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pandora
3rd December 2016, 08:40 PM
Odd Magpie Behavior - this Maggie seems to live a solitary existence, it appears not to belong to a flock.
It spends most of its time foraging on my lawn and seems to trust me whenever I walk by.
Occasionally I toss bits of bread on the lawn but yesterday when I left my door open
it paid me a me a visit - this was a grab shot with the phonecam.

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/20161203_094716.jpg (http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/91322)

Jim Ford
3rd December 2016, 09:18 PM
Nice visitor, but nothing like any magpies we get in the UK.

Jim

Beagletorque
3rd December 2016, 11:19 PM
You'll have to try him with a paint brush!

Imageryone
4th December 2016, 09:46 AM
Perhaps he likes monochrome paintings ? :D

pandora
4th December 2016, 10:36 AM
Jim, Andrew, Img - Yep, he's actually scheduled for portraiture next year.
Shot today on my lawn with the XZ1. Next time I'll roll out the big gun, E3 +50-200mm
http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/XZ1.jpg (http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/91324)

In Flight, different genus of gender perhaps? (I'm no twitcher) E3 + SWD 50-200mm (Nov. 2013)
http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/Feathers20.jpg (http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/91338)
.

iso
4th December 2016, 06:14 PM
Call that scraggy thing a Magpie!! Ours have a more pleasant shape and a sheen to their several shades - still a pest though :eek: Does Aussie have the same superstitions about them e.g. Single for woe etc ?

pandora
4th December 2016, 07:03 PM
Admittedly this guy is on the scraggy side, although all are not so. Perhaps like Jonathon Livingston Seagull he chose isolation over conformity, excellence over mediocrity, sagacity over superstition - your typical Aussie as one might say. :D

Ian
4th December 2016, 07:40 PM
Introduced European blackbirds are apparently well-established in south eastern Australia but Australian magpies are unrelated to the European species and are not even part of the same Corvid (crow-like) family.

Ian

Naughty Nigel
5th December 2016, 10:55 AM
http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/XZ1.jpg (http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/91324)



Magpies are a familiar sight around our roads, feasting on the remains of unfortunate creatures that have met their end.

Apparently the superstition about single magpies is that they usually live and hunt as pairs, so if one bird is seen alone the other has probably been killed or injured.

But why do they always remind me of lawyers, feasting on others' misfortunes? :rolleyes:

Harold Gough
5th December 2016, 05:59 PM
A nice set. It seems they are the local equivalent of shrikes.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_magpie

Harold

iso
5th December 2016, 06:54 PM
Admittedly this guy is on the scraggy side, although all are not so. Perhaps like Jonathon Livingston Seagull he chose isolation over conformity, excellence over mediocrity, sagacity over superstition - your typical Aussie as one might say. :D

Believe that and Pigs may fly :):D

pandora
5th December 2016, 07:46 PM
Oh, but they DO .... :D
http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/Untitled-136.jpg (http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/91344)

lanegd01
5th December 2016, 10:23 PM
Magpies tend to mate for life. So it has probably lost its partner. They are very social and do like human company (other than breeding season). Best not to feed them bread as it is bad for their digestion. Mine prefer pellet type cat food. You can have it posing for shots in no time.

pandora
5th December 2016, 11:07 PM
Ian,
Thanks, I was unaware of that.

Nigel,
Our species are apparently adapted to carbs as well as proteins - a healthy balanced Aussie diet you might say :D
Seriously though, it would be rare to see them scavenging carcasses, they leave that fare to the Currawongs and Crows.

Harold,
Thanks for the interesting link.

Lane,
I'm learning a lot about magpies from commentary here. I can testify as to how hostile to humans they are in the breeding season as I've been attacked by them when cycling.

They are also hostile to interloping magpies that encroach upon their territory.
http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/MagP2280863.jpg (http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/91345)

Beagletorque
5th December 2016, 11:11 PM
I can testify as to how hostile to humans they are in the breeding season as I've been attacked by them when cycling.


And we thought you just fell off! :D

pandora
6th December 2016, 05:55 AM
Well was he pushed or did he fall? *shrug

iso
6th December 2016, 08:37 PM
They are also hostile to interloping magpies that encroach upon their territory.

And he only asked the time!!!!

pandora
6th December 2016, 09:32 PM
And what makes human behaviours more "civilized" than that of our feathered friends? *shrug

David M
6th December 2016, 11:46 PM
Ian,
Thanks, I was unaware of that.

Nigel,
Our species are apparently adapted to carbs as well as proteins - a healthy balanced Aussie diet you might say :D
Seriously though, it would be rare to see them scavenging carcasses, they leave that fare to the Currawongs and Crows.

Harold,
Thanks for the interesting link.

Lane,
I'm learning a lot about magpies from commentary here. I can testify as to how hostile to humans they are in the breeding season as I've been attacked by them when cycling.

They are also hostile to interloping magpies that encroach upon their territory.
http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/MagP2280863.jpg (http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/91345)

I know Ian said that they're not members of the Crow family but that behavior reminds me of some Corvid species.