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Olybirder
1st November 2016, 11:10 AM
My other half has just bought a new Mazda 2 to replace her Mini Cooper. It seems to be a lovely little car and is very well equipped with one glaring omission. In common with many new cars Mazda has done away with the full size spare wheel and replaced it with an 'Emergency Flat Tyre Repair Kit' (a can of foam and an air pump.)

A space saver wheel kit is available but it costs around 400! The wheel well is not deep enough to take a full size spare. All my cars have had spare wheels and I have no experience of these kits but I have not heard many good things about them. As she often has to attend meetings in the evenings and spends a fair amount of time driving on her own, I am worried what will happen if she has a puncture. I assume she will have to call Mazda Assist and get them to take the car to a tyre repair shop or call out a mobile fitter at considerable expense. Her Mini had runflat tyres and, although they were extremely expensive and gave a hard ride, they did their job on the occasion when she had a puncture.

So, has anybody had personal experience of these repair kits and, if so, what happened when you had a puncture. Did it work? Could the tyre be repaired afterwards or was it a write off? If it didn't work how was the problem resolved.

Ron

drmarkf
1st November 2016, 11:16 AM
Interesting. All the cars we've owned to date have had spare fullsize or spacesaver spares or runflats, but that's certainly something to be aware of for the future.

Still, I haven't had a puncture myself for (digits crossed) around 20 years.

The last tyre I changed in anger was on my daughter's Yaris, which had a spacesaver.

sdb123
1st November 2016, 11:18 AM
Yes, they work...it does take a get of being used to from a psychological perspective (not having a physical spare wheel!). Having owned many BMW's, this has been the case for a number of years, unless you go for bigger wheels, then you have run-flat tyres.

The kit is not a miracle worker, it is intended to seal (if possible) and enable re-inflation in order for you to get to a garage. This is the same principle as run-flat tyres, as in if they have a puncture or lose pressure rapidly, they are designed to get you to a garage at a safe minimum speed. I have used a tyre inflation kit twice and both times was a simple process and did the job.

All of this goes south if, of course, you have more than one puncture/deflated tyre at once...but there is no work around for that no matter what you have (spare tyre, tyre inflation kit)!

In terms of having the tyre repaired, that's all down to where the issue is on the tyre...the "goo" will make no difference to repairability.

Hope this helps,

Steve

Olybirder
1st November 2016, 11:52 AM
Thanks Steve, that is quite encouraging. When I asked about it at the dealership they told me that they are not as bad as people say, within their limitations. I suppose if she does have a puncture her best course of action would be to call Mazda Assist and see what they suggest. Roadside assistance companies are normally very good when it is an unaccompanied woman.

I would still prefer a spare wheel but I suppose the manufacturers have to reduce weight to meet those critical emission ratings. ;)

Ron

sdb123
1st November 2016, 11:56 AM
I would still prefer a spare wheel but I suppose the manufacturers have to reduce weight to meet those critical emission ratings. ;)

Haha...of course, the other cynical element is that there is a cost to replacing the inflation foam/goo if used. I'm sure the cost varies wildly dependant on the manufacturer. :rolleyes:

Wee man
1st November 2016, 12:11 PM
Ring a breakers and purchase a space saver a lot of repair shop will not repair after goo is used. If the side walls are damaged goo may not work away. You car has the space so get a space saver at a sensible price if you can.

Wee Man

drmarkf
1st November 2016, 12:16 PM
All of this goes south if, of course, you have more than one puncture/deflated tyre at once...but there is no work around for that no matter what you have (spare tyre, tyre inflation kit)!

That's the one area where runflats help, of course!

The Bridgestone Potenza RE050 runflats that used to be specified on most upper-range BMWs feel like driving on solid indiarubber, but I recently replaced all 4 of mine with the latest S001 Potenza series and they are a lot more forgiving and were actually cheaper than the old design.

sdb123
1st November 2016, 12:24 PM
That's the one area where runflats help, of course!

