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Zuiko
6th December 2016, 11:18 PM
Well, my hip replacement is due tomorrow and, unlike the previous three occasions, it has yet to be cancelled. There is, of course, still plenty of time for something to go wrong but at this late stage it does look mildly promising. Let's hope you do not hear from me for a few days - in this case no news is good news.

Bye for now (I hope) *chr

Ross the fiddler
6th December 2016, 11:20 PM
Here's hoping all goes well this time! *yes *chr

Beagletorque
7th December 2016, 12:03 AM
Best of luck John, hope it does go ahead this time. *yes

Imageryone
7th December 2016, 07:12 AM
It will be really good for you and the family if the long wait is finally over, if so, wishing you the very best for today, look forward to news :)

Ian
7th December 2016, 07:36 AM
Fingers and everything else crossed, John!

Ian

Simon Bee
7th December 2016, 08:03 AM
Yes best of luck from me too John.

Kind regards, Simon

Phill D
7th December 2016, 08:51 AM
All the best John.

pandora
7th December 2016, 08:55 AM
I wish you a very successful hip replacement and a subsequent gain in mobility, John.

Cheers, mate. *chr

pdk42
7th December 2016, 09:05 AM
Good luck John.

Bikie John
7th December 2016, 09:42 AM
Fingers crossed, and sending positive thoughts over the ether.

John

Grumpy Hec
7th December 2016, 11:12 AM
Thinking of you John and looking forward to your new found mobility *chr

Hec

Miketoll
7th December 2016, 12:02 PM
Best of luck, hope you are soon running around enjoying a new lease of painfree life.

OM USer
7th December 2016, 12:11 PM
All the best and a nice christmas pressie.

Petrochemist
7th December 2016, 12:26 PM
Hope it goes well John.

rsh1960
7th December 2016, 01:11 PM
Best Of Luck John, here's to a speedy recovery.

IainMacD
7th December 2016, 01:13 PM
Best wishes John, you'll be up and running in no time.

Otto
7th December 2016, 02:03 PM
Good luck John - it made all the difference to a friend of mine :)

Graham_of_Rainham
7th December 2016, 03:29 PM
Very best wishes, please let us know how it goes.

*chr

sapper
7th December 2016, 04:19 PM
Hope it all goes well for you tomorrow John.

Wee man
7th December 2016, 09:32 PM
Just found this hope all well, I have a set of crutches if you want them.
Good luck

Wee Man

tomphotofx
7th December 2016, 09:53 PM
All the best John.

Tom

wanderer
7th December 2016, 10:09 PM
Best of luck.
What are you going to replace it with?:D Some sort of tripod or monopod?:D

bilbo
7th December 2016, 10:25 PM
Best wishes to you for a speedy recovery John!

Ian
7th December 2016, 10:29 PM
Just to let everyone know that I have heard indirectly that John is recovering well from his op earlier today! :)

Ian

PeterBirder
7th December 2016, 10:36 PM
Just to let everyone know that I have heard indirectly that John is recovering well from his op earlier today! :)

Ian

Good news, thanks for letting us know Ian.

Regards.*chr

maccabeej
8th December 2016, 08:50 AM
Also just found this. Hope it happened and went well.

Barr1e
8th December 2016, 09:05 AM
Just to let everyone know that I have heard indirectly that John is recovering well from his op earlier today! :)

Ian

Thanks Ian.

-------------------

Hi John -

Anne (Ann1e) and I wish you a speedy recovery.


Regards. Barr1e

snaarman
8th December 2016, 09:09 AM
Good news man. Hope it all went well

:-)

Pete

RogerMac
8th December 2016, 09:52 AM
Best of luck John. I am sure that all will go well - everybody I know who has had one (and my wife has had two) made quick recoveries and had ther life transformed I hope this is true of you as well

Roger

Phill D
8th December 2016, 10:02 AM
Thanks for the update Ian. Looking forward to John's first post op post.

joglos
8th December 2016, 10:07 AM
Best of Luck John, Speedy recovery

crimbo
8th December 2016, 11:36 AM
Hopefully it is happening So you will not reply at the moment good luck

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk

Ross the fiddler
8th December 2016, 12:03 PM
Just to let everyone know that I have heard indirectly that John is recovering well from his op earlier today! :)

Ian

Great news Ian. Thanks for letting us know that much. *yes

*chr

Naughty Nigel
8th December 2016, 01:31 PM
Just to let everyone know that I have heard indirectly that John is recovering well from his op earlier today! :)

Ian

Excellent news. I gather you don't get to spend long in bed these days either! *yes

tomphotofx
8th December 2016, 01:58 PM
Thanks Ian for the update, Wishing you a good recovery John.

