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View Full Version : Security Guards harasses a Photographer - so what new


DerekW
1st March 2016, 11:31 AM
The Geordies are a stroppy bunch, two security guards take on a street photographer and waste 7 minutes or so of time and call in the police.

Photographer walks free.

See here for details:

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/03/01/port_of_tyne_security_hassled_photographer_public_ road/

Imageryone
1st March 2016, 12:38 PM
Whereas I can understand the need for tighter security after Paris, 9/11 et al, I do think it is time the laws were made abundantly clear for all to understand, and for Security Staff, whether Public, or Private, should be properly trained in how to apply those laws.
It is a case of bluster in most cases anyway.

Graham_of_Rainham
1st March 2016, 12:43 PM
Pay peanuts...

They do what the boss tells them. But when they get bored they "think" and that's when it goes south :rolleyes:

Imageryone
1st March 2016, 01:09 PM
I take exception to that, Graham, I have great friends who are Security Personel, but they all wag their tails and bark :D:D:D:D:D:D

Peter_Hartland
1st March 2016, 02:36 PM
I have had that before & produced my ID card & said please inform my security department I am sure they will need to know I am terriost with the toys I have available to play with as a Complex Weapons Engineer working for HMG.

As far as I know the only places you can not photograph from a public place are MoD property. You would only generally be challenged on high level sites or where you are taking images of surity arrangement.

pdk42
1st March 2016, 03:33 PM
Alas, it's a reflection of society. Everyone is obsessed with security and risk. What's worse is that in many cities, London especially, public spaces are becoming more and more "privatised" meaning that security guards really can stop you from taking photographs, and a host of other things we take for granted in a free society. There's a really interesting article about it here:

http://www.theguardian.com/cities/2015/aug/04/pops-privately-owned-public-space-cities-direct-action

Ricoh
1st March 2016, 05:52 PM
Jobs worth award if ever I've seen it!

I've been asked to stop shooting inside a private building more than once, but that's fair enough. I'm polite and move on.

Ian Grego
1st March 2016, 07:17 PM
I got formed by a security guard last Thursday evening at the side of the London Eye outside County Hall. That you are allowed to take photos, as a few thousand do during the day. But you can not use a tripod. If you use a tripod you are a professional. So you must pay for the privilege. As the sun had set I couldn't be bothered to waste my breath

Jim Ford
1st March 2016, 07:25 PM
The Geordies are a stroppy bunch

I guess the two in question are classic "Scotsmen with their brains kicked out"!

;^)

Jim

skids
1st March 2016, 07:32 PM
I got formed by a security guard last Thursday evening at the side of the London Eye outside County Hall. That you are allowed to take photos, as a few thousand do during the day. But you can not use a tripod. If you use a tripod you are a professional. So you must pay for the privilege. As the sun had set I couldn't be bothered to waste my breath

I'd be up for going there with a Gorillapod and see what they make of that.

Wee man
1st March 2016, 07:36 PM
Whilst understanding the reasoning I do have to smile, I have been using cameras in Belfast and other places on Northern Ireland over the last forty years and the only things I avoided was police/ army personnel at check points, police stations and army barracks. I took shots outside and inside security cordons. I was only challenged about twice and this was at bomb sites when robots were being used. Our terrorists would have been harder to pick out as a coloured friend said to me ' you all look the same' . I have had more bother with parents asking that I think I am doing when taking bird shots in a local forest or on the beach when they are convinced I am taking their little dears. It seems common sense has gone out the window and worse someone has now closed it!

drmarkf
1st March 2016, 10:31 PM
I recommend we should all be using an iPhone 6 on a selfie stick. Security will assume you're another tourist and won't bother you.

I get approached by security guards regularly when shooting in London and just smile, say "sorry, I didn't realise" and move on. I certainly take a lot of shots in malls and other places that I know are interdit, but I keep moving in such places so mostly it's not a problem.

It is hard to tell in more open areas, and I'm sure security is over-reaching itself regularly, but it isn't worth the time arguing when you could be shooting somewhere else.

A couple of friends have had significant confrontations, both in Cambridge and London, but that probably has something to do with the way they approach the whole process!

Taken dispassionately, of course, the whole area just demonstrates how we are allowing ourselves to slip lazily towards 1984, dominated by corporate paranoia and the power of international money, and our hard-won freedoms are disappearing daily (yes, Ms Home Secretary, I am talking about you!).

Graham_of_Rainham
1st March 2016, 10:40 PM
As far as I know the only places you can not photograph from a public place are MoD property. You would only generally be challenged on high level sites or where you are taking images of surity arrangement.

I was with MOD most of my working life. Even at sites with armed patrols and very big dogs, people would photograph the sites from "public" places. While the signs said "don't" it was sometimes amusing watching people outside the fence, furtively taking pictures. They then got in their cars and drove away, probably without ever thinking that we had much better cameras and could capture the details on the TAX disk, yet alone the number plate... :cool:

...If you use a tripod you are a professional. So you must pay for the privilege...

I'm very tempted to tie wrap a monopod to a Zimmer Frame, to be able to shout "Disability Discrimination" at anyone that challenges the use of a stability aid. :rolleyes:

Zuiko
2nd March 2016, 01:24 AM
The police should get a positive mention as they appear to have acted correctly and sensitively in this situation. As for the "security," sadly I don't think they would recognise a terrorist if one walked up to them and introduced himself. It's rather worrying if that is the calibre of people employed to protect important facilities and locations, especially as they clearly do not understand the laws that govern their powers and boundaries.

SteveJ
2nd March 2016, 10:09 AM
On a more serious note, Youtube is full of video's like this. People holding their B****y phones at the wrong angle when shooting video. :confused: :confused:

Steve

Harold Gough
2nd March 2016, 10:28 AM
Security guards have no more powers than anyone else. If they detain you that is unlawful imprisonment.

Tripods can be a cause of obstruction.

Harold

Naughty Nigel
2nd March 2016, 10:29 AM
The police should get a positive mention as they appear to have acted correctly and sensitively in this situation. As for the "security," sadly I don't think they would recognise a terrorist if one walked up to them and introduced himself. It's rather worrying if that is the calibre of people employed to protect important facilities and locations, especially as they clearly do not understand the laws that govern their powers and boundaries.

Agreed. Unfortunately security guards tend not to be the sharpest knives in the drawer, and are usually on the Minimum Wage, so we get what they pay for.

Having said that I have fond memories of a Security Guard who worked at our factory in Gateshead, and who had previously been a Prison Officer at HMP Durham. His favourite phrase was "I couldn't care if you's the Queen of ****ing Sheba man; there's noah wear"! :D

I have on occasions needed to take photographs inside a large MOD site near to Plymouth in Devon. One is quite correctly challenged by anyone and everyone when doing so; but the MOD provide a security pass to those authorised to carry and use photographic equipment, so any issue is quickly resolved. Surely it would be possible to have a similar arrangement for civilian use?

I know it shouldn't be required, but there must be a better way of doing things than the constant risk of conflict that we have now. The real irony is that thanks to mobile phones we take more photographs now than we ever have in history, but we dare not use anything that looks like a proper camera.

Having said that, I have never had a problem using my Mamiya film cameras. :confused:

However, I must say I do like Graham's idea of using a Zimmer Frame for stability! :D

DerekW
2nd March 2016, 10:39 AM
and also holding it vertically so when the video is shown on TV they get the out of focus ghost reflection of the main image on either side of the main vertical image.

If they are going to take sneaky pics at least take decent sneaky pics.

IanB
3rd March 2016, 12:05 AM
not a problem in my bit of bush :rolleyes: