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bilbo
16th November 2016, 02:15 PM
I don't understand. I just don't understand why this image won. *shrug

http://www.npg.org.uk/whatson/twppp-2016/exhibition/prize-winners.php?utm_source=wordfly&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=SM-MKT%3ATWPPP2016winnerannouncement&utm_content=version_B&promo=389

Graham_of_Rainham
16th November 2016, 03:21 PM
I say the same every year... :confused:

Total controversy seems to be the brief to the judges.

Naughty Nigel
16th November 2016, 03:32 PM
We obviously have it all wrong then.

The winning photograph looks like almost any bog standard school photograph, except the child is looking unusually miserable for being out of class.

The third placed photograph of a man wearing a lamp shade is no better.

The second and fourth placed photographs I just don't get. :rolleyes:

Sorry.

Daveart
16th November 2016, 03:36 PM
Well, I wouldn't even give a second look to any of the three prised winners.
It is getting worse each year, I did used to enter, and got pretty close, but then quality was good. Wouldn't say that today though.

Naughty Nigel
16th November 2016, 04:02 PM
'Celebrating mediocrity' seems to be the ethos of the 21st century, although it started a few years before the millennium in the UK. :(

Nowadays it seems judges, and even other photographers are more interested in EXIF data than actual photographs and their composition.

I gave up entering competitions and displaying photographs online after some clever sod complained that I had taken the photographs on a Nikon LS9000C camera, and not on the brand of the forum concerned.

How I got that camera up the hill, focused it and plugged it into the mains I shall never know. :mad:

(Google 'Nikon LS9000C' and it will make more sense.)

Zuiko
16th November 2016, 04:23 PM
We obviously have it all wrong then.

The winning photograph looks like almost any bog standard school photograph, except the child is looking unusually miserable for being out of class.

The third placed photograph of a man wearing a lamp shade is no better.

The second and fourth placed photographs I just don't get. :rolleyes:

Sorry.

Exactly what Nigel said. *yes

OM USer
16th November 2016, 04:33 PM
The first one is churned out in some form by the thousands by school photographers everywhere. Nothing special about this one. The fourth one was mentioned briefly in the papers as it was the artist's first modelling session. I've seen better pictures on this forum every day!

Naughty Nigel
16th November 2016, 04:39 PM
The first one is churned out in some form by the thousands by school photographers everywhere. Nothing special about this one.

Maybe the photographer is hoping to get a job with Tempest Photography or suchlike? :(

I just hope he's been CRB checked. :rolleyes:

Ian
16th November 2016, 04:48 PM
Hehe, that's what Art is all about :D

Ian

Zuiko
16th November 2016, 04:55 PM
Maybe my daughter should enter next year. This is a self portrait she took recently as part of a project depicting the repression and stereotyping of women for her A level course. She did her make-up herself, to achieve a manikin like appearance and reinforced this by sewing thread onto the print to represent puppet strings. I think she did quite well, not least for manoeuvring the tripod in our tiny kitchen!

http://www.e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/img130_e_c_r_s.jpg

Naughty Nigel
16th November 2016, 04:59 PM
Very good work, but far too original for Taylor Wessing I'm afraid. :(

Crazy Dave
16th November 2016, 05:17 PM
Hang on guys! All of them are not that bad. Especially the profile image to be seen on this NPG page.

http://www.npg.org.uk/whatson/twppp-2016/exhibition.php

Just returned home from the NPG, with a warm glow from having my photo selected. First time entry and using my wonderful OM-D EM-5. Even you hardened blokes would have had a lump in the throat to have seen a wonderful image taken by a young man confined to a wheelchair with severe physical and other difficulties. Simply amazing and life affirming.

Oh, and one more thing, I printed 44 x 33cms for the exhibition not daring to go bigger. I needn't have worried, it looks great at about 6ft x 8ft at the exhibition entrance.

One happy feller.

