PDA

View Full Version : Suprmarket Layout Mentality


Harold Gough
7th March 2016, 09:20 AM
I mostly shop at Tesco.

Some New Age, crystal-gazer on the staff seems to now be shifting stuff around.

My wife likes the tins of mixed beans called mixed bean salad. Last time she wanted some it took me ages to find them, They were with other tinned, exotic beans several aisles away.

Upon enquiring of the customers services, I was told that they were with "other pulses". I pointed out that baked beans were not.

On a more recent visit, tinned baked beans, which used to be with all the other "Canned" foods had been moved to the pulses area. Me and my big mouth!

So far, a thread of logic... However, on the most recent visits, the tinned tomatoes have followed the baked beans.

Until recently, the tinned fruit was with custard, etc. in the desserts aisle. Not anymore, they are in the home baking aisle.

OK, having (maybe, located the items you wanted) an almost lost the will to live*, you pay at the till.

As you push your trolley past the backs of the tills, on your way to the exit, you pass a display of carpet cleaning materials...:rolleyes:

* If my pulse should stop, you know the one place not to find me!

Harold

Graham_of_Rainham
7th March 2016, 09:37 AM
My biggest gripe about all supermarkets is that you can easily look online to find the location of the stores but there's no "app" to locate what you want once you are inside the place.

Museums, zoos, amusement parks, etc., all have "guides" but not supermarkets, they want you wandering around in the hope you will pick up something if only out of sheer frustration. :(

DerekW
7th March 2016, 09:51 AM
they want you to discover and buy new to you stuff as you wander around the store.

The shops are not there for your benefit they are there to maximise the amount sold.

If you want to do quick product selection then buy online and have the goods delivered.

Otto
7th March 2016, 10:06 AM
My nearest big supermarket is twenty miles away. I know where everything is in our two local independent grocers who are in many cases price competitive with the big stores so I see no reason to bother with Tesco et al. I can nip up to the Spar and get what I want in not much more time than it takes to find what I want and walk from the aisle to the checkout in Tesco :). These days I find the sheer size and amount of product choice in the big supermarkets bewildering!

Harold Gough
7th March 2016, 10:09 AM
they want you to discover and buy new to you stuff as you wander around the store.

The shops are not there for your benefit they are there to maximise the amount sold.

If you want to do quick product selection then buy online and have the goods delivered.

I mostly just leave early when I can't find what I want.

I will never order online. That maximises the price you pay (postcode pricing too) and disrupts your home life. I have recently heard (family) of some ridiculous substitutions made for ordered products. I have also seen the damage done to parked private vehicles by the huge delivery vans in narrow residential streets, so I will in no way support the service.

Currently waiting in for a third day (far from the first time) for an Ebay delivery does nothing to improve my opinion.

Harold

Imageryone
7th March 2016, 11:32 AM
Currently waiting in for a third day (far from the first time) for an Ebay delivery does nothing to improve my opinion.

Harold[/QUOTE]

Report the carrier to the seller and E-bay, I think you can get them put on a list of " Not REcommended " carriers. If that doesn't work, start giving very low points for delivery, people will soon stop using them if it affects their standing on E-Bay.

Naughty Nigel
7th March 2016, 11:43 AM
Its not just supermarkets.

We went to Ikea on Saturday to buy a new office chair. :(

I like a shop that I can walk in to, quickly find what I want, pay and leave. Job done.

I knew what I wanted at Ikea but you have no choice but to follow a mile-long circuitous route through bedrooms, kitchens, bathrooms, and goodness knows what else.

Having located the part number of the chair we wanted we then had to go into a warehouse where the products are kept.

Ikea will deliver, but their delivery prices are steep, which is probably because they want you to spend all afternoon in their wretched shop spending money on things you never knew you needed.. :mad:

OM USer
7th March 2016, 12:44 PM
I tried to buy some (non food) items at Sainsburys the other week. Clicked what I wanted on the website, put in my postcode, and it said the items were not available. What it really meant were that the items were not available at the closest store to my postcode. What it would not tell me was which was my closest store at which the items were available. When I put in a different postcode they were magically available, so I had them delivered to a cousin who lives not far away. If I hadn't been so lucky then how many postcodes would I have had to try in a 20 mile radius to find out which store or delivery outlet would have them in stock?