All the best,

Tom

IainMacD
8th December 2016, 02:00 PM
Just to let everyone know that I have heard indirectly that John is recovering well from his op earlier today! :)

Ian

Great news!
*chr

MargaretR
8th December 2016, 02:09 PM
Glad it happened this time, John. All the best for a speedy recovery! :tup

maccabeej
8th December 2016, 02:20 PM
Brilliant news.

Greytop
8th December 2016, 07:43 PM
Best wishes John for a comfortable recovery.

DerekW
8th December 2016, 08:26 PM
Where are the pictures - if no pictures then it did not happen!!

Wreckdiver
8th December 2016, 09:50 PM
Best of luck John. I had my right hip-joint replaced 5 years ago this Christmas and was out in 2 days. Not half the ordeal I expected :)

Steve

Graptolite
8th December 2016, 10:35 PM
That's great news John. You do realise that you'll never pass through airport security again without setting off the alarm? Be prepared to get frisked!

Zuiko
11th December 2016, 04:34 PM
Well, I'm home! Thanks for all your good wishes, they really are appreciated.

The op went really well and already the new hip is less painful than the old one. I would have been home 2 days ago, but they wouldn't discharge me until I had a bowel movement and mine wouldn't cooperate! As it happened I had a comfortable stay in hospital and even the food was good.

The NHS often gets a bad press, but I cannot fault my treatment. All the staff I met, from the tea lady to the surgeon who performed my op, were hard-working, dedicated, compassionate people whom I could not fault. It's time we stopped running our NHS down and started to sing its praises instead. We should be proud to have THE VERY BEST FREE TO ALL HEALTH SERVICE ON THE PLANET.

Sure, the service is buckling under the weight of unrealistic targets and cracking at the seams through under-funding and lack of political support, but that is not the fault of the dedicated front line staff who every day do their very best, working long shifts in difficult circumstances, but always with a smile or a kind word for the patient.

I am very grateful for my new hip, which did not cost me a penny, apart from what I already pay in tax. It's a sobering thought that if I lived in, say, the USA I probably wouldn't have been able to afford the necessary insurance to cover my treatment and , for me, this operation would not have been possible.

So my message to our politicians who would like to see the break-up and privatiisation of our health provision is are you mad? The NHS is probably our nation's single greatest achievement and you should put all your energy into supporting and improving it.

It's good to be back. :)

andym
11th December 2016, 04:38 PM
Great news. Hope your soon out and about.:):):)

Ian
11th December 2016, 04:41 PM
Great to hear you're home John! My mother in law is quite frail and is currently in hospital with Julia by her side so we're also in appreciation, directly, of what the NHS offers.

Ian

bilbo
11th December 2016, 04:50 PM
Good to hear from you John.

Best wishes again for a speedy recovery.

George Dorn
11th December 2016, 04:51 PM
Good to hear John.

My recent experiences of the NHS have all been impressively positive, despite pre-emptive doom mongering by the blue tops.

Phill D
11th December 2016, 04:58 PM
Glad you are back John and all went well. Hear hear on your NHS comments from me too.
Have a nice restfull Christmas.

Zuiko
11th December 2016, 04:58 PM
Great to hear you're home John! My mother in law is quite frail and is currently in hospital with Julia by her side so we're also in appreciation, directly, of what the NHS offers.

Ian

Sorry to hear that, Ian, I hope all goes well for her. At least she is in good hands.

PeterBirder
11th December 2016, 05:11 PM
Great to hear you are home and already feeling the benifit of the new hip John.
Wonderful to hear you had such a positive experience with the great staff at Broomfield.

