PDA

View Full Version : Incredible!


pandora
30th November 2016, 10:16 AM
Last night through my website contact form I received an incredible message from a Deb & Scott xxxxxx

"Photography
I am trying to track down the gentleman that did the photography for my wedding in 1995."

I ​guessed they were a Launceston (Tasmanian) couple whose wedding I photographed 21 years ago, such is the power of Reach World Wide Web, (http://www.reachwww.com.au/)who designed and created my website.

I replied:
​Hello Deb - Thank you for your message received through my website.
I photographed many ​weddings during 1995 in Tasmania, your names sound familiar, perhaps it was me. How can I help? Regards, Mark

Deb replied:
Hi Mark - I was married 21 Jan at Holy Trinity in Westbury, the reason for my contact is: you had on display in the window of Smart Set 2 prints
1) of the train of my dress
2) a pic of myself and m-in-law meeting in the aisle of the church
I was hoping to be able to purchase those of possible.

Regards Deb
Sent from my iPhone

I replied:
Hi Deb - How wonderful to hear from you after twenty odd years, I do remember your wedding albeit hazily. I believe I photographed you and Scott and your attendants after the ceremony at Culzean Gardens, Westbury, correct?
Unfortunately, on retirement some 10yrs ago after relocating to Victoria, I destroyed all my wedding files believing that they would never again be needed. I can only apologise.
That said, I would be very interested to hear how you and Scott are getting along, I guess you have a grown up family by now? Are you still living in Northern Tasmania?
Hope to hear more from you, Deb. Regards to you both, Mark.

Deb replied :
Hi Mark, still living in the same place. We have two boys aged 21 and 19. Very impressed you remember so many details. You and your wife were a great partnership.

Regards Deb
Sent from my iPhone

Question: So should I be have kept all those bulky negs for the past twenty years from hundreds of weddings, like a dung beetle pushing its dung ball over life's rocky terrain?
I just think it incredible that after all these years she should have Googled and found me, especially as mine isn't a photography website - shows just how effective search engines are!

(ongoing)

Ian
30th November 2016, 10:34 AM
When the studio that provided our wedding photography shut up shop they contacted us offering our negatives for a nominal sum (£50 if I recall). I grabbed the offer :)

Ian

drmarkf
30th November 2016, 11:57 AM
Lovely and interesting story.

No, you can't be expected to have kept those.

When I retired 2y ago I gave or threw away all my work-related books that I wasn't going to need in my current part-time and specialised role, and my entire work-related slide collection (mostly analogue). I took the view that I needed the space more than the value I'd ever get from it, and the same applies to your situation I think.

Some of my colleagues took some of the slides and about 15% of the books, but the rest was securely destroyed (medical confidentiality affecting many of the slides, of course)

Presumably there's more value in keeping digital wedding image files nowadays since the actual and virtual cost of storage is much lower and they'll be a lot easier to find.

Naughty Nigel
30th November 2016, 01:23 PM
Wedding photographs provide precious memories for most of us, therefore I do believe that wedding photographers should be under some obligation to keep negatives, or files for a reasonable time, and to offer these to the couple when they no longer want to keep them.

I tried to obtain prints or negatives from our wedding photographer about ten years after the event, but was told that the photographer has passed on, and all of the negatives were destroyed as they took up too much space. I was also asked, "what would you do with medium format negatives anyway? "

I find it strange that wedding photographers go to great lengths to protect their copyright, but then ditch the negatives when they take up too much space.

Like Ian, I would have gladly paid £50 for them if the offer had been made.

iso
30th November 2016, 05:33 PM
Mark. That's a tough one of those hindsight things, but after 21 years, no way could you be expected to keep all that stuff. I had a similar thing when I retired, should I keep examples of all the work my Marketing Agency had done over the previous 30 years? No, best to move on. In any event a strange request. Did they not originally have those shots? How come she remembered them so well and yet not purchased them at the time?
Don't get beaten up with it, much more important things to be doing *zzz

Beagletorque
30th November 2016, 05:51 PM
It does demonstrate what a fantastic memory you have! I can't remember what I was doing last week, let alone 20 years ago...

Petrochemist
30th November 2016, 06:01 PM
I suspect today's digital world might change the likely hood of images being kept, still not much chance 20 years later but a folder of RAW files is a lot easier to hang onto than several filing cabinets of Negs.

iso
30th November 2016, 06:18 PM
I suspect today's digital world might change the likely hood of images being kept, still not much chance 20 years later but a folder of RAW files is a lot easier to hang onto than several filing cabinets of Negs.



