PDA

View Full Version : Do as I say... 'Political'


Wally
30th March 2016, 07:59 AM
Not as I do!

A Clear & Present Danger... As more than 30,000 people support call to ban David Cameron from returning to UK from holiday.

http://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/uknews/more-than-30000-people-support-call-to-ban-david-cameron-from-returning-to-uk-from-holiday/ar-BBr5oUM?li=BBoPOOl&ocid=mailsignoutmd


*note Where do I sign up??? *yes

raymondo
30th March 2016, 08:40 AM
Hi Wally, this news made me smile,whilst having my morning coffee,if only we could!!!! and send a few more to join him,:D

Otto
30th March 2016, 08:42 AM
https://www.change.org/p/rt-hon-theresa-may-mp-ban-david-cameron-from-re-entering-the-uk

:)

Zuiko
30th March 2016, 09:28 AM
Ha ha, I've just this very moment signed the petition before coming here. This is the comment I made in support of the petition:-

"Okay, yes, why not. Obviously it's a bit tongue-in-cheek and never going to happen, but it does give us the opportunity to declare our utter dislike and rejection of this man and his policies. He must rank as the worst PM in living memory (and my mother who is 88 endorses this), worse even than Tony of the Blair Rich Project."

It made my day! :D

Wee man
30th March 2016, 10:16 AM
No point the Spanish would let him in and the French would put him on a truck and send him back!

Zuiko
30th March 2016, 10:27 AM
No point the Spanish would let him in and the French would put him on a truck and send him back!

No wonder he wants us to remain in the EU. :D

Grumpy Hec
30th March 2016, 10:41 AM
Signed as well !!

Ross the fiddler
30th March 2016, 11:03 AM
Ha ha, I've just this very moment signed the petition before coming here. This is the comment I made in support of the petition:-

"Okay, yes, why not. Obviously it's a bit tongue-in-cheek and never going to happen, but it does give us the opportunity to declare our utter dislike and rejection of this man and his policies. He must rank as the worst PM in living memory (and my mother who is 88 endorses this), worse even than Tony of the Blair Rich Project."

It made my day! :D

What about the "Iron Lady"? :rolleyes:

Grumpy Hec
30th March 2016, 12:14 PM
What about the "Iron Lady"? :rolleyes:
Whilst I disliked, indeed despised, that individual with a passion I could at least have some respect for some of her abilities and statesmanship. Cameron posses little or none of those qualities and I am therefore left with a total mistrust in both his ability and, perhaps even worse, his motives for most of his actions and policies.

Hec

Wally
30th March 2016, 12:57 PM
The major problem I have with politicians is, that even if thrown out of office they have a golden handshake to help them on their way. Worse still, is that even as a total waste of space as a PM, they have the PM's wage packet for life.

After secret talks with GB, call me 'Dave' has already intimated, that once out of office, he too will stand as an MP. Given his ongoing record of failing to make good at almost every promise he made, I reckon the proverbial snowball in hell has a better chance of success.

Naughty Nigel
30th March 2016, 02:16 PM
As long as he takes the other 649 with him.

Then if we vote to leave the EU in June the arrangement can be made permanent. :)

To be fair he probably booked his air tickets with Ryanair or Thompson months ago, so we couldn't expect him to cancel his foreign holiday now. :D

Wally
31st March 2016, 04:06 PM
Just received an email update that indicates more people have now voted to keep 'Just call me Dave' out than voted to get the toe-rag into office. Sad, isn't it, that what has now quite possibly become a majority vote, will be dismissed out of hand. Still, it's nice to know that in a democacy, the minority vote always takes precedence.

Harold Gough
31st March 2016, 05:38 PM
He must rank as the worst PM in living memory (and my mother who is 88 endorses this), worse even than Tony of the Blair Rich Project."

That's unfair to Gordon Brown!

Harold

Naughty Nigel
31st March 2016, 05:53 PM
He must rank as the worst PM in living memory (and my mother who is 88 endorses this), worse even than Tony of the Blair Rich Project."[/COLOR]

I'm not sure about that John. There is stiff competition for that particular accolade. *yes

Other than Gordon Brown, who I would put well ahead of DC in this poll, we have had 'Darlin' Harold Wilson, 'Honest Jim' Callaghan and Ted Heath.

Contrary to popular misconception 'Darlin Harold' could not walk on water, and indeed couldn't even swim.

