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pandora
8th March 2016, 11:14 AM
I created a folder on my desktop that wont allow me to delete it. (Windows7)

"You need permission to perform this action
You require permission from the computer's administrator to make changes to this folder"

'I AM THE XXXXDY ADMINISTRATOR STUPID ! ! !' *livid

I've tried shouting at it, threatening it with the meat tenderizer to no avail. *smash

Please - Can anyone tell me how to kill it dead?

Jim Ford
8th March 2016, 11:24 AM
Use the meat tenderiser - with extreme prejudice!

(Sorry, but I try to have as little do do with Windoze as possible, for just that reason and many others!)

Jim

Naughty Nigel
8th March 2016, 11:28 AM
You need to provide Administrator privileges to do this.

I no longer have any Windows 7 machines, but from memory there are two ways of doing this.

The first is to log in as Administrator, which allows you to do pretty much everything.

The second is to right-click on the app and select "Run as Administrator", but I'm not sure that this works in Explorer.

Usually Explorer will tell you that it needs Administrator Rights to perform an action, you click on OK and it gets on with it.

Another way around this is to start the machine in Safe Mode, as very often folders cannot be deleted or renamed if the OS thinks they are being used.

I don't know what you have called your folder but I have heard that Windows protects certain file and folder names wherever they are located as it thinks they are part of the OS.

Harold Gough
8th March 2016, 11:31 AM
See if you can rename it then try again. All you need to do is to add one letter to the name.

Harold

Wally
8th March 2016, 11:34 AM
More than likely, the file might be 'write protected'. You need to select the file -> file name - once opened, right click -> to select properties -> then select security.

At this point you need to select edit... you should now be able to change the file attributes.

Hope this helps?

pandora
8th March 2016, 11:37 AM
Thanks Jim and Nigel.

I am the original dummy when it comes to messing with computers.
"Run as administrator" doesn't work when I click on folder and I don't understand "safe mode" protocols. If Ross is listening he might be able to walk me thru it on the phone.
Jim, yours sounds the quickest way to gain compliance

pandora
8th March 2016, 11:42 AM
More than likely, the file might be 'write protected'. You need to select the file -> file name - once opened, right click -> to select properties -> then select security.

At this point you need to select edit... you should now be able to change the file attributes.

Hope this helps?

Thanks Wally, I followed your procedure to the letter but "Access denied", I just can't do anything with the folder which I think is empty.

pandora
8th March 2016, 11:44 AM
Time for bed. I guess that folder isn't doing any harm but it bugs me being there. Goodnight all, and thank you. *chr

Harold Gough
8th March 2016, 11:58 AM
I did something a few months ago, which I think involved administrator access via regedit of suchlike but be very careful with altering the registry.

Try a Google search for administrator access for your version of Windows.

Harold

AMc
8th March 2016, 12:17 PM
You'll need to update the security settings for the folder. I had to do this recently to delete an "old" version of windows left behind when I added an SSD as the operating system drive and use the main drive as storage.
It can be a pain but it is possible.

This post from this thread coincides with what I remember having to do.
"you need to take ownership of the folder that you want to delete.. right click on the folder>properties> then click the "security" tab> click on "advanced" near the bottom> click on the "owner" tab> then click"edit"... you will now see who owns the folder... > click on the administrator account that you are using and want to use for full control.. and remember to highlight the "Replace Owner on Subcontainers and objects" box>click "apply"> click "ok"> and a pop up asks if you want to replace the permissions folder with a new permissions folder containing you full control.. click yes.... to be honest I just did all this to my whole drive.. just to be certain.. :)..... you may have to turn off "inheriting permissions".. but that is a whole other story "

https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/windows/en-US/d9eb638f-ba60-47ab-9c16-cb1b5bd04eb5/youll-need-to-provide-administrator-permission-to-delete-this-folder?forum=w7itprogeneral

pandora
8th March 2016, 07:22 PM
You'll need to update the security settings for the folder. I had to do this recently to delete an "old" version of windows left behind when I added an SSD as the operating system drive and use the main drive as storage.
It can be a pain but it is possible.

This post from this thread coincides with what I remember having to do.
"you need to take ownership of the folder that you want to delete.. right click on the folder>properties> then click the "security" tab> click on "advanced" near the bottom> click on the "owner" tab> then click"edit"... you will now see who owns the folder... > click on the administrator account that you are using and want to use for full control.. and remember to highlight the "Replace Owner on Subcontainers and objects" box>click "apply"> click "ok"> and a pop up asks if you want to replace the permissions folder with a new permissions folder containing you full control.. click yes.... to be honest I just did all this to my whole drive.. just to be certain.. :)..... you may have to turn off "inheriting permissions".. but that is a whole other story "

https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/windows/en-US/d9eb638f-ba60-47ab-9c16-cb1b5bd04eb5/youll-need-to-provide-administrator-permission-to-delete-this-folder?forum=w7itprogeneral


Good morning all!

AMc - thanks for that procedure; I had already taken those steps which led to a dead end. It said that I own the folder but denied access to changes.

