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View Full Version : The real reason we use mirroless cameras


martyjward
15th January 2016, 07:39 AM
(Yes I know it's not an Olympus)

https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20160115/61244c77d472acfa78dbbeed4232ed70.jpg

Ricoh
15th January 2016, 07:57 AM
Is that within the new guidelines issued for alcohol consumption, looks like a week's ration to me.

martyjward
15th January 2016, 08:00 AM
Eat & Dink what you like within moderation. If you listened to all the guidelines we would all be living on organic, free range dust.

Kiwi Paul
15th January 2016, 08:07 AM
Eat & Dink what you like within moderation. If you listened to all the guidelines we would all be living on organic, free range dust.

Quite right, but remember one also has to be careful not to exceed the organic free range dust daily recommended allowance :D

Paul

Grumpy Hec
15th January 2016, 08:17 AM
Quite right, but remember one also has to be careful not to exceed the organic free range dust daily recommended allowance :D

Paul

Quite right - compaction of the bowel ( is there such a thing?) is the clear result and we all know where that will lead :eek:

Hec

Wee man
15th January 2016, 08:39 AM
But only the vegan organic free range dust . Washed down with parboiled distilled water.

Grumpy Hec
15th January 2016, 08:45 AM
But only the vegan organic free range dust . Washed down with parboiled distilled water.

Parboiled:(

I have been wasting my time then. I always ensure triple distilled to ensure purity. I took this from the advice on Smirnoff vodka bottles.

Hec

Ricoh
15th January 2016, 08:58 AM
Apparently, there's an increased risk of prostate and breast cancer if limits are exceeded by some margin - bummer if you get both !!

Bikie John
15th January 2016, 10:05 AM
Could happen Steve - breast cancer is not unknown in men. I think the other way round is pretty unlikely though :)

John

Harold Gough
15th January 2016, 10:06 AM
(Yes I know it's not an Olympus)

https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20160115/61244c77d472acfa78dbbeed4232ed70.jpg

Or three of light ale?

Harold

IanB
15th January 2016, 10:48 AM
would be better using a pocket mobile/cell phone camera with that argument :rolleyes:.

Talking Mph pics; I have posted a few from my new galaxy s5 mini on flickr today.

Drink driving is not a drama for me these days; can't afford drink. Can't afford to drive either *yes :(

But *chr anyway

Ricoh
15th January 2016, 10:57 AM
Could happen Steve - breast cancer is not unknown in men. I think the other way round is pretty unlikely though :)

John
True!!
On the plus side you could say to the surgeon 'whip the moob off on the other side while you're at it, wouldn't mind a smaller cup size, but don't want one larger than the other', Lol

StephenL
15th January 2016, 11:03 AM
According to the Chief Medical Officer, and I quote, "there's an increased risk of dying within your lifetime" if you drink alcohol. I actually heard her utter those very words!

Ricoh
15th January 2016, 11:24 AM
According to the Chief Medical Officer, and I quote, "there's an increased risk of dying within your lifetime" if you drink alcohol. I actually heard her utter those very words!

Better than to die a thousand deaths!

Ross the fiddler
15th January 2016, 12:05 PM
Apparently, there's an increased risk of prostate and breast cancer if limits are exceeded by some margin - bummer if you get both !!

Probably been taking the wrong tablets if you do. :rolleyes:

Zuiko
15th January 2016, 12:10 PM
If you follow all the advice on eating and drinking you may or may not live longer, but it will definitely seem like it. The Earth is approximately 4.5 billion years old, so what difference does it make if we live until we're 60, 70, 80 or 90?

I'm here for a good time, not a long time! :D

BTW if using lightweight mirrorless cameras automatically results in increased alcohol consumption, it's no wonder they had to develop 5 axis image stabilization. :D

Otto
15th January 2016, 01:14 PM
The trouble with most such advice is that it's often contradicted some time later. Saturated fat is no longer supposed to be bad for you for example. The new alcohol guidelines are apparently based on a "1% chance" of contracting certain types of cancer, a risk I'm prepared to take so I can enjoy a tipple. I follow the French guidelines on Alcohol. They don't have any :).

Journalist: "Have you lived here all your life?"
Elderly villager: "Not yet".

martyjward
15th January 2016, 01:29 PM
Maybe this is a better comparison... although 2,500 is a lot of money.

http://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20160115/f9f304e2d7de62dc988842fe584fab7c.jpg

David M
15th January 2016, 01:35 PM
Parboiled:(

I have been wasting my time then. I always ensure triple distilled to ensure purity. I took this from the advice on Smirnoff vodka bottles.

Hec

Reminds me of a Motorhead album where they thanked Smirnoff and Carlsberg for their contribution to the album.