Back in the days when Labour MP's mercilessly ribbed Ted Heath about his yachting exploits, 'Darlin Harold' fell into the sea whilst trying to board his private motor yacht in the Scilly Isles, but was rescued from drowning by a public schoolboy. :D

I gather his Head Teacher was not best pleased. ;)

Wally
31st March 2016, 06:29 PM
...

'Darlin Harold' fell into the sea whilst trying to board his private motor yacht in the Scilly Isles, but was rescued from drowning by a public schoolboy. :D

I gather his Head Teacher was not best pleased. ;)

Bloody do-gooder's. The depth to which some people will stoop for a mere 15' of fame never fails to amaze me. I hope his mother gave him a damn good thrashing and taught him to better his ways. *yes

Zuiko
31st March 2016, 11:15 PM
I'm not sure about that John. There is stiff competition for that particular accolade. *yes

Other than Gordon Brown, who I would put well ahead of DC in this poll, we have had 'Darlin' Harold Wilson, 'Honest Jim' Callaghan and Ted Heath.

Contrary to popular misconception 'Darlin Harold' could not walk on water, and indeed couldn't even swim.

Back in the days when Labour MP's mercilessly ribbed Ted Heath about his yachting exploits, 'Darlin Harold' fell into the sea whilst trying to board his private motor yacht in the Scilly Isles, but was rescued from drowning by a public schoolboy. :D

I gather his Head Teacher was not best pleased. ;)

Ha ha, Nigel, I suspect you and I might disagree about the exact order of ranking for this honour! Let's just be thankful we don't have Donald Trump on this side of the pond! *chr

Zuiko
31st March 2016, 11:47 PM
Going off topic, but on purpose so as not to have too many political threads running at the same time, does anyone else find it ironic that in the same week that the highest Trade Gap since records began is announced it seems there is a very real danger that we will completely lose our steel industry, condemning us to import all our steel for evermore?

Does the Trade Gap even matter anymore? Back in the 70's the monthly figure was headline news, always gravely received by the experts who expressed doom and gloom if the trend wasn't reversed. But now the plague and pestilence predictions are all centred around the National Debt and the Budget Deficit, with the poor old Trade Gap rarely getting a mention. So I wonder, does the debt really matter - or is it just convenient for certain politicians with other agendas to make us believe it does?

Historically, our debt as a percentage of GDP has been much larger than it is today, usually after a war. Indeed, it also made the fringe news this week that Germany has finally paid off the debt it accumulated during the First World War. Presumably they are still paying for WW2. Seems to me that if we really should be worried about levels of debt, the best way to control it is not to have wars.

wornish
1st April 2016, 07:19 AM
Going off topic, but on purpose so as not to have too many political threads running at the same time, does anyone else find it ironic that in the same week that the highest Trade Gap since records began is announced it seems there is a very real danger that we will completely lose our steel industry, condemning us to import all our steel for evermore?


..........



Read todays comments from John Redwood here:
http://johnredwoodsdiary.com

Naughty Nigel
1st April 2016, 07:57 AM
Bloody do-gooder's. The depth to which some people will stoop for a mere 15' of fame never fails to amaze me. I hope his mother gave him a damn good thrashing and taught him to better his ways. *yes

I remember my Father bringing home a copy of the (old) London Evening Standard, which gleefully carried a full account of 'Darlin Harold's' marine mishap on its front page, and also contained some hilarious quotes that were purported to have been made.

Inevitably there were comments about Wilson's inability to walk on water, but my favourite was purported to have come from the lad's Head Teacher, who furiously said "He did what?"! :D

I only wish we had kept a copy of the paper, but I suspect it was used to light the fire in the Drawing Room. ;)

Naughty Nigel
1st April 2016, 01:38 PM
Going off topic, but on purpose so as not to have too many political threads running at the same time, does anyone else find it ironic that in the same week that the highest Trade Gap since records began is announced it seems there is a very real danger that we will completely lose our steel industry, condemning us to import all our steel for evermore?

Does the Trade Gap even matter anymore? Back in the 70's the monthly figure was headline news, always gravely received by the experts who expressed doom and gloom if the trend wasn't reversed. But now the plague and pestilence predictions are all centred around the National Debt and the Budget Deficit, with the poor old Trade Gap rarely getting a mention. So I wonder, does the debt really matter - or is it just convenient for certain politicians with other agendas to make us believe it does?

