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sapper
14th November 2016, 01:12 PM
I am thinking of getting a camera that has been converted for infra red. Saw this on the auction site, http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/112198865826?_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT.
A Pen E-PL1.
I don't know these cameras, is it a late model? Worth going for?

alfbranch
14th November 2016, 02:41 PM
There are no shots of the results achieved with it.

Who did the conversion?

alfbranch
14th November 2016, 02:47 PM
As I would like an Infra red camera I am interested in this too

Looking at his feedback he has sold a few conversions to people who were happy

http://feedback.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewFeedback2&userid=timfraser&ftab=FeedbackAsSeller&searchInterval=30

Ian
14th November 2016, 03:46 PM
I had an E-PL1 converted to 720nm IR by Advanced Camera Services in Norfolk back in 2011. It wasn't cheap at 312 inc.VAT. I get good results but this wavelength is more oriented towards mono IR though colour is possible.

The E-PL1 is an early Pen but its menu system will look quite familar.

Also seen this: http://www.protechrepairs.co.uk/infrared_conversion.html

Some lenses do exhibit hot spots. There is some information here:

http://fourthirds-user.com/wiki/Infra_red_hot_spots

Contributions to expand this wiki page are very welcome :)

Ian

PS, my camera is available for hire!

sapper
14th November 2016, 04:25 PM
Thanks guys, very helpful.

Petrochemist
15th November 2016, 05:47 PM
I find a full spectrum conversion much more flexible on a mirrorless body. The cameras EVF means there's no issues with framing with a dark filter on the lens, so all sorts of conversions can be tried :)

Ian
15th November 2016, 10:30 PM
I find a full spectrum conversion much more flexible on a mirrorless body. The cameras EVF means there's no issues with framing with a dark filter on the lens, so all sorts of conversions can be tried :)

In case this isn't clear, a full spectrum conversion means the I/R filter in the camera is not replaced with a different one, just optically clear glass. This means you can choose the level of I/R filtering by using filters on the lens and there fore you aren't stuck with one wavelength. The cost is that not all lenses will take the same size filters, etc.

Ian

Petrochemist
15th November 2016, 11:19 PM
In case this isn't clear, a full spectrum conversion means the I/R filter in the camera is not replaced with a different one, just optically clear glass. This means you can choose the level of I/R filtering by using filters on the lens and there fore you aren't stuck with one wavelength. The cost is that not all lenses will take the same size filters, etc.

Ian
Thanks Ian , I guess further explanation was needed:p

Actually a full spectrum conversion should have the internal cut filter replaced with quartz not glass. Glass reduces the UV response significantly so that would normally be called a two spectrum conversion. There do seem to be a few conversion services that don't understand this distinction.

While not all my native lenses take the same size filters stepping rings make this a very minor inconvenience. Quite a few of the more exotic filters I have aren't available as standard screw on filters. I only have them as 25mm glass circles and I've only seen them larger as 50mm squares. 25mm discs actually work OK on my 17mm 2.8 as well as a few of my adapted lenses (c-mounts, most enlarger lenses & my 600mm CAT).
Some of the filter options I use are adjustable (Variable wavelength IR & variable ND, both transmit IR & allow the proportion of visible to be varied) which isn't very practical inside the bodies interior. :D

sapper
16th November 2016, 08:26 AM
Thanks for this info guys. This is much more complicated than I thought.

RogerMac
16th November 2016, 10:02 AM
I have a Pen EP-1 that takes very good IR photos without any conversion. I use an old IR filter left over from my film days to block out any visible light. There is enough light to hand hold in sunlight although darker conditions do require a tripod. Both AF and auto exposure work.

birdboy
16th November 2016, 10:38 AM
I have also been looking at getting my OMD EM1 :eek:converted to a full spectrum so as to use selective filters for astrophotography. As well as the other sites mentioned above I found this one very informative. Its not at all straight forward as to which band of wavelength you would require.

https://www.lifepixel.com/

Why are all these services available in the USA but not over here?:mad:

alfbranch
16th November 2016, 04:20 PM
I have a Pen EP-1 that takes very good IR photos without any conversion. I use an old IR filter left over from my film days to block out any visible light. There is enough light to hand hold in sunlight although darker conditions do require a tripod. Both AF and auto exposure work.
Show some results and what filter is it.


Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk

RogerMac
17th November 2016, 01:21 AM
Show some results and what filter is it. [please]


Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/1939/IR4-800.jpg (http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/91219)

and it's a Hoya INFRARED (R72)

drmarkf
17th November 2016, 09:18 AM
This is an interesting and useful thread: I've had an EPL-1 sitting on the shelf for years while I've been thinking about getting it converted...

Petrochemist
18th November 2016, 10:10 AM
Thanks for this info guys. This is much more complicated than I thought.

I found getting interesting results very easy, but like all photography there's always more to learn. You can basically make the field as complicated as you like :)

Perhaps it might be useful to add a link to an IR dedicated forum (http://global-infrared.freeforums.net/)
There's quiet a bit of info there as well as loads of example images covering monochrome to extreme psychedelic, mostly with filter info.

RogerMac
23rd November 2016, 10:36 PM
With relation to this thread I had my EP-1 with me when I walked round the National Portrait gallery and one of the portraits I photographed was of John Done (him of the love poems). On chimping I noticed that the image showed significantly more detail than was visible to the naked eye and I wondered if this was due to the camera's known sensitivity to IR light (see above). Unfortunately that was the only camera I had with me so I could not make any comparisons

Would anyone like to comment

DerekW
23rd November 2016, 11:04 PM
THe regular OM1 reveals more information than you see in the gallery. I think it a property of cameras (or digital cameras) using the various controls in Lightroom you get even more information out of a picture than you can see with your eye.

Kami
26th November 2016, 10:03 PM
I have an EPL-5 IR full-spectrum conversion, as well as my own P&S conversions (two attempts), and a Sigma SD10 (no live view). And I used my Canon P&S on a tripod with no conversion pretty successfully (but with hot-spots).

The EPL-5 sort-of works, but the chap that did it said that Oly's IBIS and dust-reduction systems make it more problematic: "do not try this at home". The company now no longer does Oly conversions.

SO - Panny (older) ? Canikon ?

It also depends what you want the conversion for - landscape ? Then use a tripod and don't worry too much about IBIS - or have it in your lenses instead ?

Live view is pretty essential, I'd say (the SD10 is fun, but very hit-and-miss - a bit like having a film camera, haha).

I enjoy using the camera without IR filter - interesting olde-worlde colours, especially what it does to blacks. And I prefer "goldy" style - use a red filter mostly, rather than IR filters I have. But the flexibility is what I appreciate, even if the shots can be somewhat soft.

...

birdboy
26th November 2016, 10:23 PM
The EPL-5 sort-of works, but the chap that did it said that Oly's IBIS and dust-reduction systems make it more problematic: "do not try this at home". The company now no longer does Oly conversions.

...

Thanks for this gem I was thinking of having one of my OMD's converted to full spectrum and have emailed an enquiry to OLY about doing this still awaiting their reply.

Ian
27th November 2016, 10:08 AM
Thanks for this gem I was thinking of having one of my OMD's converted to full spectrum and have emailed an enquiry to OLY about doing this still awaiting their reply.

I don't think Olympus will have any advice on modifications like this...

Ian

birdboy
27th November 2016, 05:20 PM
I don't think Olympus will have any advice on modifications like this...

Ian

This will be very disappointing if they don't have any advice for those wanting to use Olympus cameras for astrophotography. In many ways the OMD's are ideally suited to this branch of photography not just in sensor performance. A mirrorless camera does not have the lens out of focus issues that a flippy floppy mirror has with separate focusing sensor.

https://www.lifepixel.com/camera-considerations

Another real plus point for the OMD's I am using is the ability to tethered shoot with time lapse, remote focusing and the ability to fine tune the amount of inching in remote focusing. Other manufacturers produce models specific for this branch and they can also be used for "normal" photography as well with the right filters. There is a good range of affordable fast lenses as well.

raichea
27th November 2016, 06:25 PM
I considered getting an E-600 converted some time ago. Protech (mentioned by Ian earlier) didn't do Olympus conversions at that time, nor did anyone else in the UK as far as I could tell.

More recently, I considered getting my E-M5 converted. I did a fair bit of research before again ending up at Protech having discovered that they now can convert Olympus bodies. They did the conversion quite quickly... had the camera back within a week for a total cost of 260 + shipping to them.

I had one minor issue - it seemed that the IS wasn't working when I got the camera back but this turned out to be a setting in the menu system had been switched off. After correcting that setting, the camera appears to work perfectly.

One thing I hadn't realised when I started was the choice of filter wavelength you have to make. There are pros and cons as mentioned previously in this thread. I ended up with 665nm, which allows me to play with false colour techniques and by adding a 720nm get the more traditional look or a 760nm filter to eliminate all visible light.