However, when I booted up this morning, the folder had vanished!

I knew it was Windows7, not me that is MAD!

Wee man
8th March 2016, 07:29 PM
Mark glad to have helped, I flew down during your night and sorted it. Did not want to wake you. By the way you have two brushes which need cleaning you must have left them down and forgotten them had no time or I would have sorted them for you🤔

Glad all is well with your PC the insides and workings are a complete mystery to me.

Jim Ford
8th March 2016, 07:59 PM
Extraordinary!

Linux has the reputation for being technical, difficult and convoluted, but Windows is in a different league altogether! My heart sinks whenever I fire up my W10 desktop.

What fevered brain dreamt up the gaggingly obfuscated 'Registry'?!

Jim

OM USer
8th March 2016, 08:54 PM
... I had already taken those steps which led to a dead end. It said that I own the folder but denied access to changes

removing a file or directory entry requires write access to the containing folder as all you are doing is removing an entry in the the file that is the containing directory rather than actually removing the file/directory itself.

Can you run the command prompt (cmd.exe) as an administrator and use the old fashioned "rmdir" command? Right click on the desktop and create a shortcut to "cmd.exe", then right click on the shortcut and "run as administrator".

Windows 8 was horrible in this respect. I wanted to change the startup picture but all the files/folders are owned by a user that you can not login as. I had to change ownerhip down the entire chain before I could change the picture. In hindsight I should have booted off my linux USB stick.

Barr1e
8th March 2016, 09:24 PM
Mark glad to have helped, I flew down during your night and sorted it. Did not want to wake you. By the way you have two brushes which need cleaning you must have left them down and forgotten them had no time or I would have sorted them for you��

Glad all is well with your PC the insides and workings are a complete mystery to me.

Well I knew this site was full of people with all kinds of knowledge and routes to cure almost any problem, but this one earns the biscuit. *upsided

Well done that man. (Have you got back yet.)

Regards. Barr1e

Naughty Nigel
8th March 2016, 09:24 PM
As a matter of principle I never, ever keep anything on C:/ drive, and wherever possible use two or more separate disks so that the operating system (OS) and my files are kept entirely separate.

This is impossible on a laptop where there is only space for one physical disk, but I still create a partition in the hard drive/SSD so that I can keep my files a safe distance away from the OS, and vice versa. This method also avoids some of the 'permissions' problems that often crop up on system drives.

There are settings in Windows where you can easily relocate My Documents, Pictures, Videos and so forth onto another drive. Once relocated the actual file locations are invisible to the user if you click on the usual library links.

If everything goes pear shaped you can safely reformat the system drive without losing your own files, although beware if using the system builders disks on a laptop as these usually wipe everything on the system disk.

Hard disks are cheap enough these days, and this is a good way of helping to protect both your own data and your computer's OS.

Naughty Nigel
8th March 2016, 09:44 PM
Extraordinary!

Linux has the reputation for being technical, difficult and convoluted, but Windows is in a different league altogether! My heart sinks whenever I fire up my W10 desktop.

What fevered brain dreamt up the gaggingly obfuscated 'Registry'?!

Jim

There must be some logic to it, but I too have never understood why it has to be so obfuscated.

Maybe it has something to do with the sheer number of possible hardware and software permutations that Windows machines must work with; which I guess is where the Apple Mac system has the advantage, as it has comparatively few such permutations to be compatible with.

pandora
9th March 2016, 07:39 AM
Mark glad to have helped, I flew down during your night and sorted it. Did not want to wake you. By the way you have two brushes which need cleaning you must have left them down and forgotten them had no time or I would have sorted them for you��

Glad all is well with your PC the insides and workings are a complete mystery to me.

Thanks Ed, much obliged for sorting my PC, but don't know of any brushes left unclean - are you sure you weren't on the Guinness before you left, that would explain all. *chr

Otto
9th March 2016, 08:46 AM
It all adds weight to my opinion that Windows is now a hugely over-complex OS for a home computer. Up to 3.11 it was fairly easy to maintain but ever since Windows 95 it's been a mess. In my humble opinion :). Glad you got it sorted in the end, anyway.

pandora
9th March 2016, 09:14 AM
Thanks Otto (Richard). If I live longer than this Windows7 laptop then I'll be switching to Apple.

Windows O/S's have become progressively worse with each new launch since Windows XP.

It happened because the design of each new platform was entrusted to young "wiz kids".

Young "wiz kids" hate anything simple because it's "uncool", they'll tell you.

If it's diabolically complex and incomprehensible to anyone with an IQ above 100, then, "hey man, that's KOOOL!"

IDIOTS ! ! ! *super

Harold Gough
9th March 2016, 09:20 AM
It all adds weight to my opinion that Windows is now a hugely over-complex OS for a home computer.

That goes for MS software, such as Word, which does all that any professional office worker might ever want to do and more.

Harold

pandora
9th March 2016, 09:40 AM
Well I knew this site was full of people with all kinds of knowledge and routes to cure almost any problem, but this one earns the biscuit. *upsided

Well done that man. (Have you got back yet.)

