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RobEW
19th March 2017, 05:22 PM
I keep getting frustrated trying to find a suitable viewpoint to capture images of interesting buildings, especially in town centres. There's so often clutter in the way at ground level - waste bins, A-boards, post boxes, and so on. And often the ground floor of a building is rather spoilt by gaudy shop fronts, and you don't want that at the centre of your composition if at all. And if you point the camera up at the interesting parts you get perspective distortion as well.

I often wish I had a ladder or a cherry picker to get above the clutter and see the higher floors of buildings straight on, not upwards, and with street level artefacts out of the view or less prominent in it. I know that keystone compensation in post processing can tidy up a bit of perspective distortion, and shift lenses can also help, and occasionally photographing from further away with a telephoto can help, but none of these can create the same effect as framing the composition from higher up. So I have a bright idea.

I'm not an inventor so I have no idea whether or how it's possible, but here's what I'd like. Some kind of hugely upward extending kind of tripod, with motor driven adjustments to move the camera up and down, forward and backward, left and right, and also to rotate in three directions: twisting around vertical centre line of the sensor, tilting along the horizontal centre line of the sensor, and controlled spinning along a horizontal line at right angles to the sensor and going through its centre point. Then I want an app on my phone to control all of these movements from below, and an enhanced Olympus app to control zoom, focus (manual and auto), exposure parameters and all other camera menu features, and of course to do shutter release.

It would be nice wouldn't it? :-)

wornish
19th March 2017, 06:05 PM
You could use a quad copter (drone) to carry your Oly.

DerekW
19th March 2017, 11:00 PM
You are too late - telescopic supports for cameras have been available for years and used by surveyors and estate agents, now replaced by drones.

See some of the ways in use in this advert

http://highlevelphotography.co.uk/

RobEW
19th March 2017, 11:24 PM
You are too late - telescopic supports for cameras have been available for years and used by surveyors and estate agents, now replaced by drones.

See some of the ways in use in this advert

http://highlevelphotography.co.uk/

Then I guess my idea is a bit like their second option: "mast/pole". It's not clear what sort of features that would have ...

sapper
20th March 2017, 07:44 AM
I often wish I had a ladder or a cherry picker to get above the clutter and see the higher floors of buildings straight on, not upwards, and with street level artefacts out of the view or less prominent in it.
I'm not an inventor so I have no idea whether or how it's possible, but here's what I'd like. Some kind of hugely upward extending kind of tripod, with motor driven adjustments to move the camera up and down, forward and backward, left and right, and also to rotate in three directions: twisting around vertical centre line of the sensor, tilting along the horizontal centre line of the sensor, and controlled spinning along a horizontal line at right angles to the sensor and going through its centre point. Then I want an app on my phone to control all of these movements from below, and an enhanced Olympus app to control zoom, focus (manual and auto), exposure parameters and all other camera menu features, and of course to do shutter release.

It would be nice wouldn't it? :-)

Not sure this would work like a shift lens. A shift lens moves only a few mm but make a massive difference.

Beagletorque
20th March 2017, 08:56 AM
I got a carp pole that I cut and put an arca clamp on the top. Nice and light and closes down to a reasonable height. With the oly app it's a good combination. I also adapted an old tripod to hold it and allow rotation for panoramas.

Zuiko
20th March 2017, 09:23 AM
I got a carp pole that I cut and put an arca clamp on the top. Nice and light and closes down to a reasonable height. With the oly app it's a good combination. I also adapted an old tripod to hold it and allow rotation for panoramas.

Carp pole? Sounds a bit fishy to me, Andrew!

benvendetta
20th March 2017, 12:21 PM
I keep getting frustrated trying to find a suitable viewpoint to capture images of interesting buildings, especially in town centres. There's so often clutter in the way at ground level - waste bins, A-boards, post boxes, and so on. And often the ground floor of a building is rather spoilt by gaudy shop fronts, and you don't want that at the centre of your composition if at all. And if you point the camera up at the interesting parts you get perspective distortion as well.

I often wish I had a ladder or a cherry picker to get above the clutter and see the higher floors of buildings straight on, not upwards, and with street level artefacts out of the view or less prominent in it. I know that keystone compensation in post processing can tidy up a bit of perspective distortion, and shift lenses can also help, and occasionally photographing from further away with a telephoto can help, but none of these can create the same effect as framing the composition from higher up. So I have a bright idea.

I'm not an inventor so I have no idea whether or how it's possible, but here's what I'd like. Some kind of hugely upward extending kind of tripod, with motor driven adjustments to move the camera up and down, forward and backward, left and right, and also to rotate in three directions: twisting around vertical centre line of the sensor, tilting along the horizontal centre line of the sensor, and controlled spinning along a horizontal line at right angles to the sensor and going through its centre point. Then I want an app on my phone to control all of these movements from below, and an enhanced Olympus app to control zoom, focus (manual and auto), exposure parameters and all other camera menu features, and of course to do shutter release.

It would be nice wouldn't it? :-)

You could try making the most of the opportunities that stuff at street level can give to your images rather than trying to avoid them completely. That's what I do when they present themselves.

Beagletorque
20th March 2017, 01:16 PM
Carp pole? Sounds a bit fishy to me, Andrew!

