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David M
19th January 2016, 06:42 PM
Depth of field (also applies to depth of beach, depth of water or depth of snow) - refers to how much the photographer and their tripod sinks into the ground. In deep depth of field circumstances some photographers prefer a backwards tripod such as a Gitzo Safari or Kennett.

Depth of focus - the amount of focus adjustment needed to get the corners sharp on some lenses. A common problem is, when one corner is sharp the other three are slightly out of focus by varying degrees and the center can be a long way out.

Circle of confusion - a group of photographers trying to decide if a silver or black lens looks best on the fashion accessory they wear around their necks.

Macro lens - a lens with the ability to focus on objects closer to the lens than a normal lens can. Designed by a Marco diMarco but misspelled on the patent and as a result known as a macro lens ever since.

Tilt and shift lens - a specialist lens designed for working in tight spaces where the photographer has to tilt and shift to avoid people or obstructions. Typical uses are crowded pubs or strip clubs.

Legacy lenses - older lenses from the beginnings of photography. Of little practical use as the lenses are all manual so impossible to use on digital cameras. Some of the larger ones make okay doorstops and smaller ones okay paperweights. Or you can donate them to a photographer capable of manually setting aperture and focus.

Zuiko
19th January 2016, 08:19 PM
Ha ha, I particularly like the depth of field definition - I've worked with some great depth of field in my time! :D

David M
19th January 2016, 08:44 PM
Ha ha, I particularly like the depth of field definition - I've worked with some great depth of field in my time! :D

That one dates back to photo net in the 90's. Originally written after an internet 'expert' didn't know the difference between depth of field and depth of focus.

Jim Ford
19th January 2016, 10:16 PM
Depth of field (also applies to depth of beach, depth of water or depth of snow) - refers to how much the photographer and their tripod sinks into the ground. In deep depth of field circumstances some photographers prefer a backwards tripod such as a Gitzo Safari or Kennett.


I've done that when photographing bog orchids in the New Forest!

I was using a Unil-Loc tripod and a remote release. The problem was that my slightest movement caused the bog to quake and consequently the tripod to tremor. I managed to get a decent shot in the end though.

Jim

David M
20th January 2016, 01:15 PM
I've done that when photographing bog orchids in the New Forest!

I was using a Unil-Loc tripod and a remote release. The problem was that my slightest movement caused the bog to quake and consequently the tripod to tremor. I managed to get a decent shot in the end though.

Jim

I have a couple of Uni-Loc for use in deep water and snow. With the system models you can take the legs off and drain the water out.

The original circle of confusion was a group of bird photographers trying to decide between Canon and Nikon and between 500mm and 600mm. Written in 2003 after a dozen or more bird photographers were stood around in the visitor center at Point Pelee waiting out a 4 hour thunderstorm.

Harold Gough
21st January 2016, 11:34 AM
I though the tilt lens was for photographing jousting re-enactments and the shift lens was for photographing a lady in her nightie.

Harold

David M
21st January 2016, 01:00 PM
I though the tilt lens was for photographing jousting re-enactments and the shift lens was for photographing a lady in her nightie.

Harold

You could be right. Or maybe those apply to lenses that are tilt or shift only. Feel free to add new or different definitions.

Graham_of_Rainham
21st January 2016, 01:57 PM
I always felt that "Barrel" distortion was easily corrected by consuming the contents... :rolleyes:

David M
21st January 2016, 03:01 PM
I always felt that "Barrel" distortion was easily corrected by consuming the contents... :rolleyes:

Good one Graham, I never thought of lens aberrations.

Coma - a lens aberration commonly seen on Flickr when viewing 500 shots of someones cat.

David M
21st January 2016, 05:28 PM
A few more.

Tripod thread - the redundant, threaded hole in the base of a camera. It's possible that the tripod thread will be phased out by camera makers and that tripod makers will retool to make stands for Christmas trees.

Program - an exposure mode where the photographer hands all the decisions over to the camera as it's easier than the photographer having to think.

Auto focus - designed to relieve photographers from the stress and hard work of turning a focusing ring on a lens. Often abbreviated to AF as auto focus is to long for some people to use.

Protective filter - a plain filter screwed on to the front of a lens to protect the front element. As it is for protection some people use two, one on top of the other so if the top one gets damaged there's still one protecting the lens. As the only purpose is to protect the lens you can buy two of the cheapest you can find.

Hot shoe - a mount for holding a flashgun. Called a hot shoe because if you use the wrong combination of camera and flash the shoe can get hot enough to dry your shoes.

Lens mount - simply the mounting that allows you to change lenses on cameras with interchangeable lenses. Each manufacturer has their own mount but it is possible to adapt some manufacturers lenses to other manufacturers bodies. With modern lenses and bodies you need to ensure that the electrical contacts are aligned before attaching the lens with a hammer.

Diffraction - a soft image caused by the photographer being diffracted.

Soft focus - used to describe any out of focus or blurred shots that the photographer claims were deliberate.

Soft focus lens - a lens designed to produce soft images, they often have a red band around the front of the lens.

Portrait lens - a lens designed for taking photos with the camera in vertical orientation.

Fisheye lens - a lens designed for use underwater to take portraits of marine life.

Bellows lens - a lens designed to pump air through the camera to keep the internal components cool.

Aerial lens - a lens designed to make TV antennas and satellite dishes disappear when photographing buildings.

Enlarger lens - used to make things look bigger. Most are converted to fit movie cameras for use in making porn movies.

Mirror lens - designed for taking selfies to post on Facebook. Can also be used to take selfies for other social media sites. Only works when the camera is set to continuous and a minimum of 100 selfies are taken.