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Graham_of_Rainham
3rd April 2016, 01:13 PM
Two pixels on a hard drive were having a conversation. Here’s how it went…

“What are you doing?”
“Nuthin. What are YOU doing?”
“Nuthin.”
“Been here a long time?”
“Not really, but in pixel years, yeah. About 3. You?”
“I’ve got you beat; I’ve been here 4 years. I’m the old guy.”
“Come on, now; that’s not old.”
“Maybe not in the real world, but it is for us.”
“Yeah, I feel ya. I’m only 3 and I already don’t feel great.”
“Uh-oh. What’s wrong?”
“I don’t know; I just feel like I’m coming apart a bit. “
“Tell me about it, brother. Hey…I got a question for you. Do you mind?”
“Fire away; I got nothing else going on.’
“It’s kind of personal.”
“Go ahead.”
“You ever get…printed?”
“Are you kidding? Not even close. You?”
“Nah. There was talk about doing it once, but no. Although, I knew a guy once who was printed.”
“Really? Wow.”
“Yeah, he was copied from the hard drive and put onto paper. It was freakin’ amazing.”
“Geeze…that must feel great.”
“Yeah, and I’m not even to the best part.”
“There’s more?”
“Oh yeah, there’s more-he was made into a 24×30.”
“Holy crap! That’s the BIG TIME.”
“I know. Only guy I ever knew who made it to “The Show.”
“He must have been important.”
“Yeah, but I don’t think any more important than us. I mean, you’re someone’s baby and I’m someone’s family, so I don’t think we’re exactly chopped liver.”
“Well, we’ve not been printed, so we must not be that important.”
“They don’t think we are now, but we’ll show ‘em.”
“How?”
One day they’ll realize that we were. I know they will. And then, we’ll refuse to cooperate. Or just disappear somewhere. We’ll exact our revenge.”
“Yeah, I’m with you on that.”
“And there will be nothing anybody can do about it, ‘cause it will be too late.”
“Yeah, it will. I hope, when that happens, they feel bad.”
“I guarantee they will.”
“Yeah…well, I’d better get back to doing nuthin.”
“Yeah, me, too.”
“Good talking to you.”
“Yeah, good talk.”

http://petapixel.com/2016/03/02/conversation-pixels-hard-drive/?platform=hootsuite

DerekW
3rd April 2016, 07:50 PM
Hard drives exist in one of two states:-

1 - About to die

2 - Dead

David M
3rd April 2016, 08:27 PM
You reminded me to do my weekly backup. I normally do it on Sunday morning but we went out this morning.

Ricoh
4th April 2016, 09:24 AM
It's a timely reminder to many I'm sure, including me.

As someone mentioned recently, we take far too many images of little significance. If we don't look at them periodically, do we need them? Would it matter greatly if they disappeared? Save the best, forget the rest. Less is more in many walks in life (I take the car mainly :)).

Harold Gough
4th April 2016, 10:03 AM
I don't back up very often but I alternate between two external disc drives. (One will die sooner or later).

Harold

David M
4th April 2016, 11:35 AM
I don't back up very often but I alternate between two external disc drives. (One will die sooner or later).

Harold

Store one off site also.

Bikie John
4th April 2016, 01:38 PM
It's a timely reminder to many I'm sure, including me.

As someone mentioned recently, we take far too many images of little significance. If we don't look at them periodically, do we need them? Would it matter greatly if they disappeared? Save the best, forget the rest. Less is more in many walks in life (I take the car mainly :)).

I have lots and lots of photos of very little significance - parties, days out etc. Most are just happy snaps and there are the odd few way out of focus etc. But I never get rid of them because sometimes all sorts of fascinating bits of history turn up when going through them. If I had weeded out the duff ones at the time and just kept the "best", that would be most unlikely to happen. The value of pictures is not always apparent until much later.