David

Naughty Nigel
16th November 2016, 05:25 PM
Hang on guys! All of them are not that bad. Especially the profile image to be seen on this NPG page.

http://www.npg.org.uk/whatson/twppp-2016/exhibition.php

Just returned home from the NPG, with a warm glow from having my photo selected. First time entry and using my wonderful OM-D EM-5. Even you hardened blokes would have had a lump in the throat to have seen a wonderful image taken by a young man confined to a wheelchair with severe physical and other difficulties. Simply amazing and life affirming.

Oh, and one more thing, I printed 44 x 33cms for the exhibition not daring to go bigger. I needn't have worried, it looks great at about 6ft x 8ft at the exhibition entrance.

One happy feller.

David

I agree with you that some of the entries are of a high standard; but do you really think the winners are worthy of the accolade?

Crazy Dave
16th November 2016, 06:18 PM
It's kind of difficult for me having come through the traditional camera club route, to see what others with far greater knowledge see in the photos under discussion. I see things pictorially or straight. Some of the exhibits I've seen today are truly moving once you've heard the story. The autistic girl from Mongolia, the granddaughter portraying her grandfather's decline and eventual passing, the brothel visitors.

I'm trying hard to understand what I'm presented with, I realise I may not get there, I need the narrative. So, I am trying to unlearn. One move is to step away from the RPS aesthetic with its obsession with technical perfection and almost devoid of any appreciation of the emotional impact of a photograph. I've seen enough in the last two weeks to confirm my deliberations about not renewing my membership. Fortunately, there's plenty of other exciting work out there that I'm going to try to get to grips with.

Hope this contributes to the debate.


David

Phill D
16th November 2016, 07:36 PM
In competitions like this don't the judges publish something that explains (or justifies) why the photographs have won? personally I don't see much in them either but then what do I know. Thinking about it though actually it does give me some encouragement if shots like that can win prizes ;) The ones Dave linked to though do have more going for them not sure why they didn't win?

Zuiko
16th November 2016, 07:46 PM
Hang on guys! All of them are not that bad. Especially the profile image to be seen on this NPG page.

http://www.npg.org.uk/whatson/twppp-2016/exhibition.php

Just returned home from the NPG, with a warm glow from having my photo selected. First time entry and using my wonderful OM-D EM-5. Even you hardened blokes would have had a lump in the throat to have seen a wonderful image taken by a young man confined to a wheelchair with severe physical and other difficulties. Simply amazing and life affirming.

Oh, and one more thing, I printed 44 x 33cms for the exhibition not daring to go bigger. I needn't have worried, it looks great at about 6ft x 8ft at the exhibition entrance.

One happy feller.

David

To be honest, Dave, from the entries I've seen so far yours should have won by a country mile. Well done! *chr

Crazy Dave
16th November 2016, 08:09 PM
http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/2009/FullSizeRender.jpg (http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/show photo.php/photo/91216)

Last night's award ceremony. Can't tell you what that felt like seeing my entry displayed as a banner. Wife's iPhone

Our very own Norman Smith in the foreground. Looking forward to seeing his pics. Thank you John

David

Crazy Dave
16th November 2016, 08:24 PM
I don't understand. I just don't understand why this image won. *shrug

http://www.npg.org.uk/whatson/twppp-2016/exhibition/prize-winners.php?utm_source=wordfly&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=SM-MKT%3ATWPPP2016winnerannouncement&utm_content=version_B&promo=389

Hi Brian

Here is an excerpt from the NPG News Release today announcing the winner Claudio Rasano.

"The winning Portrait, part of Rasano's series 'Similar Uniforms: We refuse to compare' was taken in February 2016, in Johannesburg, South Arica and focuses on issues of preserving individuality in the context of school uniforms. The photograph was shot in daylight, outdoors and in front of a plain white paper background.