Boom, boom!! ;)

Naughty Nigel
20th March 2017, 03:31 PM
Boom, boom!! ;)

Boom, boom. That must be 'pun of the week'! :)

Beagletorque
20th March 2017, 04:30 PM
Boom, boom. That must be 'pun of the week'! :)

Thank-you! :D

RobEW
20th March 2017, 06:15 PM
Not sure this would work like a shift lens. A shift lens moves only a few mm but make a massive difference.

I confess I don't know a lot about shift lenses, but I do know a little about light not travelling round bends. If you change your position, either sideways or up and down, different things can come into view. A shift lens can reduce or eliminate perspective distortions (I suspect that's what it does) but it can't lead to images of things from which light doesn't reach it.
An example - if a building has outdoor windowsills which are patterned on top, then only a high viewpoint will show those patterns on - say - second floor windowsills.

RobEW
20th March 2017, 06:17 PM
Carp pole? Sounds a bit fishy to me, Andrew!

Best used in conjunction with a little tuna I expect ...

Petrochemist
20th March 2017, 06:29 PM
Not sure this would work like a shift lens. A shift lens moves only a few mm but make a massive difference.
Well the shift is usually used to show an undistorted image with framing similar to that from higher up. Moving the camera up does achieve much the same result.:)

RobEW
20th March 2017, 11:02 PM
Well the shift is usually used to show an undistorted image with framing similar to that from higher up. Moving the camera up does achieve much the same result.:)

Sorry to disagree but moving the camera up achieves a different result. E.g. my comment about windowsills. I think if the scene were all on a perfectly flat vertical surface then a shift lens may give largely the same result as a higher viewpoint.

Petrochemist
21st March 2017, 10:24 AM
Sorry to disagree but moving the camera up achieves a different result. E.g. my comment about windowsills. I think if the scene were all on a perfectly flat vertical surface then a shift lens may give largely the same result as a higher viewpoint.

My claim was not for identical results but MUCH THE SAME. There will be minor differences such as the tops of window sills & perhaps a different view in through the windows... Shift lenses are primarily used to prevent the distortion caused by tilting a wide lend up. That's a significant factor in many building shots.

Mast photography would allow photography over the top of foreground items, so may have significant advantages in many cases. I wouldn't want to try using it to get a central view of a skyscraper, shift would still win for that :)

Fitting a camera to the top of a spare windsurfer mast is something I've been contemplating for years (before drones where readily available). I'll probably never get round to it. I think it may have been this website (http://www.armadale.org.uk/pole.htm)that prompted the idea, but Companies like High level photography have been using masts since at least 1985.

Naughty Nigel
21st March 2017, 10:06 PM
Sorry to disagree but moving the camera up achieves a different result. E.g. my comment about windowsills. I think if the scene were all on a perfectly flat vertical surface then a shift lens may give largely the same result as a higher viewpoint.

That all depends on how tall the object or building is.

Shift lenses are used to correct converging verticals when tall buildings are photographed at close range; especially with wide angle lenses. Perspective correction may also be applied in Photoshop.

Taking a photograph from a higher viewpoint might help, but if the building is very tall its verticals may appear to converge both above and below the camera's viewpoint.

Of course this effect can be avoided by taking the photograph from a greater distance, but many tall buildings , such as those in London are sandwiched tight between other, equally tall buildings!

Harold Gough
24th March 2017, 12:59 PM
surveyors and estate agents, now replaced by drones.

Drones (as in bees) are defined as doing no work. So no change after all? ;)

Harold

Harold Gough
24th March 2017, 01:01 PM
I keep getting frustrated trying to find a suitable viewpoint to capture images of interesting buildings, especially in town centres. There's so often clutter in the way at ground level - waste bins, A-boards, post boxes, and so on. And often the ground floor of a building is rather spoilt by gaudy shop fronts, and you don't want that at the centre of your composition if at all. And if you point the camera up at the interesting parts you get perspective distortion as well.

I often wish I had a ladder or a cherry picker to get above the clutter and see the higher floors of buildings straight on, not upwards, and with street level artefacts out of the view or less prominent in it. I know that keystone compensation in post processing can tidy up a bit of perspective distortion, and shift lenses can also help, and occasionally photographing from further away with a telephoto can help, but none of these can create the same effect as framing the composition from higher up. So I have a bright idea.

I'm not an inventor so I have no idea whether or how it's possible, but here's what I'd like. Some kind of hugely upward extending kind of tripod, with motor driven adjustments to move the camera up and down, forward and backward, left and right, and also to rotate in three directions: twisting around vertical centre line of the sensor, tilting along the horizontal centre line of the sensor, and controlled spinning along a horizontal line at right angles to the sensor and going through its centre point. Then I want an app on my phone to control all of these movements from below, and an enhanced Olympus app to control zoom, focus (manual and auto), exposure parameters and all other camera menu features, and of course to do shutter release.

It would be nice wouldn't it? :-)

If you want a truly unique point of view, get a Trump!:D

Harold

Naughty Nigel
24th March 2017, 01:09 PM
Drones (as in bees) are defined as doing no work. So no change after all? ;)

Harold

Most Estate Agents seem to have moved to Employment Agencies, where they do even less work. :mad:

Harold Gough
24th March 2017, 01:18 PM
You could climb to the top or the building and lower yourself on a rope (abseil). As a rockclimber might put it, "why don't you ab off?"

Harold