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phoebepants
20th December 2008, 11:48 PM
Hi

We are complete beginners at this and are looking to build up our kit as we only have the standard lens supplied with the e-410 so i would like to pick your brains!

what lens would you recommend? looking for something with a bit of zoom compared to the 17.5-45mm

Where is the best place to purchase and what kind of price range are we looking at?

are there any lenses at all other than the zuiko that will fit?

what basic equipment can you recommend that is reasonably priced in order for us to have a play with?

Sorry to bombard you with all these questions but we are complete beginners and really want to get into this hobby.

Thanks

Shell

skyman1
21st December 2008, 01:08 AM
There are some 4/3rds lenses made by Sigma and Panasonic available ,and some TTL flashes by Panasonic and Metz available
As for what lenses it is in my case a lot to do with your budget you have to look at what you have to spend and decide the lens you want ,the lens you want is as usual more than you have set your budget for :( at least that is the norm in my case although I have a Olympus digital 40-150mm Kit Zoom and find it quite good for a kit lens got mine for 95 some on Ebay new about 70-110 Hope that helps you

Zuiko
21st December 2008, 01:44 AM
I also endorse the 40-150mm. I have the older f3.5/f4.5 version and think it is a belter for the price - a real bargain! (there's one on ebay at the moment, latest bid 77 with 18 hours remaining).

It's if you want to go wider that it works out a bit expensive. If you want to go just a little wider the 14-42mm is very affordable and its got great close focusing abilities. 14mm compared to 17.5mm is actually a bigger difference in practice than it seems on paper! However, to go any wider will be rather expensive, especially if you look at Zuikos. Cheapest option would be the Sigma 10-20mm which I believe I've seen advertised new for around 300.

Hope this helps, but don't get hung up too much on feeling the need for focal lengths you haven't got. The range you already have in your existing kit lens is surprisingly versatile and if you are new to photography you could benefit from learning to use this lens and explore its full potential thoroughly before buying new glass. :)

theMusicMan
21st December 2008, 07:08 AM
Hi Shell

As has already been said here, to suggest a lens for you that we feel will meet your photography requirements really depends on knowing several factors, namely;

your budget
your photography interests (what you are looking to take shots of)
what IQ (image quality) you want/expect from the shotsHaving said that, what we all agree on here is that the other 'kit' lenses supplied by Olympus, despite being very cheap, are optically superb and yield excellent results. John mentions the 40-150mm lens which is a cracker for the money, and will allow you to get in a lot closer to your subject, then there's the 14-42mm, again optically super for the price, which gives you a few more mm at the wide end.

So, if you're after 'closer' type shots, maybe of people, animals etc, then possibly opt for the 40-150, but if you want to take landscapes or buildings, then perhaps the 14-42 might be a better choice.

After these, the price starts to go up, not much I might add, but it does start to increase.

If you're after range, then I can totally recommend the Zuiko 70-300mm - which as many around here will already know, I love to use and thoroughly recommend the lens. If you don't mind my saying so myself, I have managed some good results with this lens, especially with bird photography (feel free to take a look in my gallery at the Skomer Island shots - as most were taken with this lens). These can be obtained around the 200 mark now, which is a bargain for such a long telephoto lens. It takes a little getting used to and 'learning', but the IQ is excellent.

If you are after general purpose range; then one has to suggest the excellent Zuiko 14-54mm. This is in the next class of quality lenses and is branded as a semi-pro lens. The zoom range suits most instances, and I have used mine for much portrait work. Available around the 400 price mark.

If your interest is wide angle, then one has to suggest the Zuiko 11-22mm which is a fantastic lens, pin sharp across the range, and shows little if any distortion despite being quite wide at 11mm. This lens is a little more expensive and can be found for around 450-550.

Finally, I might just suggest one more lens. If you are interested in Macro (close up) photography, I can suggest the Zuiko 35mm. It is relatively inexpensive (at around 125-175) and yields excellent results at close range.

There you go, how's that for an introductory summary... please do let us know what you eventually go for, and do post your images. We love looking at images.

John

phoebepants
21st December 2008, 03:33 PM
thanks for the replies will def look at the 40-150mm budget for this prob about a 100. was thinking that once we had this we could maybe experiment with different filters etc just to have a play about and then see where we go from there.

we are looking to photo anything and everything. Chris is quite interested with playing with the long exposure and lights and i'm more into taking pics of our little girl and stuff while we are out and about.

We have so much to learn about this hobby but are willing to put in the groundwork and the pennies to get to where we want to go!

Graham_of_Rainham
21st December 2008, 04:21 PM
I'd recommend ebay (from a good seller) that way if you find you don't like/use the kit you simply sell it and look on any loss as a hire fee ;)

*chr

Jim Ford
21st December 2008, 05:19 PM
We are complete beginners at this and are looking to build up our kit as we only have the standard lens supplied with the e-410 so i would like to pick your brains!

what lens would you recommend? looking for something with a bit of zoom compared to the 17.5-45mm


The 17.5-45mm is probably the least well regarded of the kit lenses. If a 14-42mm comes your way at a good price, it may be a good idea if you bought it - you may notice a significant image improvement. The 14mm is also considerably wider than than 17.5mm and the 14-42mm lens has a hood, which (IIRC) the 17.5-45 doesn't.