Good luck with "running in" the new component.:)

Best wishes.*chr

Otto
11th December 2016, 05:12 PM
I have always had great service from the NHS too, and am fortunate to have a walk-in GP surgery within 50 yards of my house. I won't have a word said against it, it's very sad that it's still being treated as a political football.

Excellent news John, glad you're back safe and sound, and I'm sure you'll be properly up and about very soon!

Imageryone
11th December 2016, 05:19 PM
That is really heartening news, John, nearly popped round this afternoon, but wasn't sure if you were home yet.
After my 100,000 pump heart service last year, I can only echo your experience of the Health service, I would not be here today without their care and expertise.

IainMacD
11th December 2016, 05:19 PM
Glad you are on the mend John. I too am a big fan of our wonderful NHS.

pdk42
11th December 2016, 05:31 PM
Well, I'm home! Thanks for all your good wishes, they really are appreciated.

The op went really well and already the new hip is less painful than the old one. I would have been home 2 days ago, but they wouldn't discharge me until I had a bowel movement and mine wouldn't cooperate! As it happened I had a comfortable stay in hospital and even the food was good.

The NHS often gets a bad press, but I cannot fault my treatment. All the staff I met, from the tea lady to the surgeon who performed my op, were hard-working, dedicated, compassionate people whom I could not fault. It's time we stopped running our NHS down and started to sing its praises instead. We should be proud to have THE VERY BEST FREE TO ALL HEALTH SERVICE ON THE PLANET.

Sure, the service is buckling under the weight of unrealistic targets and cracking at the seams through under-funding and lack of political support, but that is not the fault of the dedicated front line staff who every day do their very best, working long shifts in difficult circumstances, but always with a smile or a kind word for the patient.

I am very grateful for my new hip, which did not cost me a penny, apart from what I already pay in tax. It's a sobering thought that if I lived in, say, the USA I probably wouldn't have been able to afford the necessary insurance to cover my treatment and , for me, this operation would not have been possible.

So my message to our politicians who would like to see the break-up and privatiisation of our health provision is are you mad? The NHS is probably our nation's single greatest achievement and you should put all your energy into supporting and improving it.

It's good to be back. :)

Great to hear it all went well John and hoping to see a return to your photo mojo too.

I also totally endorse your view of the NHS. The company I work for has an office in the US and one of the people who joined us recently was telling a tale of woe about medical insurance. He was very nearly bankrupted by medical bills incurred by his wife during childbirth complications. It transpired that their health insurance didn't cover them adequately and they ended up having to sell their house to pay the bills - something nearing $100k. Gulp.

The NHS is certainly one of this country's outstanding achievements and nobody should forget it.

Simon Bee
11th December 2016, 05:55 PM
Great news John. The thing with the NHS is often the time it takes to get an operation, once in though the care is second to none, arguably the best in the world. We are all very lucky to have access to a 'free at point of use' healthcare service, yes its creaking at the seams but its a wonderful service never the less and we would all moan a hell of a lot more if we didn't have access to it. Long live the NHS for it is without doubt our greatest treasure .

Kind regards, Simon

Bikie John
11th December 2016, 06:44 PM
That's great news John, thanks for letting us know. Here's hoping you can get mobile and pain-free again.

Other John

Jim Ford
11th December 2016, 07:22 PM
Great news about the hip, John. (Make sure you do the exercises!).

I'm afraid that I don't have any optimism about the future of our NHS. It's being set-up by the politicians to fail in the future. Also, don't forget that Hunt (the Health Secretary) was a co-author of a paper that stated that the NHS should be privatised!

Jim

Zuiko
11th December 2016, 07:29 PM
Great to hear it all went well John and hoping to see a return to your photo mojo too.

I also totally endorse your view of the NHS. The company I work for has an office in the US and one of the people who joined us recently was telling a tale of woe about medical insurance. He was very nearly bankrupted by medical bills incurred by his wife during childbirth complications. It transpired that their health insurance didn't cover them adequately and they ended up having to sell their house to pay the bills - something nearing $100k. Gulp.

The NHS is certainly one of this country's outstanding achievements and nobody should forget it.