Historically, our debt as a percentage of GDP has been much larger than it is today, usually after a war. Indeed, it also made the fringe news this week that Germany has finally paid off the debt it accumulated during the First World War. Presumably they are still paying for WW2. Seems to me that if we really should be worried about levels of debt, the best way to control it is not to have wars.

I cannot disagree with your last point John, although defence is one of our biggest industries in the UK, employing many tens of thousands of people. A double edged sword as always.

I believe the trade gap does still matter. I don't pretend to understand the full implications of the trade deficit, but it does represent a very real debt that we owe to foreign governments, banks and investors. As a result it seems that these organisations effectively own, or have control many of our assets, or are able to buy them more easily.

John Redwood's comments on this matter are particularly interesting, even if they are very obviously slanted towards the UK's exit from the EU.

Read todays comments from John Redwood here:
http://johnredwoodsdiary.com

The situation regarding the British Steel industry is dire, as steel is an essential raw material in both manufacturing and infrastructure. However, we have been collectively digging this particular hole for a long time now, looking as always at short term gains and headline figures rather than the long term costs and implications of importing everything that we buy.

The bean counters may think they are being smart by outsourcing goods and raw materials from the far east, saving money and sacrificing jobs in the process, but we have effectively handed control of our country and manufacturing industries to the far east.

The environmental costs of shipping goods form the far east must be immense, but the low unit costs look good on the bean counters' spreadsheets.

I believe the retail industry has a lot to answer for, but they will say they are fighting to stay in business. However, if we are in the least bit interested in the environment I would seriously question the tactic of propping shop doors wide open 52 weeks of the year - just in case shoppers think the shop is closed. :confused:

Matalan and Primark do this (amongst others), but Harrods and (as a rule) M&S don't What does that say?

However, we must not forget the role of our own governments and trade unions in the process of shipping production (and jobs) overseas.

In many cases it has been convenient to move jobs to countries where not only are wages lower, but health and safety legislation is less onerous or non existent, and working practices are less restrictive. Then there are environmental tariffs on energy consumption, which have hit manufacturing industries hard, but were meant to make us a cleaner nation.

I don't think we can blame any single individual or organisation, (although Maggie had a lot to answer for), but more the result of brainless short-termism and the laws of unintended consequences.

I just wonder whether Tata's other industries in the UK, (i.e. Jaguar Land Rover) buy their steel from Tata's own steel mills, or whether they too import cheap steel from abroad?

Even that will seen be irrelevant as most of JLR's new models are predominantly built from aluminium, which I suspect is also imported following the closure of the Alcan smelter in Northumberland a few years ago.

Wally
1st April 2016, 03:43 PM
I wonder if we have the economic equation right? Yesterday's news 31/3, spelled it out that our nation's current bank account is in its worst condition since 1948. All due, apparently, to the fact that foreign investors are investing in Britain, whilst Britain is investing in foreign businesses. As our economy is presently rising faster than the others, they see higher returns on their investments whilst we see little or no returns on our foreign investments? This all results in a loss – loss for us and a win – win for them.

When there has been mention of Osborne's use of Smoke and Mirrors it would seem it was much nearer the truth than we were led to believe.

Probably down to the fact he has tunnel vision and a delusion well in excess of his abilities. If you prefer facts to fiction... this link may be worth a look-see?

Three centuries of data debunks Osborne’s economic theories (http://www.newstatesman.com/politics/economy/2016/03/three-centuries-data-debunks-osborne-s-economic-theories)

Naughty Nigel
1st April 2016, 04:27 PM
I wonder if we have the economic equation right?

I don't think we have had the economic equation right for a long time.

Our whole economy seems to rely upon year-on-year growth, and this quarter's results, which in the long term just isn't sustainable.

I also fail to understand why our investors are investing in foreign businesses whilst they refuse to invest here? Maybe they think foreign investments are fail safe, but then we have heard that before.

Imageryone
1st April 2016, 05:20 PM
I don't think we have had the economic equation right for a long time.

Our whole economy seems to rely upon year-on-year growth, and this quarter's results, which in the long term just isn't sustainable.

I also fail to understand why our investors are investing in foreign businesses whilst they refuse to invest here? Maybe they think foreign investments are fail safe, but then we have heard that before.

They will not invest here because they would have to pay all taxes, and God forbid they would help this country, massive profit is their soul aim. The only reason for even staying in the country to most of them is the " Honours List ".