Whilst the 40-150mm lens is excellent, you may be better off jumping straight to the 70-300mm and 'work round' the 25mm gap.

Jim

Jim

JackBenedict
21st December 2008, 07:50 PM
Take your time buying additional lenses. There may be some bargains to be had right here on this forum,after Santa has visited a few houses with forum members wish lists.:D:o

That's what I did,and was very pleased

Good Luck,

Have a nice Christmas

DTD
21st December 2008, 08:23 PM
I think the accessory that adds most to picture taking is a tripod but be warned, very cheap ones are usually worst than useless, budget about 100+

Graham_of_Rainham
21st December 2008, 08:57 PM
I think the accessory that adds most to picture taking is a tripod but be warned, very cheap ones are usually worst than useless, budget about 100+

My tripod cost 10 at a car boot sale and is as solid as you would want. They also don't add much to the image quality, unless you are into a specific type of photography.

Think twice about how best to spend that hard earned and buy what you really feel you need to have to get the shots you want.

Most important of all is have fun capturing the moments that are precious to you & yours

*chr

Makonde
21st December 2008, 10:04 PM
In order, I suggest:

1. tripod

2. proper flashgun

3. 40-150mm zoom (which is very good) But the lens you have is a good general-purpose range of focal lengths to start with.

If there is still money over, then after that, one of the two macro lenses, the 70-300 or the 9-18mm depending on whether you want first to add macro, distant wildlife or landscape/buildings. UV & polarising filters.

Ellie
22nd December 2008, 01:19 AM
I've got an E-400, have the 14-42mm, 40-150mm (which were the kit lenses) and also have the 70-300mm which I bought secondhand through a forum. It's an absolutely brilliant lens. I think I'd so the same again, but was happy enough with the first two lenses for quite some time.

[tripods] ... don't add much to the image quality, unless you are into a specific type of photography.
I'm sorry to disagree. It's hard to use the 70-300 handheld with the E-400, it's unwieldy because it's heavier than the camera body. There's no image stabilisation either, so a tripod is a must with that particular lens/camera combination. I'd think it's probably the same with the E-410 (no IS) but I'm sure somebody who's got one will say if the combination works well or not.

Chris is quite interested with playing with the long exposure and lights
You can't do long exposures without using some form of support for the camera - to make sure it stays still. A beanbag or a jumper is better than nothing, even a soft handbag is good for raising the camera off the ground.

I spent a long time looking at tripods and bought a fairly expensive one secondhand. I waited for almost a year for it to become available at auction. I made sure I chose one that would extend to my eye level without extending the centre column, which decreased possible wobble, and also was capable of being used as a grounder - which is important to me. Mine is a Velbon and is a super piece of equipment, I can carry it all day without any trouble because it's carbon fibre.

You also need a decent tripod head, one that suits you. It's important you try it with your camera before buying.

A monopod might be a viable alternative, but some people buy them and never use them. You'd also need a 'head' to go with it.

i'm more into taking pics of our little girl and stuff while we are out and about
I've found the 40-150 is quite good for photographing people, you don't have to be quite as close to fill the frame with the subject.

Try looking through some of the portraits taken on here and see which lens has been used.

You need to make sure you've got a decent bag too. I mostly use an ordinary top-loading backpack if I'm out for the day, with a thick foam pad in the base and some padded inserts for the lenses. They look a bit like this
https://www.vistek.ca/store/ProPhotoBagsCases/161336/domke-padded-insert-2-comprt-3x6x8/Compare.aspx

On camera flash isn't bad, but you need to remember to leave the lens hood off the 14-42 lens because it can throw a horrible shadow which spoils the picture.

Melaka
22nd December 2008, 06:52 AM
The most important thing is to start taking photos. If you like what you're getting, fine, if not there's loads of good advice above.

benvendetta
23rd December 2008, 07:05 AM
The most important thing is to start taking photos. If you like what you're getting, fine, if not there's loads of good advice above.

Absolutely agree on that one!

phoebepants
27th December 2008, 09:57 PM
Hi

Thanks for all the replies, hope you all had a fab xmas.

Well we went out today and the other half bought himself a 55-200mm sigma fro 109 from the local camera shop reduced from 169. Although he hasn't had a proper play he so far has been really impressed with it so we're going to head out soon and have a proper play. I also bought him a macro ring set from ebay and so far seems to like it, we will be getting a proper macro lens eventually but thought that it was worth a go for 15. This fits on the 17.5-45mm lens so we have plenty of things to experiment with now:D

Thanks again for all your sound advice
Shell