That's an horrific story, Paul, illustrating that under such a system even if you do all the right things you are still at the mercy of insurance company small print, treatment limits and get-out clauses.

Zuiko
11th December 2016, 07:35 PM
Great news about the hip, John. (Make sure you do the exercises!).

I'm afraid that I don't have any optimism about the future of our NHS. It's being set-up by the politicians to fail in the future. Also, don't forget that Hunt (the Health Secretary) was a co-author of a paper that stated that the NHS should be privatised!

Jim

I share your fears, Jim, which is why I want to point out how great the NHS really is. My views on Jeremy Hunt probably shouldn't be printed.

Ian
11th December 2016, 07:47 PM
I'll say it again, the doomsayers have been predicting the demise of the NHS for over 20 years and it's still here. So I think the naysayers are wrong. It will be political suicide to privatise the NHS. However, I'm not against people voicing such fears as it will do no harm in maintaining status of the NHS as a must-have institution. On the other hand, we spend less on the NHS than most other comparable countries so we must expect to be taxed more to pay for it.

Ian

Zuiko
11th December 2016, 07:49 PM
I share your fears, Jim, which is why I want to point out how great the NHS really is. My views on Jeremy Hunt probably shouldn't be printed.

I am mildly optimistic that a change in the Government's austerity policies may benefit funding for the NHS now that Phillip Hammond has ripped up the Tory blueprint for the last decade on reducing the Budget deficit and the National Debt. :rolleyes:

Wreckdiver
11th December 2016, 07:56 PM
Welcome back John. I had my op done at Salisbury hospital and all the staff were amazing and efficient. Fantastic service, our NHS is a precious jewel that needs to be looked after. The politicians will never understand as I reckon none of them will ever need the NHS as they would all have private insurance :(:(:(

Steve

Ian
11th December 2016, 08:27 PM
Welcome back John. I had my op done at Salisbury hospital and all the staff were amazing and efficient. Fantastic service, our NHS is a precious jewel that needs to be looked after. The politicians will never understand as I reckon none of them will ever need the NHS as they would all have private insurance :(:(:(

Steve

Like David Cameron and his disabled child?

Ian

shenstone
11th December 2016, 09:06 PM
Good news john - hope all is well from here on

I'm also a fan of the NHS and I have US colleagues who are terrified of losing their jobs in a no fault dismissal state. it makes people frightened to speak up for want is right at work and I often end up doing it for them from the safety of the UK

Mind you I've just paid to have a private MRI as there was a 6 month waiting list for the NHS to see a consultant

The trouble often is those who turn to it for every minor ailment to even get a prescription for paracetamol to save a few pennies (I am sure we all know such people). It means the NHS will always outgrow its budget and I am personally in favour of a minor charge at point of use for those who can just to stop that sort of behaviour

My GP was actually quite surprised when I turned down a prescription stating I could cope with the pain I am in using over the counter drugs and I just want to find the root cause not be given things I can afford cheaply.

I know that won't work for everyone.

Regards
Andy

Beagletorque
11th December 2016, 11:04 PM
Splendid news John, glad your straight back into the e-group saddle too!

Melaka
12th December 2016, 07:54 AM
Welcome back!

Zuiko
12th December 2016, 10:10 AM
glad your straight back into the e-group saddle too!

Nothing much else I can do! :p

Ross the fiddler
12th December 2016, 10:18 AM
Good to see you back here & recovering & that all was a success. *yes

*chr

Zuiko
12th December 2016, 10:34 AM
Good news john - hope all is well from here on

I'm also a fan of the NHS and I have US colleagues who are terrified of losing their jobs in a no fault dismissal state. it makes people frightened to speak up for want is right at work and I often end up doing it for them from the safety of the UK

Mind you I've just paid to have a private MRI as there was a 6 month waiting list for the NHS to see a consultant

The trouble often is those who turn to it for every minor ailment to even get a prescription for paracetamol to save a few pennies (I am sure we all know such people). It means the NHS will always outgrow its budget and I am personally in favour of a minor charge at point of use for those who can just to stop that sort of behaviour

My GP was actually quite surprised when I turned down a prescription stating I could cope with the pain I am in using over the counter drugs and I just want to find the root cause not be given things I can afford cheaply.

