scene modes have gone! OK I know it's a pro camera but there are some of us dummies who actually used to use them. Well the sunset one anyway. It was really easy when I was rushing to grab a sunset to just switch the camera to sunset and know I'd get a pretty impressive result. To be honest I never managed to get a better sunset image using my own settings on my mk1 than I could using the sunset mode. OK maybe i'm inept but it was so easy before. Now I've got to spend time working out how to recreate olympus's excellent sunset settings. Sorry I don't call that progress. It's only a minor whinge I guess but if only Olympus could add their old sunset scene mode back via a firmware mod say as an extra art filter I'd be really chuffed. In the meantime if anyone can suggest suitable sunset settings feel free. Whinge over....:rolleyes:

Zuiko
3rd April 2017, 08:41 AM
One tip, Phill, and I don't know if this was part of the sunset mode, is to set the white balance manually to 5600K (daylight). This should enhance the warm tones which, if left to AWB, the camera may try to render more neutrally. This can also be adjusted manually when processing a raw file, of course.

Phill D
3rd April 2017, 02:37 PM
That's just the sort of tip I'm after John thanks.
If I knew what settings Olympus used then maybe I could set them up as one of the Myset functions?

andym
3rd April 2017, 02:44 PM
Phill

I you haven't got it try downloading the now free NIK collection.

https://www.google.com/nikcollection/

In Colour EFEX Pro I find the sunset preset recipe works very well for this sort of thing. The great thing about is it processes your images as a layer so you can play about with the opacity etc.

Ricoh
3rd April 2017, 03:49 PM
Best to do a custom white balance if a JPEG person, or take a shot of an X-Rite Color checker in the same light. Applying correction in post without a reference is guesswork.

RogerMac
3rd April 2017, 03:53 PM
For what it's worth I always set the WB to daylight, and exposure compensation to one stop under exposed, adjusting that after chimping. Incidentally I prefer the E5's rending of sunsets to my Canon gear and would pick up the Oly for choice if I was on a specialist sunset outing.

Mrs T
3rd April 2017, 07:43 PM
I did notice they had gone the other week when I wanted to use the panorama setting! Not good! As Phill D says they are convenient.

Growltiger
3rd April 2017, 08:50 PM
Best to do a custom white balance if a JPEG person, or take a shot of an X-Rite Color checker in the same light. Applying correction in post without a reference is guesswork.

This is exactly what won't work. What it would do is make a photo that is grey, since it would neutralise the warm sunset colour. A similar result will come from using Auto WB.

Instead you need to set the colour balance to normal daylight, so that the red - compared to normal light - is maintained.

DerekW
3rd April 2017, 10:00 PM
I under expose by a varying amount and then use a preset in Lightroom that gives a graduated orange hue over the sky if required.

pdk42
3rd April 2017, 10:41 PM
Ha - I read the title and thought it was an April fool joke! I never realised that there was a "sunset mode" option. Personally I only ever shoot raw so I can make the WB whatever I want it to be later. I can also adjust the exposure more reliably too. I can't remember the last time I used JPEG and didn't get badly disappointed with the result.

drmarkf
3rd April 2017, 11:37 PM
Ha - I read the title and thought it was an April fool joke! I never realised that there was a "sunset mode" option. Personally I only ever shoot raw so I can make the WB whatever I want it to be later. I can also adjust the exposure more reliably too. I can't remember the last time I used JPEG and didn't get badly disappointed with the result.

Indeed, although Olympus and Fuji get closer than most (I do like the Fuji Classic Chrome colour jpg preset).

I had a good look at Gordon Laing's new book 'In Camera' at the NEC. The underlying ethos is that it's possible to produce great images entirely in camera with jpgs and with no PP at all. Nice idea, but unfortunately although this is a nice book for beginners, image after image is just a bit dull and postcardy. I've got enormous respect for Gordon, but he's unconvincing here.

Ricoh
3rd April 2017, 11:41 PM
This is exactly what won't work. What it would do is make a photo that is grey, since it would neutralise the warm sunset colour. A similar result will come from using Auto WB.

Instead you need to set the colour balance to normal daylight, so that the red - compared to normal light - is maintained.
Make it grey, surely not. Check out tutorials on colour management. I encourage you.

Ross the fiddler
4th April 2017, 01:44 AM
Phil, I would suggest going back to your E-M1 (Mk I) to check the settings for Sunset in SCP (needs to be ticked in Scenes) & pressing [OK] & followed by [Info] the settings should show in the Live SCP. These settings could then be noted & applied to your Mk II camera & stored in one of the Custom settings on the Mode dial.

wornish
4th April 2017, 08:01 AM
If you just shoot in RAW you can adjust the image in post processing to achieve the desired WB and toning. There are lots of presets for Lightroom and other software packages that let you try all sorts of effects.

I can understand that for film its best to get it as near as possible to what you want but its no longer necessary in the digital age. It is not cheating to do more in post processing.

Phill D
4th April 2017, 08:05 AM
Thanks for all the help everyone, nice to know I'm not the only one who misses the sunset mode. Point taken Paul and Dave, one day maybe I'll work more with the Raw files but currently I find it just too much hassle.
Ross that was going to be my next step but when I tried it many moons ago to see if I could get an equivalent shot manually to Olys mode settings I couldn't quite get there. I had a suspicion they had tweaked something I couldn't get to. But that was on an old E510 I think. Anyhow will definitely have to have a go. Surely it would be an easy firmware mod for Olympus though just to add the settings back under the art filters. Although for me the arty ones could go! oh that's probably another can of worms :)

Ross the fiddler
4th April 2017, 10:32 AM
Thanks for all the help everyone, nice to know I'm not the only one who misses the sunset mode. Point taken Paul and Dave, one day maybe I'll work more with the Raw files but currently I find it just too much hassle.
Ross that was going to be my next step but when I tried it many moons ago to see if I could get an equivalent shot manually to Olys mode settings I couldn't quite get there. I had a suspicion they had tweaked something I couldn't get to. But that was on an old E510 I think. Anyhow will definitely have to have a go. Surely it would be an easy firmware mod for Olympus though just to add the settings back under the art filters. Although for me the arty ones could go! oh that's probably another can of worms :)

I would also suggest to save raw as well as JPEG & then you can always use it if needed or desired some time later.

Growltiger
4th April 2017, 02:19 PM
Make it grey, surely not. Check out tutorials on colour management. I encourage you.
I will attempt to explain it better. I do know a bit about colour management already and do have a color checker.

Imagine you are photographing someone outdoors. It is afternoon. You use the color checker.
Then the sun begins to set. The person's face becomes redder and redder in the sunset. You use the color checker again.

Now you are processing the photos. Using the color checker you get the perfect skin tones in the afternoon.
Next you have the sunset shot. The image is of course redder, but you use the color checker and the colours return to normal, you still achieve perfect standard skin tones, they are no longer too red. Exactly what you want in this case.

To achieve those standard skin tones, the extra red has been removed from the image. That is what you normally want. But in the case of photographing a sunset the aim is quite different, you need to retain or even enhance the extra red, not remove it (which leaves a grey sky). So you don't use the color checker, you set white balance to standard daylight, and as a result the image is lovely and red.

Phill D
4th April 2017, 05:27 PM
I've started to save jpeg and raw Ross just in case you must be telepathic :)
Growltiger I'm sure your explanation is fine l just need to improve my knowledge to understand it.