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Wally
1st March 2017, 02:15 PM
Can anyone help in giving advice on Disk Utility copy type software? Am looking to migrate from a bog standard mechanical disk with a capacity of 1Tb and put it onto an SSD 500Gb capacity disk. More than likely to include more than one partition.

There seems to be problems with certain versions and have ended up going down a dark smelly tunnel with no light at the end. ;)

Thanks in advance.

Graham_of_Rainham
1st March 2017, 02:37 PM
I'd advise you to do a clean install. There is likely to be fragments of stuff all over the hard drive. It may take a bit longer, but at least it will be a fresh starting point.

good luck.

snaarman
1st March 2017, 02:38 PM
My Kingston SSD came with a voucher for Acronis True Image OEM.

That seemed to work for me (Windows 7) but I wasn't being clever with partitions. It reverts to good old Dos like screens in order to do the job, but it does work.

Pete

OM USer
1st March 2017, 04:09 PM
I use a linux boot USB for this sort of thing. My current one is Debian Live. You download and expand a compressed image and then copy the files to your USB, and then run a small utility (now on the USB) to make it bootable. Debian Live comes with a graphical interface with a graphical partition program and a disk to image (and disk to disk) program. You may need to enter the boot setup on your machine to enable USB boot and disable secure boot so that the FAT32 USB can boot the machine. Plug it in, power on the machine, and hit the appropriate function key to select the boot device.

By booting from a seperate media you have no problems with copying locked files. I have quite a sophisticated setup with a 2TB portable drive partitioned into 2 so that I can boot from the 4GB partition and use the second partition to hold disk image backups.

As you can't move 1TB to 500GB you need to shrink the 1TB to 500GB first!

If this is a windows machine W8 or later then reinstallation should be easy as Microsoft will hold the product key for the operating system. An OEM windows disk will contain all sorts of partitions for initial install and recovery. Although the installed OS should work after moving, the recovery partition may not work. Moving the OS on a windows notepad is also problematical as to save disk space the OS partition has links to compressed files on the recovery partition rather real files.

pault
1st March 2017, 04:09 PM
I use Super Duper. Copied mirror image to new drive, inserted new drive into computer, and it just worked.

Jim Ford
1st March 2017, 04:51 PM
I use a linux boot USB for this sort of thing. My current one is Debian Live.

I use the Linux distribution 'Knoppix':

http://knopper.net/knoppix/index-en.html

It's easy to run from a bootable USB stick and has a nice interface. I carry one in my pocket all the time, in case of emergencies.

Jim

shenstone
1st March 2017, 09:40 PM
Moving back to the original question you did not say what OS so I am going to presume windows 7 or above

I bought one of these Kits http://www.maplin.co.uk/p/sandisk-ssd-conversion-kit-a75lu it came with the cables you need and SW which I have used on Win7,8, 10) I note that it is discontinued, but sandisk still do something similar https://www.sandisk.co.uk/home/ssd/ssd-notebook-upgrade-kit

Since win7 you don't need external SW to resize a partition https://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/756.resizing-and-creating-partitions-in-windows-7.aspx

Regards
Andy

dcbrookes
1st March 2017, 10:00 PM
I recommend Macrium Reflect, which is commercial software but free for home use. It is also excellent for creating regular backup disk images.

David

Otto
2nd March 2017, 09:13 AM
Another vote for Macrium Reflect, it's saved my life on at least one occasion.
https://www.macrium.com/

Naughty Nigel
3rd March 2017, 11:47 AM
You don't need any special software at all.

Firstly, defrag the hard drive so that all of the data is packed together and not scattered across the platter. It would also help to delete or Ctrl-X off any unnecessary files, especially large image files before defragging.

Secondly, go into Disk Management and reduce to partition size to something smaller than your new hard drive. You will not be able to do this without defragging first.

Thirdly, create a Windows Disk Image using your new, reduced hard drive, and create an emergency restore disk when prompted.

Fourthly, install your new drive, set the machine to boot from your chosen media.

Finally, restore your disk image as prompted. Everything should be exactly as you left it, but much quicker. You will also have your old hard drive as a backup.

You may want to expand your new partition to fill the available space, or else create a new partition and logical drive.

Adagio
3rd March 2017, 05:47 PM
Buy a Samsung SSD and their free Magician software will copy your existing boot drive to the new one.

Wally
4th March 2017, 09:45 AM
Apologies for not getting back sooner... RL issues had to take priority.

My thanks to all who replied and, yes, :o I should have mentioned the OS - 3 guesses and the first two don't count? ;)

:tup Thanks Adagio *chr Problem was resolved using the 'Samsung Magician Software' for which I had misplaced and had forgot all about it.

There are times when old age becomes a liability rather than an asset. Now, if we could just reboot from a previous backup of the brain, preferrably from when I was a teen-ager and knew everything, all would be good. *yes

Naughty Nigel
4th March 2017, 05:23 PM
There are times when old age becomes a liability rather than an asset. Now, if we could just reboot from a previous backup of the brain, preferrably from when I was a teen-ager and knew everything, all would be good. *yes

Teenagers might know everything, but they have to Google for the answers! :D