I know that won't work for everyone.

Regards
Andy

Very true, I left hospital with a bag full of medicines. Some, I guess, are quite specialist, such as the daily injections to prevent blood clots and the Morphine. But Paracetamol and Ibruprofen issued on prescription? Really? What do they think I've been living off for the last 13 months - I have a stockpile at home! Also I wasn't asked to pay for the prescriptions so I presume the cost comes from the hospital budget. I have a pre-payment card I could have used and presumably that would have come from the central budget.

Have I mentioned that the food was nice? All free, too and I saved on the food I would have eaten had I been at home. I'm not rich, so I wouldn't have wanted to pay restaurant prices, but I would happily make a modest contribution and if everyone did that...........

DerekW
12th December 2016, 11:06 AM
You are now pushing into the hallowed ground of
"Free at the point of delivery"
Which will get certain groups of fanatic NyeBevanCare supporters very upset.

However I agree with all your comments

A question to all
How much extra are you prepared to pay for access to the NHS - £5 per week, £10 per week, however one would expect the the increase in payments to generate a verifiable improvement in service levels.

Zuiko
12th December 2016, 11:09 AM
Down to earth with a bit of a bump this morning. Recovery starts apace in hospital because all the equipment you might need is there, in a purpose built environment, with someone with specialist training on hand to assist when required.

At home this morning it seems that nothing I need is where I want it, it's not easy to get to it and there's nobody to help! :rolleyes:

Jim Ford
12th December 2016, 11:09 AM
Stop sitting in front of the computer John, and get out exercising your new hip!

;^)

Did you get special compression socks to prevent blood clots? My partner had them and they were awful to get on and off. They were also very uncomfortable because they had a big hole on the toe area.

My partner had pills to prevent blood clots when she had her first hip done, but had injections (in the abdomen) for her second.

She also had a simple device that greatly helped in putting on ordinary socks. I think she had to buy it (it wasn't expensive.)

Jim

OM USer
12th December 2016, 11:11 AM
Welcome back John.

DerekW
12th December 2016, 12:01 PM
To help putting flight socks on (compression socks) take a polythene bag and turn it into a sleeve by opening the bottom, place over foot and lower leg then roll up the compression sock and place toe into end of sock and then pull sock over the poly bag and foot and leg. Finally pull the bag out of the top of the sock and remove the bag back over the leg.

I was instructed on using the polybag by the spinal nurse for my op - - however I find that rolling up the sock and then place foot into rolled up sock is the best way. Can also be done on the plane if you have an aisle seat in cattle - a lot easier in Club or First

Naughty Nigel
12th December 2016, 07:31 PM
You are now pushing into the hallowed ground of
"Free at the point of delivery"
Which will get certain groups of fanatic NyeBevanCare supporters very upset.

However I agree with all your comments

A question to all
How much extra are you prepared to pay for access to the NHS - £5 per week, £10 per week, however one would expect the the increase in payments to generate a verifiable improvement in service levels.

I would happily pay £5 per week for access to the NHS, although I think we already do that through income tax and National Insurance.

Actually, I am perfectly happy that those who are unfortunate enough to have medical problems through no fault of their own should receive their care free of charge.

However, I would charge for cosmetic surgery (unless there was a medical need), and for all self-inflicted conditions.

I do not buy the argument that 'we pay our taxes therefore we are entitled to poison ourselves and receive free treatment from the NHS'.

Likewise those involved in fighting; many of whom I suspect are regular customers. :rolleyes:

Grumpy Hec
12th December 2016, 08:04 PM
Great to see you home and on the road to recovery. Keep that exercise up. People I know who've had hip and knee replacements all say it's the key to a speedy and sustainable recovery.

I very much agree with your sentiments on the NHS. A true national treasure.

Hec

DerekW
12th December 2016, 08:35 PM
NN

Unfortunately the amount collected by income tax and NI is not sufficient to cover the costs of an ageing population, so I think paying a top up payment would be OK and not go against the NyeBevanCare ethos. After all lots of people pay for dentists and for opticians and glasses.