Absolutely...the downside though is finding a garage with appropriate stock levels of the tyre should it need replacing. I had different sized 19" tyres on my previous 3-series and it was a royal PITA to try and get the rear tyres replaced (thankfully it was a company car so in the end had a mobile van come and fit like for like - they were P-Zero's).

The Bridgestone Potenza RE050 runflats that used to be specified on most upper-range BMWs feel like driving on solid indiarubber, but I recently replaced all 4 of mine with the latest S001 Potenza series and they are a lot more forgiving and were actually cheaper than the old design.

Yes, it's a bit of a lottery as to what you tyres get given when BMW ship a new car...I've been relatively lucky with the run-flats I've had; that said, I've had some terrible ones - noisy, increased tramlining in less than perfect conditions...awful.

shenstone
1st November 2016, 12:29 PM
In my opinion

OK if you have something like a Nail in the center of the tyre tread
Totally ***** useless if you have a tear in the tyre on the edge or sidewall

I've had both types of events so a full sized spare was a key factor in my new car choice

I did use one of those kits on a motorbike once, it got me home, but cleaning up to do the repair was a mess as others have said

I agree with others. Ring the breakers or e-bay if you want peace of mind

Regards
Andy

Ian
1st November 2016, 08:43 PM
The Mazda 6 we recently acquired had no spare and a instead an electric pump and tyre inflation fluid. Happily, I found - by chance - someone local to me selling the exact same alloy wheel, with a tyre, that I needed and all for 45. Our Mazda has tyre pressure monitoring (TPMS) and dread to think how the sensor on inside the tyre would react to the emergency inflation fluid!

Ian

peak4
1st November 2016, 09:49 PM
For the motorbikes, kit car and Discovery, I've used Puncturesafe (https://www.puncturesafe.co.uk) as a deflation preventative.
Available off ebay of from bricks and mortar dealers.
Does it work? I don't know as I've not noticed any punctures, so either I've not had one, or it's self sealed it.
Certainly I've not noticed any adverse effects, though it makes it even more important to visually inspect your tyres regularly to make sure there's no screws or nails in the tread.

There are a number of other makes out there, so make sure you do your own research before you commit to any particular one.

Olybirder
1st November 2016, 10:43 PM
The Mazda 6 we recently acquired had no spare and a instead an electric pump and tyre inflation fluid. Happily, I found - by chance - someone local to me selling the exact same alloy wheel, with a tyre, that I needed and all for 45. Our Mazda has tyre pressure monitoring (TPMS) and dread to think how the sensor on inside the tyre would react to the emergency inflation fluid!

IanThat would be a nice solution. The genuine Mazda alloys which are fitted to the car are 'only' 90, which is a lot cheaper than the 400 which the space saver kit costs. Unfortunately, the tyre well is not deep enough to take a full size wheel and I don't think Lynn would appreciate having the boot floor mat bulging up on her lovely new car. We would also need to get a suitable jack and tools, although they could probably sourced from a car breakers.

Regarding the TPMS, I am not sure but I don't think it uses sensors in the wheel on the Mazda 2. I think it is something to do with the ABS sensors monitoring the revolutions of the wheels to check if one is rotating faster than the others. I could be wrong though.

Ron

DerekW
1st November 2016, 11:28 PM
Even if you do not have any punctures the "goo" has a limited shelf life so you have to periodically replaced the can of goo regardless of whether you have puncture.

Re installing temporary wheels, I call out the AA/RAC/coloured Flag service to do the heavy lifting, they will have proper jacks to lift the car and strong arms to undo and tighten up the wheel nuts. Plus they will have the local knowledge of the nearest tyre shop to go to to get the tyre fixed or replaced

raichea
2nd November 2016, 12:45 AM
I've had to use one of these kits once. The tyre was a write off because of sidewall damage...and the salt in the wound was the additional 60 to replenish the kit.

Ross the fiddler
2nd November 2016, 02:43 AM
Even if you do not have any punctures the "goo" has a limited shelf life so you have to periodically replaced the can of goo regardless of whether you have puncture.