Harold Gough
15th January 2016, 03:14 PM
Maybe this is a better comparison... although 2,500 is a lot of money.

http://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20160115/f9f304e2d7de62dc988842fe584fab7c.jpg

I though my Tamron SP300 2.8 at 2.5kg was difficult enough to lift. The first two are nearly 4kg.

Will "2,500" pay for a hernia operation?

Harold

yorky
15th January 2016, 04:11 PM
According to the Chief Medical Officer, and I quote, "there's an increased risk of dying within your lifetime" if you drink alcohol. I actually heard her utter those very words!

You must keep some terrible company Stephem

Ricoh
15th January 2016, 05:22 PM
I though my Tamron SP300 2.8 at 2.5kg was difficult enough to lift. The first two are nearly 4kg.

Will "2,500" pay for a hernia operation?

Harold
Wow, what are you guys photographing with those long, long lenses - distant quasars!! Long for me is 50mm equivalent!

Naughty Nigel
15th January 2016, 07:04 PM
Reminds me of a Motorhead album where they thanked Smirnoff and Carlsberg for their contribution to the album.

Hmmm. So who did Lennon and McCartney thank for their contribution to Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds? :confused: :D

Zuiko
15th January 2016, 07:35 PM
Hmmm. So who did Lennon and McCartney thank for their contribution to Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds? :confused: :D

Officially - the song was inspired by a drawing that John's son Julian did at school of his friend Lucy, with some stars. When John asked him what it was about Julian said, "It's Lucy in the sky with diamonds." It therefore appears to be just coincidence that the main words of the title have the initials LSD. However, McCartney later contradicted this by claiming it was about drugs. It appears to be one of those enigmas to which we can never be sure of the truth.

What is beyond doubt is that "Hey Jude" was written by Paul to comfort Julian Lennon during his parents' divorce.

Petrochemist
15th January 2016, 11:45 PM
(Yes I know it's not an Olympus)

https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20160115/61244c77d472acfa78dbbeed4232ed70.jpg

Never had any decent beer from a can. The extra weight of a bottle can be well worth it! *chr

yorky
16th January 2016, 08:01 PM
I must be dead! or at least embalmed! I have been drinking for 65 years. They told me it would stunt my growth-Gosh-its a good job though, I am 6ft now How tall would I have been if I hadn't been a drinker! Have to go now though, my mate just rung for me to go to a wine tasting!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Zuiko
17th January 2016, 12:33 AM
I must be dead! or at least embalmed! I have been drinking for 65 years. They told me it would stunt my growth-Gosh-its a good job though, I am 6ft now How tall would I have been if I hadn't been a drinker! Have to go now though, my mate just rung for me to go to a wine tasting!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

They say that a little bit of what you fancy does you good, so what harm can there be in having a glass of wine or beer? Mind you, a little bit of Nicole Kidman could make me feel like a new man - which is funny because my wife often says she feels like a new man...... :rolleyes:

Harold Gough
17th January 2016, 12:38 PM
BTW if using lightweight mirrorless cameras automatically results in increased alcohol consumption, it's no wonder they had to develop 5 axis image stabilization. :D

Sadly, only for the camera! :(

Harold

Harold Gough
17th January 2016, 12:42 PM
Never had any decent beer from a can. The extra weight of a bottle can be well worth it! *chr

Have you tried recently? I am a real ale enthusiast and have recently moved to more cans that bottles. Frankly, I can't tell the difference any more than I can between a straight glass and a "jug"

Try those with lots of flavour, such as Ghost Ship, Directors, Ruddle's County or Old Speckled Hen.

Harold

Naughty Nigel
17th January 2016, 01:25 PM
Have you tried recently? I am a real ale enthusiast and have recently moved to more cans that bottles. Frankly, I can't tell the difference any more than I can between a straight glass and a "jug"

Try those with lots of flavour, such as Ghost Ship, Directors, Ruddle's County or Old Speckled Hen.

Harold

All cans (whether for beverages or food) are coated with special lacquers which are applied to the bare metal sheet before extrusion. These lacquers are extremely thin (only a few microns thick) but are essential to prevent corrosion of the container which is a real problem with some soft drinks containing phosphoric acid. (That is why Coca Cola, Pepsi Cola, et al had to retain glass bottles for so long.)

The formulation of these coatings is a very exacting science which has been going on for well over fifty years, so I would be very surprised if the coating spoilt the taste of beer in any way. I would be more concerned about plastic bottles which tend to leach plasticisers (usually phthalates).

Having said that I do prefer the look of a glass bottle. *yes

Otto
17th January 2016, 03:23 PM
Yes, canned beer is not what it used to be. I can't tell the difference between canned and bottled versions of the same beer, but I much prefer the cask version anyway!

