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pandora
1st March 2017, 08:27 AM
The building on the right is the original Barrow Creek Telegraph Station,
one of a number of repeater stations that transmitted morse code signals along a single strand of wire
3,200km long, from Adelaide to Darwin and via undersea cable linking Australia to the rest of the world.

Barrow Creek has a somewhat bleak history. In 1874 the station was attacked
by aboriginals over a disputed waterhole and the two station operators were killed, which sparked a reprisal
in which many nearby aboriginals were shot dead by police.

In 2001 Barrow Creek became the focus of world attention over the grizzly murder of Peter Falconio,
a UK tourist travelling with his girlfriend, Joanne Lees who has recently returned to Barrow Creek
on a quest to find the remains of Peter whose body has never been found.

Curiously in researching the Overland Telegraph Line I was unable to find
any mention of precisely how many repeater stations there were in the chain.
I have been able to identify six only other locations but I'm sure there must have been more.

It was in the light of Barrow Creek's colourful history that my inspiration for this painting arose.

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/Barrow_Creek_Telegraph_Station_Forum.jpg (http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/92050)
The long sweep of the Stuart Highway (2,834km) below links Adelaide to Darwin where all dem man eatin' crocodiles am. :eek:

Phill D
1st March 2017, 08:47 AM
Mark another cracker, you've definitely established your style. Interesting to see that you resisted what must have been a temptation to leave out the solar panels. I'm glad you kept them in.

Beagletorque
1st March 2017, 10:16 AM
Excellent rendering Mark. And a very interesting history regarding the telegraph. Is dem solar panels?

http://www.jazclass.aust.com/blog/photos81/blog731p.htm

http://www.southaustralianhistory.com.au/repeaterstations.htm

OM USer
1st March 2017, 01:59 PM
Your art work never ceases to amaze mark.

pandora
1st March 2017, 04:32 PM
Excellent rendering Mark. And a very interesting history regarding the telegraph. Is dem solar panels?

http://www.jazclass.aust.com/blog/photos81/blog731p.htm

http://www.southaustralianhistory.com.au/repeaterstations.htm
Thanks for the links, Andrew. Your research is better than mine. I now know there were 11 Telegraph Stations in the chain.
During my 2014 safari I made a point of visiting three of them. As far as I know these are the only ones standing.
Yes, dem is solar panels you see, Barrow Creek would have no power without them.

ALICE SPRINGS TELEGRAPH STATION (ALL IMAGES E3 + 12-60mm)
http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/Alice_Springs_TS.jpg (http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/92051)

TENNANT CREEK TELEGRAPH STATION (+ termite mounds)
http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/Tennant_Creek_TS.jpg (http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/92052)

BARROW CREEK TS
http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/Barrow_Creek_TS.jpg (http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/92053)

Mark another cracker, you've definitely established your style. Interesting to see that you resisted what must have been a temptation to leave out the solar panels. I'm glad you kept them in.
Thanks Phill. No temptation at all to omit the solar panels, they are part of the outpost's mojo as it is today.

Your art work never ceases to amaze mark.
Thanks OM. Artwork is tad slower than the split second it takes to shoot reference photos.

MJ224
1st March 2017, 05:13 PM
The painting is a great interpretation of the scene.

very good...

Mrs T
1st March 2017, 08:22 PM
A great painting Mark, and a very good representation of the original. A fascinating history to go with it.

Phill D
2nd March 2017, 07:57 AM
Mark I like the photographic image too. Interesting to see how the mountains move about in the distance ;)

pandora
2nd March 2017, 11:55 AM
The painting is a great interpretation of the scene.
very good...Thanks, Mark. *chr

A great painting Mark, and a very good representation of the original. A fascinating history to go with it.
Glad you enjoyed it, Amanda. :)

Mark I like the photographic image too. Interesting to see how the mountains move about in the distance ;)
As we know, Faith can move mountains, Phill. *yes O:)
Actually they do exist and are an iconic landmark on the northern approach to the settlement.
They were necessary to balance the composition and are part of its charm. Artist's licence prevails over photography! :D

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/P8120001.JPG (http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/92055)

Wee man
2nd March 2017, 10:50 PM
Nice one Mark made more so that you left your camera interpretation until after I had a good look at your art work.

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk

pandora
3rd March 2017, 06:46 AM
Thanks Ed. Photography to painting is a mean transition - difficult developing one's own artstic laguage after a lifetime of pixel peeping.

DerekW
3rd March 2017, 10:00 AM
It is interesting Mark that you have developed a style that defines the images in a series of planes of colour (pixels).

I have enjoyed this style / method in some paintings from New Mexico.

pandora
3rd March 2017, 10:41 AM
Thank you Derek for an astute observation, I can't say that I consciously set out to paint in colour pixels as you put it but I see what you mean. Colours to me are like musical notes that when sung should be clear and distinct, not slurred one into another. Certain colours can be transitioned into another to create a blend.

iso
3rd March 2017, 06:55 PM
It is interesting Mark that you have developed a style that defines the images in a series of planes of colour (pixels).

I have enjoyed this style / method in some paintings from New Mexico.

D'u'know Mark, it's a technique that reminds me of that great era of 20's/30's UK Railway Publicity Posters. Art Deco sort of, but in your interpretation, not so flat a colour. Love them

pandora
3rd March 2017, 10:57 PM
I loved that Art Deco period mysel Derek, in 1935 I was born right into it. Indeed my firsr art training was by correspondence at age 12 I think. My dear mother who was the first (and the last) to recognise the artistic genius residing in her young hair-brained son enrolled me in what was then known as ATI ( Art Trng Inst Aus) and those lessons that came in the mail were Art Deco style. I had forgotten all about that experience. I then attended Saturday morning classes at Hobart tech until leaving high school when I enrolled as an art student at Hobart Tech Colloge in 1951 when post impressionism was the focus of study. Thanks for reminding me.