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Melaka
19th February 2016, 11:24 AM
What's going on in Aussie schools? This is the text of an email about my PayPal account purporting to come from a .au website.

CAUTION: If this makes SPAM email because our system error. Please remove this email to INBOX so as not to repeat this mistake again in the future. Recently, There was unusual activity on your account, so we were forced to turn off the profit of your account, if you want to re-activate account, you will be asked to fill out the data you need activate your account Click "Update Now"

Perhaps a non native English speaker might be taken in, but spammers really should try harder!

Internaut
19th February 2016, 11:37 AM
That won't be from Australia as such. I don't see an upward inflection in that writing :-/.

Ross the fiddler
19th February 2016, 12:13 PM
What's going on in Aussie schools? This is the text of an email about my PayPal account purporting to come from a .au website.

CAUTION: If this makes SPAM email because our system error. Please remove this email to INBOX so as not to repeat this mistake again in the future. Recently, There was unusual activity on your account, so we were forced to turn off the profit of your account, if you want to re-activate account, you will be asked to fill out the data you need activate your account Click "Update Now"

Perhaps a non native English speaker might be taken in, but spammers really should try harder!

With due respect, if you thought that was actually Aussie (& more importantly, from PayPal) then you got sucked into an Asian scam physhing email! :eek: ;)

That's true, their attempt at English just totally gives these spammers away. The scumbags try it on the phone too. They don't get a polite response from me though.

*chr

Jim Ford
19th February 2016, 12:49 PM
That won't be from Australia as such. I don't see an upward inflection in that writing :-/.

See:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-28708526

It winds me up! My partner's daughter has been in Australia for about 10 years and has adopted the affectation.

Jim

Ross the fiddler
19th February 2016, 01:35 PM
See:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-28708526

It winds me up! My partner's daughter has been in Australia for about 10 years and has adopted the affectation.

Jim

Thanks for the link. It makes for some interesting reading.

Naughty Nigel
19th February 2016, 05:25 PM
I am confused. I find the 'upward inflection' intensely irritating but I fail to see how it indicates that a question is being asked. :confused:

I have not given this subject much thought, but whenever I ask a question any inflection tends to be downwards.

Melaka
19th February 2016, 06:00 PM
With due respect, if you thought that was actually Aussie (& more importantly, from PayPal) then you got sucked into an Asian scam physhing email! :eek: ;)

*chr

If it had been anything other than a purported .au address I couldn't have wound you up!

pandora
19th February 2016, 07:45 PM
WORTH REMEMBERING :D

"Henry Look at her, a prisoner of the gutter,
Condemned by every syllable she ever uttered.
By law she should be taken out and hung,
For the cold-blooded murder of the English tongue.
Eliza Aaoooww! Henry imitating her Aaoooww!
Heaven's! What a noise!
This is what the British population,
Calls an elementary education. Pickering Oh,
Counsel, I think you picked a poor example. Henry Did I?
Hear them down in Soho square,
Dropping "h's" everywhere.
Speaking English anyway they like.
You sir, did you go to school?
Man Wadaya tike me for, a fool?
Henry No one taught him 'take' instead of 'tike!
Why can't the English teach their children how to speak?
This verbal class distinction, by now,
Should be antique. If you spoke as she does, sir,
Instead of the way you do,
Why, you might be selling flowers, too!
Hear a Yorkshireman, or worse,
Hear a Cornishman converse,
I'd rather hear a choir singing flat.
Chickens cackling in a barn Just like this one!
Eliza Garn! Henry I ask you, sir, what sort of word is that?
It's "Aoooow" and "Garn" that keep her in her place.
Not her wretched clothes and dirty face.
Why can't the English teach their children how to speak?
This verbal class distinction by now should be antique.
If you spoke as she does, sir, Instead of the way you do,
Why, you might be selling flowers, too.
An Englishman's way of speaking absolutely classifies him,
The moment he talks he makes some other
Englishman despise him.
One common language I'm afraid we'll never get.
Oh, why can't the English learn to set
A good example to people whose
English is painful to your ears?
The Scotch and the Irish leave you close to tears.
There even are places where English completely
disappears. In America, they haven't used it for years!
Why can't the English teach their children how to speak?
Norwegians learn Norwegian; the Greeks have taught their
Greek. In France every Frenchman knows
his language fro "A" to "Zed"
The French never care what they do, actually,
as long as they pronounce in properly.
Arabians learn Arabian with the speed of summer lightning.
And Hebrews learn it backwards,
which is absolutely frightening.
But use proper English you're regarded as a freak.
Why can't the English,
Why can't the English learn to speak? "

Ross the fiddler
19th February 2016, 09:25 PM
I am confused. I find the 'upward inflection' intensely irritating but I fail to see how it indicates that a question is being asked. :confused:

I have not given this subject much thought, but whenever I ask a question any inflection tends to be downwards.

Don't you get it? :eek: (Ending with an upward inflection) That would not sound so much like a question if it had a downward inflection. ;) But then, I suppose it depends on what you're used to hearing, I guess. :rolleyes:

*chr

Jim Ford
19th February 2016, 10:19 PM
Don't you get it? :eek: (Ending with an upward inflection) That would not sound so much like a question if it had a downward inflection. ;) But then, I suppose it depends on what you're used to hearing, I guess. :rolleyes:

*chr

Nigel's a Northerner!

;^)

Jim