Naughty Nigel
7th March 2016, 01:59 PM
I think we should all remind ourselves that supermarkets spend millions studying consumer psychology and applying this knowledge to the layout of their stores.

So, for example, the first department you will find in any supermarket is fresh fruit and veg, so that we feel good about ourselves before we pick up all of the sweet, sugary, fatty, artery clogging stuff!

Likewise, products they most want us to buy will be positioned at eye level, whilst sweets, treats and magazines are located in the till area to catch the attention of young children, who will then pester their parents to buy them.

The one and only reason for this is to part us with money that we didn't plan to spend, and possibly cannot afford.

Just remember this whenever you go shopping and you will save a fortune! *yes

MargaretR
7th March 2016, 02:34 PM
Just remember this whenever you go shopping and you will save a fortune! *yes

I make a list of what I need, and only buy what's on it. Of course, finding it in store is then the problem, as Harold says.

And no matter where I go, there's always One Damn Thing that particular branch doesn't have in stock on any given list, necessitating a visit some days later to a different branch.

Naughty Nigel
7th March 2016, 03:12 PM
I make a list of what I need, and only buy what's on it. Of course, finding it in store is then the problem, as Harold says.

And no matter where I go, there's always One Damn Thing that particular branch doesn't have in stock on any given list, necessitating a visit some days later to a different branch.

We had that problem when we tried online delivery.

There were so many items missing that we had to drive to the supermarket for what we needed, which rather defeated the object! Some of the product substitutions were ridiculous too.

Needless to say we haven't used online grocery shopping since.

I should add that it is also a bad idea to go supermarket shopping when hungry! :o

Graham_of_Rainham
7th March 2016, 03:45 PM
Cigarettes at the front of the store, with three people serving. Pharmacy at the back with only one "assistant"...

Why on earth are e-cigarettes on the pharmacy counter :confused:

Otto
7th March 2016, 03:52 PM
@Nigel - I only went to Ikea once. Never again!

It's interesting that there appears to be a shift from hypermarkets back towards convenience stores again.

Graham_of_Rainham
7th March 2016, 04:39 PM
...
It's interesting that there appears to be a shift from hypermarkets back towards convenience stores again.

My corner shop only buys from the warehouse the items that are on offer from the makers, so most packets are price marked to compete with 1 shops etc..

McVitty ginger nuts in Tesco are 1.35 The corner shop has them for a 1

And I save on fuel and all the haste of the mall trolls. :eek:

Ralph Harwood
7th March 2016, 04:51 PM
they want you to discover and buy new to you stuff as you wander around the store.

The shops are not there for your benefit they are there to maximise the amount sold.

If you want to do quick product selection then buy online and have the goods delivered.

If that is their idea it backfires spectacularly with me - if I can't find anything in my normal supermarket (normally because they have moved it) then I just call into one of the other supermarkets on my way home from work - there are at least three I pass on my normal route. I normally shop after my night shift - all the shops are open by 7am but are almost empty so it's no trouble to pop in for a couple of items.

As for delivery, we tried it once and NEVER AGAIN. We asked for a delivery between 8 and 9 pmas my wife was out early evening. Unfortunately the delivery arrived at twenty to eight, when I had two small children in the bath and two spaniels bouncing round the hall. The deliverymans attitude when it took me five minutes to answer the door wasn't great - especially when I pointed out that in fact HE was twenty minutes early!

As for Ikea - my wife loves it but I won't accompany her for the same reason as previously mentioned - the two mile hike past things I have no interest in and no space for either. The fact that you couldn't take your trolley into the carpark last time I went just rubbed salt into the wound as it took four trips across the carpark carrying heavy boxes whilst my wife watched the kids and trolley!

I don't mind buying mail order, but I do try and use sellers who use royal mail (but not parcelfarce) as we are on first name terms with our postie and know within 10 minutes either way what time he will reach us on his round.

Cheers,

Ralph.

Imageryone
7th March 2016, 05:34 PM
I am an avid internet shopper, No parking, no kids, no bolshie staff and never out of stock.

Walti
7th March 2016, 05:36 PM
My biggest gripe about all supermarkets is that you can easily look online to find the location of the stores but there's no "app" to locate what you want once you are inside the place.

