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PaulE
28th January 2009, 09:20 AM
Hope some of you might be able to help, I've had the Fl-50 for a while now and been getting on well with it but so far have been making do with some 5yr old rechargeable 1600mAhr Hanhels that came with an old 5mp compact. Surprisingly for the little amount of flash I used so far they've lasted just long enough before needing a re-charge. As I'm starting to use the flash a little more I can see the day coming very soon where I'll be annoyed that I haven't bought a decent set of batteries that will last the whole day / evening so I'm in the market for a set of half decent batteries...

I've only had a quick look so far but it seems things have moved on a long way from them old 1600mAhr batteries and now it seems 2700mAhr is around about the highest capacity available. I'm guessing that the higher the capacity the quicker the flash will cycle and the greater the number of shots I'll get from them? In that case I have been giving some serious consideration to these Uni-ross batteries especially with the 3 for 2 offer from this particular seller: http://www.mymemory.co.uk/Rechargeable-Batteries/Uniross/Uniross-Rechargeable-Batteries---4-x-AA-2700mAh

I've read on this forum about Uni-ross usually being very good for camera battery replacements and wondered if the same applies for their AA's?

One recommendation I've had already from a guy at Maplins are the Uni-ross Hybrio versions I don't understand why they should be any better than other versions other than having a wwf sticker on them and I note they are lower capacity too but are they really any better?

Anyway I'm waffling now... all I'm looking for really is some recommendations for some decent batteries for the FL-50 don't mind spending a little money so long as it's worth it but the proper Olympus battery packs are overkill and a little too pricey for me at the moment.

Hope you have some ideas.....
Thanks
Paul.

Ian
28th January 2009, 09:49 AM
Hope some of you might be able to help, I've had the Fl-50 for a while now and been getting on well with it but so far have been making do with some 5yr old rechargeable 1600mAhr Hanhels that came with an old 5mp compact. Surprisingly for the little amount of flash I used so far they've lasted just long enough before needing a re-charge. As I'm starting to use the flash a little more I can see the day coming very soon where I'll be annoyed that I haven't bought a decent set of batteries that will last the whole day / evening so I'm in the market for a set of half decent batteries...

I've only had a quick look so far but it seems things have moved on a long way from them old 1600mAhr batteries and now it seems 2700mAhr is around about the highest capacity available. I'm guessing that the higher the capacity the quicker the flash will cycle and the greater the number of shots I'll get from them? In that case I have been giving some serious consideration to these Uni-ross batteries especially with the 3 for 2 offer from this particular seller: http://www.mymemory.co.uk/Rechargeable-Batteries/Uniross/Uniross-Rechargeable-Batteries---4-x-AA-2700mAh

I've read on this forum about Uni-ross usually being very good for camera battery replacements and wondered if the same applies for their AA's?

One recommendation I've had already from a guy at Maplins are the Uni-ross Hybrio versions I don't understand why they should be any better than other versions other than having a wwf sticker on them and I note they are lower capacity too but are they really any better?

Anyway I'm waffling now... all I'm looking for really is some recommendations for some decent batteries for the FL-50 don't mind spending a little money so long as it's worth it but the proper Olympus battery packs are overkill and a little too pricey for me at the moment.

Hope you have some ideas.....
Thanks
Paul.

Hi Paul,

Hybrio is another term for a recent development called Low Self Discharge (LSD) NiMH rechargeable batteries. Usually, NiMH batteries lose charge naturally even when they are not in use, at quite a rate - say 10% per month. LSD NiMH batteries can retain around 85% of their charge while being stored for a whole year.

Apart from that, any decent brand of NiMH battery is suitable for your FL-50. Most available are now rated at 2000mAH and greater, with 2600 and 2800, or even 3000mAH also available.

Ian

StephenL
28th January 2009, 10:28 AM
I use Vapex 2600 and 2900mAH with success. For some reason they didn't work in my FL36 - that would only take batteries up to 1800mAH.

andym
28th January 2009, 10:35 AM
I use Vapex 2600 and 2900mAH with success. For some reason they didn't work in my FL36 - that would only take batteries up to 1800mAH.


Thats interesting to know as I was thinking of getting some new batteries for my FL36.

StephenL
28th January 2009, 10:59 AM
I don't know if it's a feature or a fault! There's nothing mentioned in the manual - I only found out by trial and error and throwing things!

Thats interesting to know as I was thinking of getting some new batteries for my FL36.

Dogcow
28th January 2009, 11:27 AM
I am using the new GP Recycko (http://www.gprecyko.com/en/index.html) batteries in my FL-50R.
They have a low discharge rate, so no panic if you haven't used your flash for some time. And I get more shots out of them than with traditional NiMH batteries with the same capacity.