Rasano explains "Children themselves have been known to rebel against uniforms, especially as they approach the awkward age characterised by the need to fit in and the desire to stand out, all at the same time. Some experts too have spoken out against school uniforms on the grounds that they surprise individuality and diversity"

Well, there you have it. Convinced? Not sure I am.

Regards

David

Zuiko
16th November 2016, 09:13 PM
http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/2009/FullSizeRender.jpg (http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/show photo.php/photo/91216)

Last night's award ceremony. Can't tell you what that felt like seeing my entry displayed as a banner. Wife's iPhone

Our very own Norman Smith in the foreground. Looking forward to seeing his pics. Thank you John

David

I'm curious that they chose your image for a huge banner rather than the winner. That speaks volumes so far as I'm concerned!

shenstone
16th November 2016, 09:33 PM
I'm curious that they chose your image for a huge banner rather than the winner. That speaks volumes so far as I'm concerned!

Someone in the organisation had better taste!

bilbo
16th November 2016, 09:40 PM
Hi Brian

Here is an excerpt from the NPG News Release today announcing the winner Claudio Rasano.

"The winning Portrait, part of Rasano's series 'Similar Uniforms: We refuse to compare' was taken in February 2016, in Johannesburg, South Arica and focuses on issues of preserving individuality in the context of school uniforms. The photograph was shot in daylight, outdoors and in front of a plain white paper background.

Rasano explains "Children themselves have been known to rebel against uniforms, especially as they approach the awkward age characterised by the need to fit in and the desire to stand out, all at the same time. Some experts too have spoken out against school uniforms on the grounds that they surprise individuality and diversity"

Well, there you have it. Convinced? Not sure I am.

Regards

David

Yes. I did read that and I sighed. And no, I'm not at all convinced. Your picture, I like though! *chr

raichea
16th November 2016, 10:05 PM
Clicking on each of the images brings up a panel with background info and a summary of the judges' views.

Naughty Nigel
16th November 2016, 11:15 PM
It's kind of difficult for me having come through the traditional camera club route, to see what others with far greater knowledge see in the photos under discussion. I see things pictorially or straight. Some of the exhibits I've seen today are truly moving once you've heard the story. The autistic girl from Mongolia, the granddaughter portraying her grandfather's decline and eventual passing, the brothel visitors.

I'm trying hard to understand what I'm presented with, I realise I may not get there, I need the narrative. So, I am trying to unlearn. One move is to step away from the RPS aesthetic with its obsession with technical perfection and almost devoid of any appreciation of the emotional impact of a photograph. I've seen enough in the last two weeks to confirm my deliberations about not renewing my membership. Fortunately, there's plenty of other exciting work out there that I'm going to try to get to grips with.

Hope this contributes to the debate.


David

That is an interesting viewpoint David, which I am grateful for. I am sure there is a lot more to some of these photographs than meets the eye. But without the background information we can only view the photographs as we see them.

My wife has some photographs of her late father that she took on her old phone at a family gathering shortly after her dad was diagnosed with a terminal condition and given weeks to live. The resolution is very poor, (640 x 480 I think), so the image quality is dire. They certainly wouldn't' print well, but they have great emotional value to my wife. But would that make them worthy winners of a prestigious photographic competition? I think not.

Phill D
17th November 2016, 06:51 AM
Thanks Steve. Now I've read the explanation words I'm still not sure I'm any the wiser.

raichea
17th November 2016, 07:34 AM
Me neither

pdk42
17th November 2016, 08:37 AM
Surely a photograph that is good enough to win a major prestigious portrait competition should stand alone and not need a narrative to justify its status? It might be different if it were reportage or battlefield shots etc, but a portrait?

Crazy Dave's shot has massive visual impact and can be appreciated without a half page of A4 to explain it. Like others here I don't understand the judges' decision on the winner.

Ricoh
17th November 2016, 08:45 AM
The competition is rigged.

pdk42
17th November 2016, 08:56 AM
The competition is rigged.