John

Graham_of_Rainham
4th April 2016, 01:56 PM
... The value of pictures is not always apparent until much later.
John

So true. *yes

David M
4th April 2016, 02:24 PM
I have lots and lots of photos of very little significance - parties, days out etc. Most are just happy snaps and there are the odd few way out of focus etc. But I never get rid of them because sometimes all sorts of fascinating bits of history turn up when going through them. If I had weeded out the duff ones at the time and just kept the "best", that would be most unlikely to happen. The value of pictures is not always apparent until much later.

John

When I started copying three decades worth of slides I thought there would be 100, maybe 200 at most to copy. So far I'm up to 800 copied with more to do.

pdk42
4th April 2016, 04:17 PM
I've got three disks I use as backups - one in the PC and another two removable drives. You can never be too careful! However, I live in the knowledge that in the longer term none of this technology will stay with us. I only hope I can transfer it to something more long term before I lose it. I suppose cloud storage is where it will end up, but then you're putting your images into someone else's care - which is a bit scary!

Naughty Nigel
4th April 2016, 05:02 PM
I've got three disks I use as backups - one in the PC and another two removable drives. You can never be too careful! However, I live in the knowledge that in the longer term none of this technology will stay with us. I only hope I can transfer it to something more long term before I lose it. I suppose cloud storage is where it will end up, but then you're putting your images into someone else's care - which is a bit scary!

Sold state drives (SSD's) are rapidly taking over from hard drives in personal computers. Prices are falling steadily but they are still very expensive for bulk storage.

I therefore expect hard drives to be with us for a long time yet, as they are fast, easy to interface and comparatively cheap. Competition from SSD's has also forced the hard drive manufacturers to up their game by improving capacity, speed and price per terabyte.

However, for long term storage and archival it is still difficult to beat tape. The LTO system has been going since the year 2000, and has seen capacity double every year or so since. The latest version (LTO-7) stores 12 TB of data on a cartridge that fits into the palm of your hand, and is claimed to have an archive life of at lest 30 years.

Jpeg files are almost universal at present, and I suspect will still be readable in 30 years time. However, I somehow doubt that the dozens of different raw file formats in current use will still be readable in 30 years time.

Ricoh
4th April 2016, 06:06 PM
Sold state drives (SSD's) are rapidly taking over from hard drives in personal computers. Prices are falling steadily but they are still very expensive for bulk storage.

I therefore expect hard drives to be with us for a long time yet, as they are fast, easy to interface and comparatively cheap. Competition from SSD's has also forced the hard drive manufacturers to up their game by improving capacity, speed and price per terabyte.

However, for long term storage and archival it is still difficult to beat tape. The LTO system has been going since the year 2000, and has seen capacity double every year or so since. The latest version (LTO-7) stores 12 TB of data on a cartridge that fits into the palm of your hand, and is claimed to have an archive life of at lest 30 years.

Jpeg files are almost universal at present, and I suspect will still be readable in 30 years time. However, I somehow doubt that the dozens of different raw file formats in current use will still be readable in 30 years time.
Magnetic storage is a more graceful form of failure compared to solid state. If a SSD fails, it's more or less curtains. If a hard drive goes, there is a slim chance of repair.
Magnetic tape can suffer from print through if not exercised.
DNG is probably the best for long term compatibility. Some of the propriety camera RAW files will fade away - my guess of course.

DerekW
4th April 2016, 07:36 PM
Tape was too slow for mass backups, I use three levels of spinning rust for my backups.

As new media arrives one migrates to it for cost and speed reasons.

pdk42
4th April 2016, 08:18 PM
However, for long term storage and archival it is still difficult to beat tape. The LTO system has been going since the year 2000, and has seen capacity double every year or so since. The latest version (LTO-7) stores 12 TB of data on a cartridge that fits into the palm of your hand, and is claimed to have an archive life of at lest 30 years.


Is it April 1st? Tape? Sorry Nigel, but tape is the last thing I'd use. I'd rather use punched cards! I can't remember the last time I successfully restored anything from tape. And I can cite at least a dozen formats that have come and gone in my time in IT!