Karel

The Saint
28th January 2009, 12:37 PM
Been using the Hybrio and Enloops (both low discharge batteries) for a couple of years now with my FL-50 and found them to perform very well.

I don't use my flash regularly, so these batteries suite my needs that I can leave them in my bag for a couple of months and still have sufficient charge to take a good quantity images.

Regards

Simon

shenstone
28th January 2009, 01:39 PM
The new Hybrid batteries from Maplin are superb !

i'm chaning over in everything we have that uses batteies and have't hit a single problem yet.

Regards
Andy

StephenL
28th January 2009, 02:05 PM
Can they be used in standard chargers?

Ian
28th January 2009, 03:21 PM
Can they be used in standard chargers?

Yes, they are completely compatible with standard NiMH chargers.

Ian

PaulE
28th January 2009, 07:19 PM
Thank you all for the input, it seems like there is quite a following for the hybrid / low self discharge type batteries for this job, so it appears the helpful guy at Maplins was right. I had anticipated replies like get the highest capacity you can afford but it seems raw capacity comes second to reliablity if left for a period of time. With that in mind I'm guessing that those of you using these LSD batteries (which seem inherently slightly lower in capactiy in comparison with the latest conventional NiMH batteries) have no problems with them draining more quickly than NiMH during use? what I'm asking in a round about way is that providing charging before hand is not an issue would you get a significant number of extra flashes per set of batteries with a conventional as opposed to hybrid battery? (I know it depends on how much power the flash uses each time it's fired etc so it would be very hard to calculate in a real life situation) but what are your impressions? Maybe I'm making this a whole lot more complicated than it needs to be - perhaps I should just go out and buy some Hybrids and take some photos *yes

PaulE
11th February 2009, 10:36 AM
Thankyou for all the input re-batteries I finally got around to visiting Maplins yesterday and picked up a set of their Hybrid batteries and a decent fast charger to go with them. (more acurately the other way around - the batteries came with the charger)

Anyway so far so good I'm very impressed with them and the charger too - the lcd status readout and auto cut off seem like a revelation after struggling with timer switches and very long charging times for years. The FL50 charges so much quicker than with the old NiMH batteries I have been making do with too. After 50 or so flashes so far It's still just as quick to charge so I'm happy :) - I can see myself getting more of these batteries very soon....

Incidently Maplins seemed to have stopped selling the Uniross Hybrio batteries that were on the same stand /shelf as their own brand hybrid batteries - there was one 2pk of D-cell hybrios left all the rest had gone and they've dissapeared from their website too, I can't see them having sold all their stock in just the couple of weeks since I was last there? I wonder if we might, perhaps, see them in the special offer emails shortly... it might possibly a future bargain to look out for...

Paul.

Jonesgj
14th February 2009, 09:20 PM
We always need batteries - AA- in my house, and I wanted some re-chargeables for my FL36R.

I bought Boots brand charger which came with two free batteries (1300 Ni-mh) approx 8 and bought a pack of four 2200 Ni-mh while I was at it. Again these were approx 8. I then found these were part of a 3 for 2 offer, so I picked up another pack for free.

Thought I'd post here, just incase this helps anyone.

Graydon

ianinsuffolk
16th February 2009, 02:22 PM
Surprised at the comment that >1800mAh did not work with the FL36 as I've been using UNiROSS hybrio 2100mAh for some time now with great success. Otherwise totally agree with comments that these batteries are significantly better for all but the most demanding of uses (I run gauge 0 railway engines with R/C so need lots of energy in a small space!).

IaB:p:p

dodger
17th February 2009, 10:14 PM
I used to use Eneloops with an FL-36, but they stopped being available and I'm now using them for other things (keyboards, remotes etc). When I got the FL-50 I started using Ansemann MaxE's, and have had no problems with them.

The Saint
18th February 2009, 07:33 AM
Dodger

You can still get Eneloops from Amazon

Link

Regards

Simon

Naughty Nigel
10th March 2009, 11:11 AM
I have used Jessies own 2000 mA/Hr NiMh batteries for several years, and have had no problems with them. The higher capacity cells may recycle fractionally faster, but having a higher charge density they will probably discharge more quickly, and are more likely to fail.

Price also increases disproportionally as capacity rises, so it is generally best to buy last weeks technology, rather than paying over the odds for next weeks.

Wherever possible, it is usually better to recharge cells at a lower current for longer periods, rather than charging at a very high current over a short period, as overheating and overcharging seriously reduces cell life. Cells can also be more fully charged using low current chargers, whereas high current chargers must cut off short of full charge to avoid cell damage.