Why do you think that Steve?

drmarkf
17th November 2016, 09:04 AM
I went dutifully to the TW portrait exhibitions in 2012, 2013 and 2014, but I haven't been since.

Taylor Wessing are corporate lawyers, and (with some honourable exceptions!) in my humble opinion they attract and reward safe and corporate images. For challenging and interesting portraits (mostly paintings, though) I recommend the BP awards.

I do however like the images of the New Work winner - have a look at his website. For me this is on a completely different level from the bland, depth-free main winners.

drmarkf
17th November 2016, 09:12 AM
Maybe my daughter should enter next year. This is a self portrait she took recently as part of a project depicting the repression and stereotyping of women for her A level course. She did her make-up herself, to achieve a manikin like appearance and reinforced this by sewing thread onto the print to represent puppet strings. I think she did quite well, not least for manoeuvring the tripod in our tiny kitchen!

http://www.e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/img130_e_c_r_s.jpg

This is absolutely great!

Does your daughter know the work of Cindy Sherman the American photographer:

https://www.artsy.net/artwork/cindy-sherman-untitled-film-still-number-84

Well worth exploring I would suggest.

She might also be interested to see the 1970s Feminist photography exhibition at the Photographers Gallery in London if she hasn't been: http://thephotographersgallery.org.uk/feminist-avant-garde-of-the-1970s-works-from-the-verbund-collection-7-october-2016-8-january-20
[Some of us grizzled ageing male members of this forum might find that show to be a bit over-obsessed with female bodily functions, but it does honestly also contain some really superb images!]

iso
17th November 2016, 07:12 PM
Hey Folks - Just what is Photography about? I seem to remember that it was originally about a RECORD of things. So I agree all that stuff in the Wessing Awards was sooo up...

Graham_of_Rainham
17th November 2016, 11:53 PM
I've come to the conclusion that Taylor Wessing, Master of Photography, etc., is much more about "artists" that can't paint, than it is about good quality, technically excellent photography.

drmarkf
18th November 2016, 09:29 AM
Of the brand-sponsored photo competitions I go to regularly, I'd recommend the Sony awards as attracting a wide range of often-challenging submissions and (IMHO) being willing to make awards to non-corporate-friendly images in a range of categories. I always try to go to the show at Somerset House in May.

Is anyone else enjoying the Artist of the Year series on Sky Arts?

'Landscape' is currently in its second season, and they did a 'Portrait' one a couple of years ago. It's presented in a light-hearted and unpretentious style by Joan Bakewell and Frank Skinner. I find it fascinating to see the different ways painters (and sometimes those working in other media) envision and then build up their works*.

It's so different from the pretentious, obfuscated rubbish that characterized that Masters of Photography series.

[* I also find Kate Bryan, one of the judges, very easy on the eye, which helps...]

Zuiko
18th November 2016, 11:58 AM
This is absolutely great!

Does your daughter know the work of Cindy Sherman the American photographer:

https://www.artsy.net/artwork/cindy-sherman-untitled-film-still-number-84

Well worth exploring I would suggest.

She might also be interested to see the 1970s Feminist photography exhibition at the Photographers Gallery in London if she hasn't been: http://thephotographersgallery.org.uk/feminist-avant-garde-of-the-1970s-works-from-the-verbund-collection-7-october-2016-8-january-20
[Some of us grizzled ageing male members of this forum might find that show to be a bit over-obsessed with female bodily functions, but it does honestly also contain some really superb images!]