Museums, zoos, amusement parks, etc., all have "guides" but not supermarkets, they want you wandering around in the hope you will pick up something if only out of sheer frustration. :(

I'm currently working on that!

Harold Gough
7th March 2016, 08:41 PM
I should add that it is also a bad idea to go supermarket shopping when hungry! :o

Possible a good idea to go with a full bladder?

Harold

Harold Gough
7th March 2016, 08:46 PM
I am an avid internet shopper, No parking, no kids, no bolshie staff and never out of stock.

Try online purchases of parts for domestic appliances, car parts, etc. They will accept you payment before, eventually, telling you the item is out of stock. No, you don't get an instant refund, they back-order and fail to get it for you.

Harold

Harold Gough
23rd August 2016, 08:37 PM
Tesco strikes again!

Our local branch has large blue, freestanding pillars at the ends of some aisles, bearing words "Some things have moved. If you cannot find an item consult a colleague", or something similar.

So, if I have a problem as a customer, do I have to phone one of my fellow retired work colleagues? Or do I have to become a member of Tesco staff?

Harold

David M
23rd August 2016, 09:13 PM
I'd forgotten about this thread. Earlier this year our local grocery store moved into a new building. The old one had so many leaks in the roof you had to treat the buckets catching the water as a slalom course. Anyway, a week or so before the new store opened everyone got details in the mail including a map of the store and where to find items. They not only got the map back to front, they also got the opening date wrong. :D

Olybirder
23rd August 2016, 10:47 PM
I am probably unusual but I was a big fan of our Lidl store in Lowestoft. The products were largely excellent, the staff were friendly and the store was reasonably spacious and I knew where to find things. Above all, it was incredibly good value. Unfortunately, they are are closed at the moment as the building is being demolished and replaced with a new, larger store on the same site.

My partner and I are now bereft. The Lidl store in Yarmouth is not the same. It seems more cramped, the staff seem less contented and we can't find anything. We have tried Aldi but don't really like it. It seems even more cramped than the Yarmouth Lidl and even less logically laid out. We called in on Sunday afternoon after a walk and it was a nightmare, with customers milling about everywhere in different directions.

We have tried Morrisons, Tescos and Asda etc. but they all seem very expensive after Lidl and we don't like most of the produce as much. I can't wait for February when 'our' store opens again. I hope they haven't spoilt it with the renovation.

Ron

Crazy Dave
24th August 2016, 03:22 AM
Not strictly about supermarket layout but how goods get to the shop. In the 1980's, I worked for a company that supplied private label coffee to many of the major stores and saw the distribution chain in some detail. I was in total awe of the efficiency of whole process, from factory to distributor to regional depot to store. I don't know the number of products a typical supermarket stock but it's probably several thousand. And yet we, me included, get irritated when something is moved or is out of stock.

I sympathise with Harold and if one can't whinge here then where else? That said, if only all our problems were so small.

David

Harold Gough
24th August 2016, 06:02 AM
I don't know the number of products a typical supermarket stock but it's probably several thousand.

Some years ago, I saw a figure of 26,000 for a large one.

Harold

Otto
24th August 2016, 07:54 AM
Anyone remember Timothy Whites, the chemist chain? They started moving things around on a regular basis, presumably thinking that customers would impulse buy something they hadn't gone into the shop for while trying to find what they wanted. It drove me nuts, to the point where I stopped using the shop. I imagine I wasn't the only one as the chain closed shortly afterwards - taken over by Boots if I remember correctly.

dcbrookes
24th August 2016, 12:04 PM
Its not just supermarkets.

We went to Ikea on Saturday to buy a new office chair. :(

Ikea will deliver, but their delivery prices are steep, which is probably because they want you to spend all afternoon in their wretched shop spending money on things you never knew you needed.. :mad:

I needed a new office chair, and decided on a "Markus" from Ikea - I did not fancy the 80-mile round trip to Wednesbury, so I had it delivered at a cost of 7.50 - it pays to check the website carefully!

Over the last few months, while my wife has been unable to drive, we have had many home deliveries from Sainsbury's (Kidderminster) and Tesco (Ludlow). No problems and no unwanted substitutions (again, it pays to study the website carefully). We may be lucky in where we live, but I did not feel that all the negative comments on this subject should pass unchallenged.