Naughty Nigel
12th December 2016, 10:29 PM
NN

Unfortunately the amount collected by income tax and NI is not sufficient to cover the costs of an ageing population, so I think paying a top up payment would be OK and not go against the NyeBevanCare ethos. After all lots of people pay for dentists and for opticians and glasses.

I consider myself very fortunate that I have had little need for the NHS during my life so far, so I should be 'in benefit' so to speak.

I would be happy to make a contribution to care for myself and those who are less fortunate, but once again, I am reluctant to pay yet more for those whose lifestyle choices mean they are regular customers of the NHS.

Maybe apply an NHS tax to McDonald's, sugar, confectionary and cigarette manufacturers, the breweries and so forth?

Phill D
13th December 2016, 07:17 AM
Nicely put Nigel I'm with you on this one.

DerekW
13th December 2016, 09:43 AM
NN you are sounding like some Republicans I have met in the US who hate the concept of Obamacare as it helps the less careful/successful people and especially women who want abortions.

Naughty Nigel
13th December 2016, 06:01 PM
NN you are sounding like some Republicans I have met in the US who hate the concept of Obamacare as it helps the less careful/successful people and especially women who want abortions.

Not at all. I have never suggested that those who are less well off should be denied healthcare; quite the contrary in fact. The fact is that the NHS has finite resources, and far too much is spent on those who create their own misfortunes.

How often does one see people standing at hospital doors with drips attached, smoking for England? And how much is spent on those who cannot pass a McDonald's or chip shop without filling their faces?

Like it or not, at some point we have to take some responsibility for our own actions. Indeed, I would argue that that is exactly where we have gone wrong over the past fifty years.

iso
15th December 2016, 06:54 PM
How far do you take the 'life choice' argument? You want to drive a car / you want to ski/play rugby/get pregnant etc - accidental consequences of all these and many more 'life choices' occur. It just happens that at this point in social history, these choices are regarded as ok. The previous ones mentioned are not. Not exactly sound argument for a sociological/economic concept for the NHS.

Zuiko
15th December 2016, 07:13 PM
How far do you take the 'life choice' argument? You want to drive a car / you want to ski/play rugby/get pregnant etc - accidental consequences of all these and many more 'life choices' occur. It just happens that at this point in social history, these choices are regarded as ok. The previous ones mentioned are not. Not exactly sound argument for a sociological/economic concept for the NHS.

Whenever there is a hillwalking or climbing accident I'm always annoyed by the number of judgemental people who scream for the victims to be charged for their rescue. And yet the carnage caused and costs incurred by driving at 70mph in thick fog on a motorway seems to be socially acceptable.

iso
15th December 2016, 07:47 PM
Just so. The 'Life Choice' aspect was never on the radar when Bevan during WW2 was put in charge of developing the concept of an NHS 'free at the point...'to be in place when Peace arrived. It was a far simpler, direct, and targeted idea. Get rid of paying to see a GP - that way people would seek medical help before things got too bad. Coordinate emergency response, so there were 'expert centres' to deal with individual A&E or, because of the war experience, large numbers of people. Given the terrible fiscal state of the country the concept had to be paid for. So National Insurance.

And of course if you pay for something - NI - then what happened? - People believed they had a right to use it --- as now a days - not for the original objective.

Naughty Nigel
15th December 2016, 10:21 PM
Just so. The 'Life Choice' aspect was never on the radar when Bevan during WW2 was put in charge of developing the concept of an NHS 'free at the point...'to be in place when Peace arrived. It was a far simpler, direct, and targeted idea. Get rid of paying to see a GP - that way people would seek medical help before things got too bad. Coordinate emergency response, so there were 'expert centres' to deal with individual A&E or, because of the war experience, large numbers of people. Given the terrible fiscal state of the country the concept had to be paid for. So National Insurance.

And of course if you pay for something - NI - then what happened? - People believed they had a right to use it --- as now a days - not for the original objective.

I believe the original concept of the NHS was to get taxpayers back to productive work and paying tax as quickly as possible. For all the laudable aims I don't think the early NHS was quite as cuddly as we like to think. There was a hard-headed business case for the NHS, and given the dire state of the economy at the time, and the low cost of NHS wages it would have made a lot of sense. And the NHS probably didn't employ anywhere near as many highly paid managers and administrators as it does now.

