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Harold Gough
25th February 2016, 09:07 AM
All regular household bill are paid for by direct debit, so I take limited notice of paper statements (apart from bank account ones). Even so, I noticed that the latest post from the water company was addressed to our son, who lives with us.

Our son promptly handed the contents to me. It was an account statement, correct in all detail, apart from his name substituted for mine. He had never been in contact with the water company nor does he use the same bank.

I checked our (my wife and myself) bank statements and the payments has been made correctly.

So I rang the 0800 number for dealing with such problems and explained that they should not even be aware of our son's name.

So far as I got an explanation, it seems that some credit agency (our son has a Student Loan) has "updated" my name. I wonder how many other people might have benefitted from this service.

Harold

OM USer
25th February 2016, 01:10 PM
Try getting your name changed on a household/utility account and its nigh on impossible.

Harold Gough
25th February 2016, 01:18 PM
I have just referred this matter to my MP.

Harold

Zuiko
26th February 2016, 12:34 AM
I wonder about the current TV advert where Experian claim they have a credit score for everyone. How? There must be a lot of unauthorised sharing of confidential information going on within the financial services industry. :confused:

RogerMac
26th February 2016, 04:17 AM
I am not usually a conspiracy theorist but this makes me deeply suspicious as it seems possible that it could be the first stage of a plot to prove your son was the householder and possibly put a charge against the house for his debt.

Harold Gough
26th February 2016, 06:12 AM
I am not usually a conspiracy theorist but this makes me deeply suspicious as it seems possible that it could be the first stage of a plot to prove your son was the householder and possibly put a charge against the house for his debt.

The debt is being paid off, as per Student Loan agreement, so there s no need.

Harold

Naughty Nigel
26th February 2016, 09:01 AM
There seem to be too many large databases containing our name and address details which are shared around by businesses for their own purposes. I believe it is entirely conceivable that this is now your son's name came to appear on your water bill.

You would think that big business would keep their own databases but they seem to rely others such as Royal Mail. We know this because our postal address is INCORRECT every time, often resulting in mail and deliveries going astray.

We also had an issue with communications from one particular department of Barclays, who were consistently sending incorrectly addressed mail.

When I complained about this I was told that they use numerous different databases from different sources, and it is often difficult for them to track down the correct database to correct it. :mad:

Presumably these same databases are also used to shower us with junk mail and unwanted phone calls? :(

Zuiko
26th February 2016, 10:11 AM
The debt is being paid off, as per Student Loan agreement, so there s no need.

Harold

But when those debts are eventually privatised (as they will be), they will be a more attractive investment if a significant proportion are deemed to be secured by a charge on a property. The plot thickens. ;)

Harold Gough
27th February 2016, 07:17 AM
But when those debts are eventually privatised (as they will be), they will be a more attractive investment if a significant proportion are deemed to be secured by a charge on a property. The plot thickens. ;)

Even if the debtor has no interest in the property i.e. owns no part of it?

Harold

Zuiko
27th February 2016, 12:34 PM
Even if the debtor has no interest in the property i.e. owns no part of it?

Harold

No, I was being a bit tongue-in-cheek. Essentially a charge on the property would be a second mortgage with all the paper work and terms & conditions signed by the owners that go with that. But it is conceivable that by portraying the debtors (i.e. the students) as home owners and therefore a better credit risk the packaged loans could look more attractive to potential investors. However, that's a mute point because without doubt if student loans are privatised repayment will be underwritten by the government in any case.

Adagio
27th February 2016, 01:50 PM
Complain to the Information Commissioner

https://ico.org.uk/concerns/

pdk42
27th February 2016, 02:25 PM
Copying of databases containing our details is all too common. Each of us is probably documented in pushing a hundred databases of various kinds from credit fraud through to retailer loyalty schemes.

There was a well documented case of a man in the US who suddenly found himself unemployable for reasons he couldn't understand. He eventually challenged one prospective employer to reveal what seemed a rapid change of heart over his suitability and discovered that his criminal record check had him down as a convicted murderer. Further digging revealed that his Social Security Number (effectively every citizen's unique ID in the USA) had been incorrectly entered into a police data base.

So, problem solved then? - not at all. The police sell their data to agencies who then combine it with data from other sources and then sell it on to end users and other agencies who then sell it on again etc etc. The result was that his fallacious murder conviction was spread across a huge number of databases, the existence of which was extremely hard to discover, let alone to correct.

Things are little better here. There are some laws around data protection, but in truth they're pretty weak and don't stop personal data being traded. The most hilarious example of this is that the data the ambulance chasers get on traffic accident "victims" so they can help then make insurance claims on everything from whiplash to migraines comes from.... the insurance companies. Yes, they can make a dime selling the data, even if it means more claims. More claims simply means premiums go up, so they don't care.