Re installing temporary wheels, I call out the AA/RAC/coloured Flag service to do the heavy lifting, they will have proper jacks to lift the car and strong arms to undo and tighten up the wheel nuts. Plus they will have the local knowledge of the nearest tyre shop to go to to get the tyre fixed or replaced

Yeah, we have a good ad for that here with NRMA. :D
NRMA advert Roadside assist - YouTube

Ian
2nd November 2016, 07:10 AM
That would be a nice solution. The genuine Mazda alloys which are fitted to the car are 'only' 90, which is a lot cheaper than the 400 which the space saver kit costs. Unfortunately, the tyre well is not deep enough to take a full size wheel and I don't think Lynn would appreciate having the boot floor mat bulging up on her lovely new car. We would also need to get a suitable jack and tools, although they could probably sourced from a car breakers.

Regarding the TPMS, I am not sure but I don't think it uses sensors in the wheel on the Mazda 2. I think it is something to do with the ABS sensors monitoring the revolutions of the wheels to check if one is rotating faster than the others. I could be wrong though.

Ron

Yes there are indirect and direct systems. You can see that the valve stems on my 6's alloys are metal, not rubber. You also need to be careful with them as they can be damaged quite easily. There was an issue with early cars where the valves corroded and failed, allowing the tyres to deflate unexpectedly so Mazda replaced them under a safety advisory. I wouldn't be surprised if Mazda changed to an indirect solution after problems like this. It's also disappointing that they sytem simply says 'you have low pressure in one of your tyres' rather than indicating which tyre!

Ian

Petanque
2nd November 2016, 08:15 AM
My BMW repair system consists of a can of goo and a mini compressor, all a bit fiddly roadside I would think. I bought a can of Holts puncture repair for my wife's Fiat, it inserts the sealant and re inflates all at the same time, altogether simpler. It also states that it works best if you move the car so that the puncture is at the bottom of the wheel, makes sense. I have also read some sealants render the tyre un repairable after use.

AMc
2nd November 2016, 01:30 PM
Our Mini Cooper S convertible had runflats - after a puncture I was completely unable to find a fitter who would repair them so the luxury of a 4 mile drive with the pressure light on cost an arm+leg for a whole new tyre.

When the fronts needed replacing I switched for Michelin Cross Climates - which are a summer compound with superior snow grip. As both our cars have wide low profile tyres and lots of power I thought it might come in handy to be able to get the kid from school...if it snowed, which it didn't :)

However the car ride and handling were transformed - much smoother and more comfortable and no tram lining.

I picked up a can of Holt's Tyreweld for a fiver in Tesco - which as others said seals and reinflates the tyre itself.
It washes out with water leaving a repairable tyre unlike limited distance space savers or punctured runflats.
https://www.holtsauto.com/holts/products/tyreweld/
If I were the OP I'd buy a can and leave the Mazda kit alone.

Next time I'm in Halfords I'll be buying a can for my Golf (bigger wheels than a normal can can do) and I'll leave the VW space saver in the boot for the next owner to admire.

I appreciate I've never used it, but that and a recovery package from Green Flag are enough peace of mind for me and my partner.

It always amused me that the Mini convertible has a jack and brace taking up space in the tiny main boot space but there's nothing you could do with them as the dual exhaust & battery means there's no space for any kind of spare :)

Petanque
2nd November 2016, 03:59 PM
Like you I had runflats, they were terrible, like driving on solid rubber. I changed to continental's and the difference is like night and day. Also like you I have never had to use the repair kit, however, I think compared to changing a tyre roadside in the dark at my age, if it gets me home, great, I can deal with the concequences in the morning. I too have been assured that using the Holts product does not effect the repairability of the tyre.

shenstone
2nd November 2016, 05:20 PM
It always amused me that the Mini convertible has a jack and brace taking up space in the tiny main boot space but there's nothing you could do with them as the dual exhaust & battery means there's no space for any kind of spare



of course "proper" Mini's came with proper spare wheels... AND you can fit a couple of bags of shopping in with the spare wheel :D

https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-t3AaB4_WFmI/TjW8epF2g6I/AAAAAAAAAOY/tFCby6n6MYM/s1600/mini1.jpg

Progress... I think the best fix for this problem is go back to a classic! *chr

mind you then there is the rust factor :( :( :( :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

regards
Andy

Melaka
2nd November 2016, 07:06 PM
None of these things work if you have an SUV and use it off road. I've just bought a 12 reg Forester which I am told is the last of the series to have a proper spare.