I take the point about hill walking and motoring accidents, but nobody sets out to get a free helicopter ride to A&E. On balance, the health benefits of hill walking probably far outweigh the risks, whilst many of those involved in motoring accidents will have been involved in productive, tax paying work at the time. (Not to mention the taxes paid by motorists!)

This is very different to smokers, heavy drinkers, druggies and the morbidly obese, who cannot fail to be aware of the very significant health risks they are taking. Fifty years ago perhaps these people could be forgiven for not knowing the score, but not in 2016.

And don't forget that treatment options in the 1940's and 1950's were much more limited than today. There certainly wouldn't have been the horrendously expensive drug treatments that we have today, and little in the way of cosmetic surgery.

In an ideal world the NHS would have the money and resources to treat all-comers, but given finite funds where does one draw the line?

All I am suggesting is that those with self-inflicted conditions who have caused their own ill health should contribute towards the cost of their care, and/or should take their place in the queue behind those whose conditions are innocently incurred.

Magus
15th December 2016, 11:04 PM
And don't forget that treatment options in the 1940's and 1950's were much more limited than today. There certainly wouldn't have been the horrendously expensive drug treatments that we have today, and little in the way of cosmetic surgery.

I remember being told by our family doctor about 65 years ago that the tablets he was giving me were £1 each (aureomycin). That is equivalent to about £25 and I was taking 3 a day. Drug treatments were never all that cheap - you can rely on Big Pharma for that.

Naughty Nigel
15th December 2016, 11:21 PM
I remember being told by our family doctor about 65 years ago that the tablets he was giving me were £1 each (aureomycin). That is equivalent to about £25 and I was taking 3 a day. Drug treatments were never all that cheap - you can rely on Big Pharma for that.

That is true enough, but some of the new treatments today cost £thousands.

On the other hand there are people who will take up their GP's time to get a free prescription for a 50 pence packet of Paracetamol.

Zuiko
16th December 2016, 09:24 AM
I was a bit more concerned about the spiralling cost of healthcare until Philip Hammond revealed that there is a bottomless pit of money available to fund Brexit and that neither the Debt or the Deficit matter much anymore! :D

Homer Simpson
16th December 2016, 09:40 AM
Belated good wishes, John

Naughty Nigel
16th December 2016, 09:42 AM
I was a bit more concerned about the spiralling cost of healthcare until Philip Hammond revealed that there is a bottomless pit of money available to fund Brexit and that neither the Debt or the Deficit matter much anymore! :D

..... or whatever the current 'flavour of the month' is. :rolleyes:

Otto
16th December 2016, 10:24 AM
This is very different to smokers, heavy drinkers, druggies and the morbidly obese, who cannot fail to be aware of the very significant health risks they are taking.
(snip)
All I am suggesting is that those with self-inflicted conditions who have caused their own ill health should contribute towards the cost of their care, and/or should take their place in the queue behind those whose conditions are innocently incurred.

Bear in mind that many people who end up abusing substances have underlying mental health issues, and perhaps if mental health services were better funded and there was better education about mental health, there would be fewer people requiring treatment for what you describe as "self-inflicted" conditions. They are not necessarily "self-inflicted" by any means.

Naughty Nigel
16th December 2016, 10:26 AM
Bear in mind that many people who end up abusing substances have underlying mental health issues, and perhaps if mental health services were better funded and there was better education about mental health, there would be fewer people requiring treatment for what you describe as "self-inflicted" conditions. They are not necessarily "self-inflicted" by any means.

Are you saying that chain smoking is a mental health issue?

shenstone
16th December 2016, 10:44 AM
On the other hand there are people who will take up their GP's time to get a free prescription for a 50 pence packet of Paracetamol.

These are the only people I commented about.

Almost any condition can be debated re self inflicted or not, but pure timewasting is clear IMO


Anyway.. never mind this.. John How's the Hip going ?

regards
Andy

Otto
16th December 2016, 10:52 AM
The underlying reason might well be a mental health issue. Why would anyone take up smoking these days when the dangers are so well known? Just dismissing such behaviour out of hand is unreasonable and shows a lack of understanding. I'm not saying it's always the case but it should always be considered.