Well I wonder re storage – most say that CD/DVD discs can degenerate so could be the same for hard drives (even solid state ones). As for ‘Cloud’ stuff, that rather depends on who controls the Universe at the time. And of course there is a query over future software ability to read back to the past.
I actually believe ‘digital’ is reducing the possibility of accessing the ‘public record’ . How many now have a physical record of their snaps?

pandora
30th November 2016, 07:06 PM
@Ian - Yes, in hindsight I should have done likewise.

@Mark - It does boil down to a space vs. value situation as you say. At the time of disposal I had not had an enquiry for some years.

@Nigel - A very good argument.

@iso - It may well be that the prints that Deb referred to were blow-ups for window display. My memory is not up to that level of detail.

@Andew - Ah yes, you are talking short term memory. Now what have I done with my keys!

@Mike -Indeed, had the wedding been shot digitally there is every possibility that I would still have them. 21 years ago digital photography was in its infancy.

Petrochemist
30th November 2016, 07:12 PM
Well I wonder re storage – most say that CD/DVD discs can degenerate so could be the same for hard drives (even solid state ones). As for ‘Cloud’ stuff, that rather depends on who controls the Universe at the time. And of course there is a query over future software ability to read back to the past.
I actually believe ‘digital’ is reducing the possibility of accessing the ‘public record’ . How many now have a physical record of their snaps?

I think one of the PCs in use at work is nearly 20 years old (It's running windows 98 & I upgraded the OS!) the software it'd running was written for windows 3.x
Hard drive still OK on that.

I'd be very surprised if the ability for museums to read JPEG, DOC, PDF etc wasn't maintained for a considerable time. Some forms of media will prove more awkward 5.25" floppies are not easy to read these days. But most other common storage media should still be readable - perhaps Jazz drives and the like might also prove tricky - with any sort of active updating digital data will get tend to get copied to new media as the old is phased out.
On my PC here I still have documents I created in 2002, copied from 2 previous PCs. At work I know I have data files going back to the middle of 1995 when our lab data system went from a midi computer to networked PCs, and documents that predate that.

Many of the colour film photographs I have are showing signs of deterioration.

DerekW
30th November 2016, 07:25 PM
Loss of social history started with the introduction of colour images as they fade. It is the B&W images of the past that are still standing up to scrutiny OK.

Petrochemist
30th November 2016, 07:52 PM
@Mike -Indeed, had the wedding been shot digitally there is every possibility that I would still have them. 21 years ago digital photography was in its infancy.

I didn't think for a moment you'd have shot a wedding in digital back then. It was very much a low res market only used for new style reporting where the images had to be sent rapidly.

Digital expectations will have effected the thinking of the client however. They quite probably have their own images from ~10 years ago. It's very easy to forget how different things were. The fact they managed to track you down at all reflects just how much things have changed.

Naughty Nigel
30th November 2016, 09:30 PM
Well I wonder re storage – most say that CD/DVD discs can degenerate so could be the same for hard drives (even solid state ones). As for ‘Cloud’ stuff, that rather depends on who controls the Universe at the time. And of course there is a query over future software ability to read back to the past.
I actually believe ‘digital’ is reducing the possibility of accessing the ‘public record’ . How many now have a physical record of their snaps?

Believe it or not, tape has the best long term archival properties, and is approved for legal file storage,

Linear Tape Open (LTO) tapes are designed for 15 to 30 years of archival storage.

Linear Tape Open - WIKI (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linear_Tape-Open)

pandora
30th November 2016, 10:01 PM
@Mike - Too true. When I mentioned having received the unexpected message to my website designer, she reminded me of how traceable I now am due to the power of the WIX's SEO (search engine optimisation) ability. I can thoroughly recommend www.reachwww.com.au (http://www.reachwww.com.au/) to anyone looking for an extremely talented website creator who won't rip you off.

AMc
1st December 2016, 09:31 AM
I took some digital photos for a web site we developed in 2000 for a Shakespeare production starring Ralph Fiennes - I had cause to look at the CD-R backups last week and they were all readable.
One significant problem the original JPG files opened easily, but all the edited versions were saved from an antique version of Paintshop Pro which I don't have any way of opening any more. I guess I could rebuild an XP or 98 machine and install the software which I also have on CD, but I doubt I'll bother!

As above I suspect common formats like BMP, JPG and TIFF will be openable for generations - I would be less optimistic about camera specific RAW files remaining usable in a decade or two. I guess reverse engineering them will be trivial at some point in the future if there is a will.

