PDA

View Full Version : The Missing Gadget: Lens Warmer


Harold Gough
6th February 2016, 10:34 AM
We visited the RHS Gardens at Wisley this week, for the combined butterfly and orchid event.

I had visited tropical glasshouses before, with a film camera, the Fern House at Kew having been notable for steaming up spectacles and lenses, but that was after walking round the gardens for some time, on a coldish day.

At Wisley, even though we walked straight to the exhibit, entered via a cool greenhouse, and moved over quite a few minutes to the hot and humid one, the front of my lens (and viewfinder) steamed up repeated over quite a long period. Even when I had that sorted, I found the images were very soft. The back of the lens was also affected and I began to fear got the sensor.

Apparently, there was some advice, which I had not seen, to warm it all up under the hand drier in the toilets.

What is needed is a thermostatically-controlled camera bag, so that everything arrives at the greenhouse temperature.

While you might ask "why not just be patient?", at busy times you book a time slot. I don't know how long that is, but no longer than an hour, and you need more than that to make the best of the butterflies.

The most really, really annoying thing was that camera phones, which were prolific, being carried in pockets, did not have the problem.

Harold

Imageryone
6th February 2016, 10:57 AM
Camera phones may not appear to have a problem, but water ingress is a really major contributor to their total failure.
I find a Ziplock bag works best. Just keep the camera in there until the temp equalises, all that condensation stays on the outside, same when you go from cold outside to warm interior.

Graham_of_Rainham
6th February 2016, 10:57 AM
As soft as this :D

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/PC162111_WS.JPG (http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/88262)

Even after I had go rid of all the condensation of the front element, there was so much red light coming from the heaters that I had to use some flash.

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/PC162115_WS.JPG (http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/88263)

Harold Gough
6th February 2016, 11:09 AM
As soft as this :D

Even after I had go rid of all the condensation of the front element, there was so much red light coming from the heaters that I had to use some flash.



Probably, without the rosy glow. Same species too.

I used flash throughout.

Harold

Harold Gough
6th February 2016, 11:11 AM
Camera phones may not appear to have a problem, but water ingress is a really major contributor to their total failure.
I find a Ziplock bag works best. Just keep the camera in there until the temp equalises, all that condensation stays on the outside, same when you go from cold outside to warm interior.

But how do you know when it has equalised? A thermometer could check the air in the bag but not of the glass.

Harold

DerekW
6th February 2016, 11:26 AM
When staying in Florida I used to heat the camera and lenses with the hair dryer before going out into the very humid air from the 75 F air conditioned room.

Imageryone
6th February 2016, 12:24 PM
But how do you know when it has equalised? A thermometer could check the air in the bag but not of the glass.

Harold

Basically,when the condensation disappears off the bag, Harold :)

David M
6th February 2016, 12:47 PM
The ziplok bag/hand/hair dryer tip works for smaller equipment. I got a tip from a.photographer who did some work in mines. He baked his medium format kit in an oven before putting it in an insulated case. It was still warm when he unpacked it in the mine. I used the oven trick to dry out some OM kit that had been submerged in Georgian Bay.

Harold Gough
6th February 2016, 01:17 PM
If the occasion arises again, I will consider placing fishermen's hand-warmers in the bag.

I have a one hour drive (car interior not usually at 80F) to either of the butterfly locations, plus (at least at Wisley) a long walk in the open.

Harold

Wally
6th February 2016, 01:52 PM
In the past I've used a hand warmer gel pack called Nexcare HotCold Hot Instant. Wrapping a microfibre cloth around the camera/lens with the gel pack worked wonders. Useful too, when going into the freezing cold and tied around the wrists with rubber bands. A quick pop into boiling water and they're ready to use again and again...

Harold Gough
6th February 2016, 02:17 PM
In the past I've used a hand warmer gel pack called Nexcare HotCold Hot Instant. Wrapping a microfibre cloth around the camera/lens with the gel pack worked wonders. Useful too, when going into the freezing cold and tied around the wrists with rubber bands. A quick pop into boiling water and they're ready to use again and again...

Thanks. I have a feeling that something like that might lurk in one of the darker corners of this house.

Harold

Steambuff
6th February 2016, 02:31 PM
I used the body/hand warmers (the 7-8 Hour disposable ones) in my camera bag when I was in Lapland over Christmas ... put them in the bag a few hours before going out ... kept things nice and warm.

Still put the camera in a zip-lock bag when going indoors to be safe.

Worked for me

Dave

birdboy
6th February 2016, 05:01 PM
I suffered from this at night trying to do astrophotography so did some research. I have 12v dew heater tapes now which is only any good if you can carry around a 12vDC battery pack. The battery free option I was most impressed with is a product called "LensMuff" $24.95 which uses disposable hand warmers.

http://www.kadamsphoto.com/catalog/digital-after-dark-lensmuff-keeping-your-lens-p-85.html