Petrochemist
17th January 2016, 05:46 PM
Have you tried recently? I am a real ale enthusiast and have recently moved to more cans that bottles. Frankly, I can't tell the difference any more than I can between a straight glass and a "jug"

Try those with lots of flavour, such as Ghost Ship, Directors, Ruddle's County or Old Speckled Hen.

Harold

Locally I've only seen Ghost Ship in bottles though I admit the others are drinkable & I've seen them in cans often enough. when out & about I tend to drink from the bottle, drinking direct from the can gives a metallic taste - similar to the beer they served in Russia - enough to turn anyone to shorts!
All the beers I like are those with lots of flavour, generally preferring the darker varieties with less hops than the Speckled hen. (Not necessarily high alcohol some of the Milds are good)
Favorites are winter ales & Belgium Doubles (especially Roquefort 8) . A recent find being Hatherwoods 'Winter warmer' (Currently 1.25 in Lidl - must remeber to stock up before they run out.)

Petrochemist
17th January 2016, 05:50 PM
Yes, canned beer is not what it used to be. I can't tell the difference between canned and bottled versions of the same beer, but I much prefer the cask version anyway!

Have you ever tried carrying a cask along with your camera stuff??
I've carried a polypin (18 pints IIRC) for a few miles, & it got be a bit of a struggle. Must have got weak at the knees as I could barely Stand :D

Bikie John
17th January 2016, 07:31 PM
A polypin is 36 pints. The "pin" is one of the standard barrel sizes - the "barrel" sort of got standardized a very long time ago at 36 gallons. Half a barrel, 18 gallons, was a kilderkin and half a kilderkin was a firkin. Halve it again and you get a pin, 4.5 gallons = 36 pints.

Hence the old brewers' expression "For two pins I'd give you a firkin".

John

Petrochemist
17th January 2016, 07:50 PM
Thanks John,
I remembered later that the 18 pint ones were sold as demipins. some what easier to carry, but still worth using my modified rucksack.
On these old trips several people claimed to have manged a Firkin over the course of a week. It may be a firkin small measure but its more than I can manage :)

Otto
18th January 2016, 09:16 AM
Have you ever tried carrying a cask along with your camera stuff??

No, I take a flask of coffee and then go to the pub afterwards :).
*chr

Naughty Nigel
18th January 2016, 10:55 AM
Locally I've only seen Ghost Ship in bottles though I admit the others are drinkable & I've seen them in cans often enough. when out & about I tend to drink from the bottle, drinking direct from the can gives a metallic taste - ......

That is an interesting observation.

The only part of the package that cannot be coated is the edge of the metal cap where the can is opened by the ring pull.

I have never noticed a metallic taste when drinking canned beer from a glass, but there is sometimes a slightly metallic taste when drinking it directly.

Under normal circumstances the aluminium surface will form a protective oxide layer almost instantly on exposure, so there should be little risk of the beer becoming tainted. However, in drinking directly from the container (which I would aver is common behaviour! ;) ) the oxide layer may be disturbed, and contact with the lips will give a metallic taste. :D

Naughty Nigel
18th January 2016, 10:57 AM
Have you ever tried carrying a cask along with your camera stuff??

No, but a hip flask is easy enough to carry. *yes

Ricoh
18th January 2016, 01:43 PM
I have never noticed a metallic taste when drinking canned beer from a glass, but there is sometimes a slightly metallic taste when drinking it directly.


It's the alzheimers kicking in :) - aluminium and brain cells don't go well together! I remember pots and pans being aluminium, until they realised the link and cause.
As an aside, aluminium in drinking water used to be a problem for long term dialysis patients - having realised the link, health authorities introduced reverse osmosis to filter the water for dialysis.

Naughty Nigel
18th January 2016, 02:40 PM
It's the alzheimers kicking in :) - aluminium and brain cells don't go well together! I remember pots and pans being aluminium, until they realised the link and cause.
As an aside, aluminium in drinking water used to be a problem for long term dialysis patients - having realised the link, health authorities introduced reverse osmosis to filter the water for dialysis.

I don't know whether the link between aluminium and Alzheimer's has ever been proven, has it?

Tea contains a lot of aluminium, and there were concerns that it might increase the risk of Alzheimer's, but I thought that had now been dismissed.

However, the greatest risk when using aluminium pans was the addition of sodium ions to the water (in other words cooking salt) which significantly increased the quantity of aluminium (and salt) in cooked vegetables!

The solubility of aluminium in pure water is negligible, otherwise pans would soon become too thin to cook in.