Naughty Nigel
16th December 2016, 03:06 PM
Why would anyone take up smoking these days when the dangers are so well known?

In most cases taking up smoking is an 'image' thing; especially amongst teenagers. Tobacco itself is known to be particularly addictive, but tobacco companies also add chocolate amongst other additives to make smoking more attractive to children.

The NHS offers many types of help for those who want to give up smoking.

Given the above should the NHS spend any more of its precious resources on those who choose to continue smoking despite the well publicised health risks?

There must come a point at which we take personal responsibility for our own actions rather than expecting government to pick up the bill every time.

Otto
16th December 2016, 03:55 PM
But where do you draw the line? There are plenty of things in life which carry a high level of risk, why pick on smoking? Should we deny treatment for sports injuries because if you play sport you risk injuring yourself? We should do all we can to discourage people from starting the habit, but denying someone treatment purely on the grounds of a known risk is the thin edge of a very dangerous wedge. My father smoked quite heavily most of his life and lived to be 93 without any ill effects; the stink of his cigs put me off smoking for life but I wouldn't object to my taxes paying for treatment for someone else's smoking related health issue.

Anyway, we digress!

DavyG
16th December 2016, 04:48 PM
Sorry, I hadn't spotted this thread.

Glad to hear you finally had the op and that all is going well John.

Dave

iso
16th December 2016, 07:05 PM
Enough of this highjack of a hip thread - but John if you remember there was a suggestion of a common discussion Sticky - Didn't hear anything back...

Wee man
16th December 2016, 07:11 PM
John only found this, glad all went well keep up the exercises and do not let the muscles get out of condition.

Regarding the NHS a person walking in a town and having a fall is in an ambulance and on way to help in 15 minutes or so with pain control drugs.
The unfortunate hill walker has to lie there for maybe an hour or more before being painfully carried down to a road head for transfer to an ambulance.
At that point both are equal.
The search and evacuation is carried out by unpaid volunteers who probably also raised funds for the equipment and train in their own time. To put a charge would totally change the service and the regulations imposed would change the type of people coming forward. The service works by hill people wanting to help other unfortunate hill people as they would like to think this would happen for them. Making it a paid service would change the nature of teams and make things a lot more expensive.
Helicopters get the press but most rescue call outs go unnoticed, and are a heavy slog with a lot of physical work. With a carry of at times a number of hours and long distances over awkward terrain in poor weather and darkness. Unlike an air ambulance mountain rescue helicopters are working in a high risk environment for the crew and aircraft so are not used in every rescue. They tend to be reserved for a seriously injured casualty or life threatening incidents. Rescue becomes like photography a way of life or dare I say almost a hobby ( but a very serious one ) which does take over your life.
I speak as one who knows as I am retiring/ dropping out of mountain rescue in 2017 after forty years service.
The lifeboat and Coastguard may be a paid service with well set up support services to raise funds but the staff also have the ethics of volunteers.
So people who have incidents in mountain areas cost much the same as lowland or rural area accidents as the casualty is transported to a road head or even the hospital by teams who are not taking funds from the NHS in fact they are making a saving by their actions.

Just my take on this area, I will admit sometimes the people needing help in the mountains are plonkers but not to the degree a drunken person is when they have an incident rather than an accident.

A standing joke when charging for the service is brought up is to mention the ABC of first aid it becomes Access. : Barclay card or Cash Sir?
Think about it


Back to sleep now.

Did not think the phone batteries would last this epistle.

Wee Man

DerekW
16th December 2016, 09:02 PM
In ER (A&E to us) in the US we have had to proffer the credit card to the receptionist before being looked at.

Naughty Nigel
16th December 2016, 10:37 PM
The lifeboat and Coastguard may be a paid service with well set up support services to raise funds but the staff also have the ethics of volunteers.

As far as I know only one lifeboat crew in the UK is paid; all others are volunteers. However, RNLI lifeguards are paid by local authorities.

Wee man
17th December 2016, 09:03 AM
I was referring more to their equipment etc, both services save the NHS funds was my main point.

Wee Man