Some useful links to help select which wavelength you might choose:

http://www.protechrepairs.co.uk/infrared_conversion.html
https://www.lifepixel.com/infrared-filters-choices

IR primer:

https://www.lifepixel.com/infrared-photography-primer

If you fancy converting an Olympus camera yourself:

https://www.lifepixel.com/tutorials/infrared-diy-tutorials/life-pixel-olympus-e-m10mk2-diy-digital-infrared-conversion-tutorial

Ian
27th November 2016, 06:33 PM
This will be very disappointing if they don't have any advice for those wanting to use Olympus cameras for astrophotography. In many ways the OMD's are ideally suited to this branch of photography not just in sensor performance. A mirrorless camera does not have the lens out of focus issues that a flippy floppy mirror has with separate focusing sensor.

https://www.lifepixel.com/camera-considerations

Another real plus point for the OMD's I am using is the ability to tethered shoot with time lapse, remote focusing and the ability to fine tune the amount of inching in remote focusing. Other manufacturers produce models specific for this branch and they can also be used for "normal" photography as well with the right filters. There is a good range of affordable fast lenses as well.

But Olympus isn't in that market and they haven't designed their cameras for this use. You would be best seeking advice from the astrophotography community - it's quite possible that someone has already done a conversion and can share their experience.

Ian

Kami
28th November 2016, 04:05 PM
My Oly was done by Protech, and Kelvin was full of useful advice. Maybe they have started doing Olys again ?

alfbranch
29th November 2016, 09:09 PM
Thanks for this gem I was thinking of having one of my OMD's converted to full spectrum and have emailed an enquiry to OLY about doing this still awaiting their reply.

Have a look at this
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Olympus-E-M5-Mk-II-Mark-2-Full-Spectrum-IR-UV-Astro-Infrared-converted-camera-/182035871816?hash=item2a622ef848:g:Q7UAAOSwPc9W1QB t

birdboy
29th November 2016, 09:34 PM
Thanks Alf I have seen this guys stuff advertised before. There is no shortage of interest in mirrorless cameras with full spectrum in the states. But I thought Olympus should know how their camera is put together and what filters are in there that could come out so it can be used for IR. But as Ian has indicated Oly are not bothered with after sales or customer service they just want to sell overpriced products that has no system compatibility with previous models HLD's batteries etc. Even a fault report I sent on my 300mm F4 has gone without reply.:mad:*sob

Ian
29th November 2016, 10:11 PM
I think that's unfair - it's a bit like asking Toyota how to modify your brand new Avensis to run on propane. Yes some people can do it, but it's a specialist thing done by specialists.

Ian

birdboy
30th November 2016, 01:04 AM
I think that's unfair - it's a bit like asking Toyota how to modify your brand new Avensis to run on propane. Yes some people can do it, but it's a specialist thing done by specialists.

Ian

Sorry you think that is a bit unfair but do you think a polite reply would be in order. I am sure if I asked Toyota if they did such a modification they may recommend someone who does. I sure they would have given a reply.

It is just that I seem to be nowhere with any replies from Oly service.

Ian
30th November 2016, 07:32 AM
Sorry you think that is a bit unfair but do you think a polite reply would be in order. I am sure if I asked Toyota if they did such a modification they may recommend someone who does. I sure they would have given a reply.

It is just that I seem to be nowhere with any replies from Oly service.

I certainly am sorry and duly apologise if you thought I was being impolite - this never came into my head!

I am simply pointing out the reality. It may not be ideal, but that's the way it is and I still think it's unrealistic to expect Olympus to be able to help and, therefore, unfair to complain. The analogous example I gave was simply to illustrate things.

The issue of you having a problem with your lens and Olympus not responding promptly, that's an entirely different matter of course.

Ian

birdboy
30th November 2016, 09:33 AM
I am a bit touchy at the moment Ian and I did not mean to cause any offense either. Kami drew to my attention a valid point about the sensor cleaning and image stabalisation systems that support the Oly sensors and they are indeed very effective. From what I have read on the internet they make it sound very simple to use a modern DSLR / mirrorless camera for full spectrum photography, some even suggesting that you could pull the camera apart yourself and remove the 'offending' IR filter.

I can see nothing wrong with contacting Olympus and asking the questions about such a modification and its likely effect on the performance of the camera. I would just like a reply please Mr Olympus. This issue and that of my lens problems suggests to me that Olympus are not up to the mark with their customer service.