The most recent problem we had was a burst tyre on the motor caravan in France just after the Brexit vote. We were two miles past the back of beyond and just getting to grips with the problem when a French mechanic stopped and offered to help. We were just looking at the rather dismal scissor jack provided with the vehicle when white van woman stopped. She had a proper trolley jack (though she looked as if she didn't need one!) and the wheel was speedily changed. President Hollande may not like Brexit but the man on the back road evidently admired us for it.

Naughty Nigel
2nd November 2016, 11:20 PM
The Mazda 6 we recently acquired had no spare and a instead an electric pump and tyre inflation fluid. Happily, I found - by chance - someone local to me selling the exact same alloy wheel, with a tyre, that I needed and all for 45. Our Mazda has tyre pressure monitoring (TPMS) and dread to think how the sensor on inside the tyre would react to the emergency inflation fluid!

Ian

Don't forget you will also need a jack, and a wheel wrench!

We bought a set of decent wheel wrenches for our cars from Halfords, (by Draper), that have reversible 17/19 mm sockets. The wrench has an extendable handle and takes standard " drive sockets so other sizes can be used if required.

On that point, make sure you get the right sized wrench, as I believe Toyota (and maybe some others) use 21 millimetre wheel nuts.

The repair kits are supposed to reduce vehicle weight, and more to the point, save the manufacturer money!

To be fair though, many drivers struggle to change a wheel, even if they can get the wheel nuts undone with the pathetic wheel wrenches provided. It can also be a dangerous operation beside a busy road. For these reasons I genuinely believe the puncture repair kits are better in many circumstances, but it would be good to be given the choice.

Ian
3rd November 2016, 08:36 AM
Don't forget you will also need a jack, and a wheel wrench!

We bought a set of decent wheel wrenches for our cars from Halfords, (by Draper), that have reversible 17/19 mm sockets. The wrench has an extendable handle and takes standard " drive sockets so other sizes can be used if required.

On that point, make sure you get the right sized wrench, as I believe Toyota (and maybe some others) use 21 millimetre wheel nuts.

The repair kits are supposed to reduce vehicle weight, and more to the point, save the manufacturer money!

To be fair though, many drivers struggle to change a wheel, even if they can get the wheel nuts undone with the pathetic wheel wrenches provided. It can also be a dangerous operation beside a busy road. For these reasons I genuinely believe the puncture repair kits are better in many circumstances, but it would be good to be given the choice.

The car came with all the tools needed for changing a wheel, just no wheel :D

Ian

Ross the fiddler
3rd November 2016, 10:36 AM
The car came with all the tools needed for changing a wheel, just no wheel :D

Ian

As long as you are more careful with the wheel than the bloke in the (NRMA) video I added. :rolleyes: :D

Naughty Nigel
3rd November 2016, 10:39 AM
The car came with all the tools needed for changing a wheel, just no wheel :D

Ian

How bizarre!

That seems to defeat the whole idea (of saving weight and money).

Ross the fiddler
3rd November 2016, 10:53 AM
How bizarre!

That seems to defeat the whole idea (of saving weight and money).

They think of the handyman that would take the wheel off to take (in his other car) to get it fixed. :p :D

Olybirder
3rd November 2016, 11:05 AM
Thanks for all the replies. I am still not sure what the best solution is. The Holts Tyre Weld looked quite intriguing when I looked at their website. However, when I checked the reviews on the Halfords site they were rather mixed with some respondents saying that the product didn't work and that some tyre fitters refused to repair the tyre. I just wish that car companies hadn't gone down this route.

Ron

AMc
3rd November 2016, 11:53 AM
If your car has space for a spacesaver then go for it but check how fast and far you can go.

IMO many tyre fitters should be wearing stetsons and spurs - with my punctured run flat I had assurance from the manufacturer that it was repairable, but no one would do it. All the fitters claimed they would have repaired the tyre if it were a standard one, but as the run flat "might" be damaged by running at reduced pressure they wouldn't attempt it. So >100 vs 15 - I wonder what the motivation was...

When I switched out the run flats Blackcircles tried to cancel the order and make me order runflats or a full set of tyres because I was only changing the fronts not the complete set "for safety"(?) this wasn't recommended.
Then the fitters rang to tell me I'd "invalidate my insurance" by fitting non-runflats. So I rang my insurer who agreed that the same size and profile on the original alloys was not a modification or safety concern.
5000 miles later I can't say the handling is "unsafe" - just a load of nonsense to try and sell me expensive RF tyres or 2 extra tyres I didn't need.

Reading the Amazon reviews for the Holts stuff before I bought there were lots of useless 5 star reviews from people saying they felt safe having it in the boot but hadn't used it. A few who had been happy with it in an emergency.
A few 1 star reviews complaining they'd bought too small a can or had a tubed tyre and a couple who'd had the thing fail when they tried to use it which did look a bit poor- might have been faulty, might have been user error who knows?

My Golf has a space saver - it's limited to a 30 mph (IIRC?) and a very short distance before it has to be completely replaced. In addition to having to replace/repair the punctured main tyre.
The mini has no spare option so it's academic.

For a few quid it seems a reasonable insurance before I call Green Flag. Plug it in and turn the knob - drive a bit. If it doesn't work I'm probably not much worse off.
My local Tesco had the up to 16" wheel can for 3.50 the other day.

I drove for years without getting a puncture - I had a couple a few years back but was able to get to a garage - thanks in part to the ABS sensor warnings that tell you the tyre pressure has dropped before it gets undriveable. The only time I actually needed a spare I was forced into a kerb and the tyre was mashed so nothing would save it. If that happened with no spare I'd just call GF.

AMc
3rd November 2016, 12:01 PM
of course "proper" Mini's came with proper spare wheels... AND you can fit a couple of bags of shopping in with the spare wheel :D

Progress... I think the best fix for this problem is go back to a classic! *chr

mind you then there is the rust factor :( :( :( :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

regards
Andy
LOL!

Our Mini has a 167bhp, 1.6l Supercharged engine - does 0-60 in 7.5 seconds and no roof at the touch of a button :D - it's 11 years old and shows no rust and hasn't (touch wood) ever left me standing by the side of the road waiting for the AA either ;) (unlike my unlovely Austin Metro 1.3l)

I love original minis and have fond memories of them from my early driving days but I couldn't go back to Leyland reliability.

The 1st generation BMW minis have a lot of the feel of the originals - the cabin layout, handling, ride and looks etc. _ was unconvinced until my partner insisted we test drive one and I was amazed. It's her car, so it was her choice but I was converted by the "S".
BMW have been progressively ruining them though - we test drove the 2nd gen and it's been softened, quietened and fattened up to the point it's just an ordinary hatchback. Faster and duller so we're keeping the one we have until the wheels fall off :) so far it's been with us 8 years!

Olybirder
3rd November 2016, 12:08 PM
Hopefully she won't have a puncture so it will not be a problem. The last 'puncture' I had was when some low life decided to get his kicks by spiking loads of tyres in our neighbourhood. He destroyed two nearly new tyres on my Leon Cupra while it was on the driveway. As it was at home I was able to find a way to get the tyres to the fitters to be replaced. It was still very inconvenient and expensive though.

When my other half had a puncture in the runflats on her Mini, she checked the handbook to see what the warning light was and switched it off. She then drove home in the usual way (more than 50 mph.) When she arrived and told me what had happened I inspected the tyres and they all looked fine. I then used my pressure gauge and found that one of them gave absolutely no reading.

She had taken out an expensive runflat insurance policy when she bought the Mini so it was replaced free of charge but it still involved a slow, one hour's drive to the Mini dealers to replace it.

Ron