OM USer
1st December 2016, 10:56 AM
I have some old Microsoft Word files which my current version (Office 2007) will not open without some registry hacks. As it knows they are old Word files why can't it just ask me to confirm if I want to open them? Luckily I saved the files as text documents as well and these are perfectly readable.

shenstone
1st December 2016, 12:05 PM
@Mike - Too true. When I mentioned having received the unexpected message to my website designer, she reminded me of how traceable I now am due to the power of the WIX's SEO (search engine optimisation) ability. I can thoroughly recommend www.reachwww.com.au (http://www.reachwww.com.au/) to anyone looking for an extremely talented website creator who won't rip you off.

I think you mean via the power of google. just structure your site correctly and
google and other engines will crawl it successfully. I don't recommend any SEO tools to anyone I work with as I have yet to see any of them make a meaningful difference

pandora
1st December 2016, 12:57 PM
I took some digital photos for a web site we developed in 2000 for a Shakespeare production starring Ralph Fiennes - I had cause to look at the CD-R backups last week and they were all readable.
One significant problem the original JPG files opened easily, but all the edited versions were saved from an antique version of Paintshop Pro which I don't have any way of opening any more. I guess I could rebuild an XP or 98 machine and install the software which I also have on CD, but I doubt I'll bother!

As above I suspect common formats like BMP, JPG and TIFF will be openable for generations - I would be less optimistic about camera specific RAW files remaining usable in a decade or two. I guess reverse engineering them will be trivial at some point in the future if there is a will.
I too cut my image editing teeth on Paintshop Pro before moving on to Photoshop. And like you, I also wonder whether my legacy of image files will remain readable by generations to come.

I have some old Microsoft Word files which my current version (Office 2007) will not open without some registry hacks. As it knows they are old Word files why can't it just ask me to confirm if I want to open them? Luckily I saved the files as text documents as well and these are perfectly readable.
I too run Microsoft Word, Office 2007 but have no old Word files to cause issues.

I think you mean via the power of google. just structure your site correctly and
google and other engines will crawl it successfully. I don't recommend any SEO tools to anyone I work with as I have yet to see any of them make a meaningful difference

I can only repeat the advice from my highly experienced website designer who says that the WIX SEO is the best she's used. She proved its effectiveness by blowing another "Mark Greenhill" listing from the top of the page and replacing his with mine. I was most impressed. As I understand it, WIX SEO is able to influence the way Google preferences its listings. The professionalism of my website designer is evidenced by the way she has created mine and has also tutored me in managing it..
Furthermore, her fee is extremely affordable and she will happily transfer ownership of the site as soon as you wish with no ongoing fees aside from the annual fee levied by WIX.

http://www.reachwww.com.au/

iso
1st December 2016, 07:04 PM
Very good point about camera specific RAW*yes

iso
1st December 2016, 07:12 PM
Don't knock SEO's. I looked into the dark art a few years ago, on behalf of Clients, and decided effective optimisation is not an idiot's game. Google for example used to keep changing the 'rules' on how they ranked sites. (Do they still?). Structure is important, but more so is a continual updating programme (not major stuff, just fiddling).

shenstone
1st December 2016, 08:44 PM
Apologies all I should not have hijacked this thread with those comments about SEO's - whatever caused it it's incredible how these days you can track someone down using the internet.

I know I am visible as my name is on the contact pages for a wildlife charity I help with and people have used that

When I bought my Land Rover I found a scrap of paper in a cupboard and within 10 minutes I found the previous but one owner and knew he was an expert in internet security and privacy and had his phone number (sic) I gave him a call and we have been in touch since

I think you took a big decision getting rid of those negtives, but I understand the hassle in keeping them. I just head to search every box of slides under the bed (and there are lots) to find a picture that a magazine wants of an event that took place in about 1990. i just can't bring my self to ditch them but once I retire i may have a serious scanning/culling session to reduce the clutter

Re the comments on digital storage the best way is to continue to move it forwards onto fresh media from time to time (whether that be CD, Tape or HD) and there should always be more than 2 copies so you can deal with any issues that come up.

I agree formats are difficult when they change. In the time I've been in IT (about 30 years) I have been involved in more than one data recovery exercise so far we have been sucessful, but there will be a day when we are not.

iso
1st December 2016, 09:22 PM
Many years ago – and it’s terrifying how long ago that seems – someone wrote a book titled ‘Future Shock’. A very simple analysis that compared as an example, how long it took for the Typewriter to be accepted into working practice, compared with the fax machine. Something like 75 years to 2 years. When you look at camera history the same pace applies. I think one of his best examples was of a child asked to go fetch something from a local Store (USA). The kid came back without it (Maybe couldn’t find the shop), – However he said to his Parents – ‘Couldn’t find the Store – must have been pulled down’.