Thanks Mark,

She has been to the exhibition, but I'm not sure if she is familiar with the work of Cindy Sherman. I'll pass her the link. :)

iso
18th November 2016, 07:06 PM
Maybe my daughter should enter next year. This is a self portrait she took recently as part of a project depicting the repression and stereotyping of women for her A level course. She did her make-up herself, to achieve a manikin like appearance and reinforced this by sewing thread onto the print to represent puppet strings. I think she did quite well, not least for manoeuvring the tripod in our tiny kitchen!

http://www.e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/img130_e_c_r_s.jpg

I find it sad that even in 2016, women/girls whatever, should feel that still they are regarded as a stereotype. Zuiko - This is NO WAY a comment about your daughter and her 'record of the human condition'. And it's a great Photograph - made me THINK

Zuiko
18th November 2016, 08:59 PM
I find it sad that even in 2016, women/girls whatever, should feel that still they are regarded as a stereotype. Zuiko - This is NO WAY a comment about your daughter and her 'record of the human condition'. And it's a great Photograph - made me THINK

Personally, I think in Western society we have made tremendous progress regarding the rights and treatment of women - after all it is less than 100 years since women gained the right to vote in the UK. To me it seems bizarre in the extreme that women were ever excluded, but there we are. Unfortunately there are still men who stereotype women, or exploit or abuse them and the new POTUS elect certainly represents a significant step backwards in this respect. What happens in America is bound to eventually influence attitudes in Britain. Ironically, my daughter is one of the most untypical young women you could ever meet.

Naughty Nigel
18th November 2016, 10:59 PM
Unfortunately there are still men who stereotype women, or exploit or abuse them and the new POTUS elect certainly represents a significant step backwards in this respect. What happens in America is bound to eventually influence attitudes in Britain.

In the interests of balance, it would also be true to say that there are quite a few women who stereotype men, but that is another story. :D

With regard to the USA, I would say that American society was some way behind Europe and the UK in many respects, even before the recent presidential elections.

iso
19th November 2016, 06:05 PM
In the interests of balance, it would also be true to say that there are quite a few women who stereotype men, but that is another story. :D

With regard to the USA, I would say that American society was some way behind Europe and the UK in many respects, even before the recent presidential elections.

Totally agree with you on both points. :(

Zuiko
19th November 2016, 08:04 PM
In the interests of balance, it would also be true to say that there are quite a few women who stereotype men, but that is another story. :D

With regard to the USA, I would say that American society was some way behind Europe and the UK in many respects, even before the recent presidential elections.

Us men are pretty good at stereotyping ourselves. I once overheard a conversation between two male colleagues, which went like this:-

"Women, hey. Still, what would we do without them?"

Without even thinking, the second bloke replied, "Oh, drink more beer and watch more football."

See what I mean? Us guys are much less complicated. If humans came with an instruction manual, two pages would be dedicated to men and 150 pages to women.

Now who's stereotyping? :o

Naughty Nigel
19th November 2016, 09:28 PM
Us men are pretty good at stereotyping ourselves. I once overheard a conversation between two male colleagues, which went like this:-

"Women, hey. Still, what would we do without them?"

Without even thinking, the second bloke replied, "Oh, drink more beer and watch more football."

See what I mean? Us guys are much less complicated. If humans came with an instruction manual, two pages would be dedicated to men and 150 pages to women.

Now who's stereotyping? :o

But then some women would say that every man has three faults:

Everything we think;

Everything we say; and,

Everything we do.

My wife would probably add three more;

Things that men don't think about;

Things that men never say; and,

Things that men always forget to do. :D

I should add, these criticisms are made even before I have forgotten to do anything! :D

crimbo
20th November 2016, 12:17 AM
Do like the second in the TW
and do like Zuiko daughters image

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk

iso
20th November 2016, 05:47 PM
Us men are pretty good at stereotyping ourselves. I once overheard a conversation between two male colleagues, which went like this:-

"Women, hey. Still, what would we do without them?"

Without even thinking, the second bloke replied, "Oh, drink more beer and watch more football."

See what I mean? Us guys are much less complicated. If humans came with an instruction manual, two pages would be dedicated to men and 150 pages to women.

Now who's stereotyping? :o

Er John - There is no Manual for a Woman - You can't 'instruct' them:(