Ricoh
18th January 2016, 03:20 PM
You're right, not Alzheimer's, but according to the clinicians I was in touch with when I worked in the industry, it was thought that there was a link with dementia. I remember reverse osmosis water treatment being introduced. ~10 years or more of dialysis on bog standard tap water had an attendant risk of dementia.
Regarding pans, yes you need to liberate aluminium cations.

Ricoh
18th January 2016, 03:26 PM
Mirrors used to use an amalgam of tin and mercury - that's a good reason to go mirrorless!

Naughty Nigel
18th January 2016, 03:32 PM
Mirrors used to use an amalgam of tin and mercury - that's a good reason to go mirrorless!

Yes. Mercury was also used by hat makers, hence the term "mad as a hatter"!

(I can even remember high street outfitters using it to prepare top hats for use.)

Ricoh
18th January 2016, 04:21 PM
When I was at school doing O levels, just a few years back :), we were invited to submerge our hands in a bath of mercury - whilst no doubt inhaling mucuric oxide - the invitation being from a teacher!! God knows where he was taught to be a science teacher!!

Graham_of_Rainham
18th January 2016, 04:41 PM
(Yes I know it's not an Olympus)

https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20160115/61244c77d472acfa78dbbeed4232ed70.jpg

Only Olympus IS can compensate for the effects of the alcohol wearing off :eek:

Naughty Nigel
18th January 2016, 04:55 PM
When I was at school doing O levels, just a few years back :), we were invited to submerge our hands in a bath of mercury - whilst no doubt inhaling mucuric oxide - the invitation being from a teacher!! God knows where he was taught to be a science teacher!!

My brother-in-law is Head of Science at a school in Newcastle. My mother-in-law had a problem with a fuse blowing, so her son, the Head of Science, rewired the fuse with a piece of wire from a coat hanger!

It didn't blow again but the main fuse did! :eek:

Thank goodness they don't let teachers loose in industry. :rolleyes:

Petrochemist
18th January 2016, 06:26 PM
Thank goodness they don't let teachers loose in industry. :rolleyes:
A few years back one of our chemists was an ex teacher. (He still works with the company but has moved out of the lab.) Not only is he in industry he organizes one of the local fireworks displays, having a budget in the region of 1-2k IIRC.

Fortunately he has more common sense than many teachers :)

Wee man
18th January 2016, 07:19 PM
Industry has its own teachers as the majority of teachers do not have the detailed knowledge of industrial practice in the same way industrial workers do not have the detailed knowledge for teaching. Today teaching targets are to pass academic examinations rather than teaching for employment or for educations sake?

Naughty Nigel
19th January 2016, 11:44 AM
Industry has its own teachers as the majority of teachers do not have the detailed knowledge of industrial practice in the same way industrial workers do not have the detailed knowledge for teaching. Today teaching targets are to pass academic examinations rather than teaching for employment or for educations sake?

Sadly all too true. :(

Harold Gough
19th January 2016, 06:15 PM
Some time ago we bought a stock of Everready 150W "Rough Service Lamps" light bulbs for use in our kitchen. Two which blew in succession, each after just a few weeks, each blew the downstairs lighting fuse.

Harold

Naughty Nigel
19th January 2016, 06:44 PM
Some time ago we bought a stock of Everready 150W "Rough Service Lamps" light bulbs for use in our kitchen. Two which blew in succession, each after just a few weeks, each blew the downstairs lighting fuse.

Harold

If the broken filament falls across the terminals inside the bulb it will trip the lighting circuit. That seems to be quite normal.

Harold Gough
19th January 2016, 07:04 PM
If the broken filament falls across the terminals inside the bulb it will trip the lighting circuit. That seems to be quite normal.

The filament would have to "fall" upwards. Maybe it curls.

Harold

Naughty Nigel
19th January 2016, 08:06 PM
The filament would have to "fall" upwards. Maybe it curls.

Harold

Maybe, but it seems that our lighting circuits nearly always trip when a light bulb fails.

It doesn't help that the modern circuit breakers are very sensitive to overcurrent loads. The old wired fuses would glow red for half an hour before they blew! :)

Naughty Nigel
20th January 2016, 09:35 PM
They say that a little bit of what you fancy does you good....................

Mind you, a little bit of Nicole Kidman could make me feel like a new man ...... :rolleyes:

Well, s'funny you should say that, but our daughter has presented us with a Davina McCall 'Keep Fit' DVD that she bought using my eVilbay account!

I will happily watch it, but whether I can do the Keep Fit bit is another matter - especially if she is wearing a 'combination' (I believe they are called leotards nowadays), or that rather fetching red outfit that she wore for Comic Relief. ;) :D :D :D