Regards. Barr1e

You've probably left the conversation by now, Barrie, but OMG, this thread has taken on a life of its own. :rolleyes:

I feel like Mickey Mouse as the Sorcerer's apprentice in Walt Disney's Fantasia who once having started something became overwhelmed by it...

If you saw the movie you'll know what I mean.

Naughty Nigel
9th March 2016, 01:55 PM
That goes for MS software, such as Word, which does all that any professional office worker might ever want to do and more.

Harold

I don't know if they still make it but MS used to offer a cut price package called MS Works, which was fine for basic home use but didn't do very much.

Hence nobody really liked it and we all bought Word and Excel instead. :)

As for the cool/uncool argument, those under the age of 23 (i.e. in education) seem to regard Apple computers as super cool, but they don't live in the real world and don't have to run accounts, industrial applications and other boring programmes that are not supported by the Apple OS but are nevertheless essential to pay the bills! *yes

I should add that equipping an office with Apple computers at double the cost of Windows PC's really doesn't make much sense, especially when Apple computers won't run many business critical apps.

Jim Ford
9th March 2016, 04:05 PM
That goes for MS software, such as Word, which does all that any professional office worker might ever want to do and more.

Wordstar, Supercalc 2 and DBase 2 on C/PM does all that's needed!

Jim

DerekW
9th March 2016, 08:46 PM
Many decades ago I was involved in the development of a "Works" product, as I touted it around the company there as lots of criticism about it only being a subset of a fully specced word processing product. As a rebuttal I would quote from a Microsoft study that claimed a very large percentage of word processing documents were less than 10 pages long. Actually the product was well liked - I kept on using it for about 10 years. I also got a lot of travel out of it as well. So not all bad.

So sadly for the majority of users they have an over functioned word processing application that occupies more disc space and is more like to harbour problems on their computers.

Wally
9th March 2016, 09:48 PM
I've recently ditched MS Office as for some reason the monthly GDBA Minutes refused to open. Probably due to it being MS 2003 edition and not compatible with the latest 'must have office suite. I'm now using a freebie full Office sofware suite - a choice of two - and apart from a very slight variation on the theme, seems to be working well with original MS docs, PDF files etc., and, the printer has thrown up no issues.

Price wise, it's a steal. ;-)

Naughty Nigel
9th March 2016, 09:53 PM
I've recently ditched MS Office as for some reason the monthly GDBA Minutes refused to open. Probably due to it being MS 2003 edition and not compatible with the latest 'must have office suite. I'm now using a freebie full Office sofware suite - a choice of two - and apart from a very slight variation on the theme, seems to be working well with original MS docs, PDF files etc., and, the printer has thrown up no issues.

Price wise, it's a steal. ;-)

Older versions of MS Word are supposed to pose a security risk, but you can easily override this setting.

Wally
9th March 2016, 10:05 PM
Older versions of MS Word are supposed to pose a security risk, but you can easily override this setting.

I'm by far a bigger security risk than the even the most elderly MS Office or their OS, but then, I have an excuse... I'm much older than either by quite a stretch.

The more complicated things become, the easier they are to break or breach. *yes

Jim Ford
9th March 2016, 10:18 PM
When I was working I did all my letter writing and other documents on Emacs and ran them through LaTex to produce a DVI document for printing.

I tend to use Abiword now.

If I were to only be allowed one program I could use, it would be Emacs - hand down, no competition! It's still an astonishingly versatile program and a towering landmark in the history of computer software.

Jim

OM USer
10th March 2016, 12:37 PM
I tried to open word document the other day and got this message:

"You are attempting to open a file that was created in an earlier version of Microsoft Office. This file type is blocked from opening in this version by your registry policy setting.
This error occurs if you try to open a Microsoft Office document and the file type for that document has been blocked by a registry policy setting. To help secure your computer, Microsoft or the administrator of this computer implemented a registry policy setting that prevents opening this type of file.
To open documents with this file type, disable the registry policy setting. For more information, see Microsoft Knowledge Base article 922850"

It was an old document (last edited 1997) but that is no excuse. The root cause appears to be:

"Microsoft ended support for Office 2003 on April 8, 2014. This change has affected your software updates and security options"

Why can't they just add a dialog box "do you trust this document?". I don't mind hacking the registry but I tend to forget I've hacked it and don't always remember to undo the changes.

As it happens I had the foresight to save a text only version of the document.

Ross the fiddler
10th March 2016, 01:22 PM
Good morning all!

AMc - thanks for that procedure; I had already taken those steps which led to a dead end. It said that I own the folder but denied access to changes.

However, when I booted up this morning, the folder had vanished!

I knew it was Windows7, not me that is MAD!

I'm glad it's sorted because I wasn't going to be any better at helping, however sometimes I can delete items & they appear to be still there. This is when doing an [F5] or [Control] [F5] can refresh the display, showing the real files & folders, not phantom ones (that may have been deleted).

pandora
11th March 2016, 10:30 AM
Thanks anyway Ross, and sorry for the late reply mate. *chr.