Naughty Nigel
4th April 2016, 09:12 PM
Is it April 1st? Tape? Sorry Nigel, but tape is the last thing I'd use. I'd rather use punched cards! I can't remember the last time I successfully restored anything from tape. And I can cite at least a dozen formats that have come and gone in my time in IT!

Tape was too slow for mass backups, I use three levels of spinning rust for my backups.

As new media arrives one migrates to it for cost and speed reasons.


I disagree. Later versions of LTO are significantly faster than any mechanical hard drive, are much cheaper per terabyte, and have a lower error rate.

LTO-7 for example has a native read/write speed of 300 megabyte per second, or double that figure for compressed data. A mechanical hard drive will only achieve around 150 megabytes per second sustained speed.

A single LTO-6 tape will hold 6 TB of data, only costs about £25 and is smaller than a 3.5" hard drive.

The LTO system has been an industry standard for quite a few years now and continues to be developed so I don't see why you dislike it so much?

LTO media is extremely reliable and durable. Any problems with restores are usually down to the backup software, some of which can be very flaky, irrespective of the medium used.

DerekW
4th April 2016, 10:08 PM
My problem with tape is the lack of direct access to data. If the file you need is at the end of the tape you have to go to the end. I do all my back ups to clones of the master drives, the files that are new or have changed are updated to the back up drive so a full back up is only 20 minutes per drive unless there is a mass of new data to copy across.

The other main advantage of clone backups is that I always have a ready to go drive to boot from or use. So enabling me to get online and get a replacement drive on order.

Naughty Nigel
5th April 2016, 07:50 AM
My problem with tape is the lack of direct access to data. If the file you need is at the end of the tape you have to go to the end. I do all my back ups to clones of the master drives, the files that are new or have changed are updated to the back up drive so a full back up is only 20 minutes per drive unless there is a mass of new data to copy across.

The other main advantage of clone backups is that I always have a ready to go drive to boot from or use. So enabling me to get online and get a replacement drive on order.

Speed of access to files on tape is an issue, although it is quicker with LTO than most other types. Good backup software also helps. I also like the fact that even if the worst should happen that I can buy an LTO drive from any competent IT supplier and get going again from my off-site copies.

I have used Retrospect backup software for at least ten years now, and whilst it isn't perhaps the most intuitive programme it does work well, and I have never lost a file yet.

(I currently have in excess of 20 TB of data archived to LTO WORM tapes that I need to dig into every now and again. I can always find my copies, but clients rarely can! :) )

I am sure you know that from LTO-5 onwards it is possible to store raw data on LTO tapes, but I have never found a need for this facility.

I like your idea of disk clones. I create a system disk image from each machine when everything is successfully installed, so I can easily get back up and running if things go wrong.

I never use the full size of my system hard drives (they are usually partitioned to a maximum of 250 GB), and I don't keep important or irreplaceable data on the system drive, so it is easy to restore a drive image to a new or temporary drive.

DerekW
5th April 2016, 09:24 AM
My drive organisation is perverse - I have 5 equivalent online spindles and two connected by USB3 (so reasonably fast and bootable)

The System is on a PCI Flash drive
Key database data eg Lightroom and Aperture databases are on a SSD along with a partition that is a copy of the PCI Flash drive (so is bootable)
First Spinning rust drive has the bog standard home computer trivia eg word processing, spreadsheets, music.
Second spinning rust drive has all the image files going back to 2000 when I first obtained a digital camera, plus the exported image files from Aperture and Lightroom.

Third Spinning Rust drive is big enough to hold a full back up of the aforementioned drives updated each evening from about 7pm using a cloning process.

First external drive is a full copy of the system again updated by a clone process every evening.

Second external drive is normally kept in the shed in the garden and connected to the computer once a week to be brought up to date by the clone process. If I have a lot of new images then it gets updated after the new images have been imported. The whole copying / cloning process takes less than 90 minutes and runs automatically.

I can use the machine at the same time however taking care to minimise updates to the drive being cloned.

I will be updating the two external drives to 4TB drives in the near future, I expect that will see me out.