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Jonesgj
24th January 2009, 08:37 AM
I didn't find anything on this subject when I searched the forum earlier, so here goes...

This seemed to be a very hot topic on other forums last year, and I have just read that there had been a response to the petition concerning photography in public places (http://www.number10.gov.uk/Page17959) on the 12th January 2009.

I always try and respect others and their property and adopt a common sense approach with respect to my hobby. Some of the stories I have read, however, made me do a little research and, though not conclusive, added a little more caution and awareness to what I like to do. It also prompted me to carry a carry a card similar to this (http://hmmm.co.za/UKPhotographersRightscard_v6.pdf).

I am sure I wouldnt enter into an arguement with an officer of the law, but at least I have an insight into the rights we have. The police do a difficult job, and I wouldnt want to do anything wrong or add to their burden.

Here is another PDF I found interesting can be found can be found here (http://www.sirimo.co.uk/ukpr.php).


Hope you find these useful


Graydon

Ellie
24th January 2009, 09:46 AM
It is useful, thanks.

The government response was mentioned here, but I can't find it either. Doesn't look as if they've changed their position really

Jonesgj
24th January 2009, 10:29 AM
Ellie,

I think it's this:

Read the Governmentís response

Thank you for your e-petition asking for clarification of the law on photography in public places.

There are no legal restrictions on photography in public places. However, the law applies to photographers as it does to anybody else in a public place. So there may be situations in which the taking of photographs may cause or lead to public order situations, inflame an already tense situation, or raise security considerations. Additionally, the police may require a person to move on in order to prevent a breach of the peace, to avoid a public order situation, or for the personís own safety or welfare, or for the safety and welfare of others.

Each situation will be different and it would be an operational matter for the police officer concerned as to what action if any should be taken in respect of those taking photographs. Anybody with a concern about a specific incident should raise the matter with the Chief Constable of the relevant force.

Found here (http://www.number10.gov.uk/Page17959)

Easy to miss as its so low key. If I'm wrong then I can't see it either. :)


Graydon

Graham_of_Rainham
24th January 2009, 11:44 AM
There is a long and detailed discussion of this on the thread:

http://e-group.uk.net/forum/showthread.php?t=1585

*chr

Jonesgj
24th January 2009, 12:05 PM
There is a long and detailed discussion of this on the thread:

http://e-group.uk.net/forum/showthread.php?t=1585

*chr

Thanks Graham. I didn't find it when I searched earlier: wrong keywords perhaps.

Still, that thread finished 31st August 2008 and therefore did not contain reference to the ePetition response. I added my post just in case anyone was interested, and not to open another can of worms!

Kind regards

Graydon

Graham_of_Rainham
24th January 2009, 10:41 PM
Graydon,

It's good that brought this up at this time as only today I saw on the news an item about train spotters that kept getting stopped and searched under Section 44 and how the numbers were rising...

My favoured technique in London is now to seek out a police officer and ask them if there is anything in the areas I want to work in that may be of concern to them. They have always said no (todate) so I make a note of their number and if approached I simply tell them that PC XYZ is aware of my presence. This works very well with over zealous "Security Staff" that have often insisted that I can't photograph thier building.

Anyway it's still quite rare to be approched, so don't let it put you off.

*chr

yorky
25th January 2009, 02:42 PM
Thanks Graham, i just signed the petition to Brown. the only thing is, how many security guards would take any notice of it even supposing they bothered to read it

Graham_of_Rainham
25th January 2009, 04:11 PM
Thanks Graham, i just signed the petition to Brown. the only thing is, how many security guards would take any notice of it even supposing they bothered to read it


Based on my experiences to date, while the "Security" staff may read it and there are some that will even understand it, they will always do the bidding of their masters. I've had first hand experience of this and had to explain to a manager that he was incorrectly instructing his staff. I also pointed out that should I so wish I could sit on the balcony of the building across the street and photograph the names on the ID cards of all the staff standing at the side of the building by the open fire exit having a smoke :p

I have the advantage of having worked in high security areas and have managed security staff. I too have told my 6 foot (in all dimensions) security guard to "Tell them they have to go away" (or whatever) and all the time the people are unaware of their rights, and assume that the person representing "Authority" does, then they comply. :o

Most of the time I now opt for the quiet life and simply ignore those that are wrong and go off and find something more interesting to photograph. ;)

*chr

Ellie
26th January 2009, 01:43 AM
Thanks Graham. I didn't find it when I searched earlier: wrong keywords perhaps.

Still, that thread finished 31st August 2008 and therefore did not contain reference to the ePetition response. I added my post just in case anyone was interested, and not to open another can of worms!

Kind regards

Graydon
Here's the more recent one. ;) http://e-group.uk.net/forum/showthread.php?t=4288

It didn't perhaps get the comments it warranted.

Graham mentions asking Police about taking photographs. I did ask once, but it's something I wouldn't do again, because it gives them the opportunity to say no - which they did. I frankly don't want to give some people more power than they already think they have. I know I can take a photograph if I'm standing on a public pavement, that should be enough, but I have printed out that information sheet, just in case.

photo_owl
26th January 2009, 10:47 AM
you must be asking the wrong question Ellie - I use the same approach as Graham and 'no' is the answer I want to hear.

wording the question correctly positions the authority

from my experiences, most confusion in practice seems to revolve around areas where the public have open access to private property - it's still private property. An increasing extension of this is local authority areas (unfortunately).

Graham_of_Rainham
27th January 2009, 12:08 AM
...from my experiences, most confusion in practice seems to revolve around areas where the public have open access to private property - it's still private property. An increasing extension of this is local authority areas (unfortunately).

Indeed. There are areas that were once roads, but are now pedestrian "precincts" and some of these have been taken over by property management companies and as such are no longer public places. It is here where the "Security" staff seem to be at their worse for stopping photographers. To be fair they are stopping everything else as well, that they have been told not to allow. So Photographers are now grouped the same as street performers, skate boarders, beggers, drunks, and anyone else that they take a dislike to...:(

I do however have an answer to this. My 1st generation mobile phone is big enough to house my compact camera and they take no notice of people using mobiles. Of course getting caught with it would probably get me 25years in bellmarsh for going equipped...:eek:

*chr