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View Full Version : Having my portrait taken tomorrow - UPDATE


Zuiko
15th January 2016, 01:00 AM
I'm used to being behind the camera but tomorrow I'm having my portrait taken, an X-ray of my hip to hopefully find out what the hell is wrong with it. I'll try to remember to smile for the camera. :D

Ross the fiddler
15th January 2016, 01:13 AM
Hope all goes well & you're still smiling. *yes

*chr

Grumpy Hec
15th January 2016, 06:45 AM
All the best John.

Hec

Phill D
15th January 2016, 07:11 AM
Best wishes from me too. Hope you weren't waiting too long.

Wee man
15th January 2016, 08:35 AM
Be careful or they will see through you, hope all goes well.

Kiwi Paul
15th January 2016, 09:03 AM
Be careful or they will see through you, hope all goes well.

Yes it sounds like an inside job to me! :D

All the best John.

Paul

IanB
15th January 2016, 10:50 AM
I'm used to being behind the camera but tomorrow I'm having my portrait taken, an X-ray of my hip to hopefully find out what the hell is wrong with it. I'll try to remember to smile for the camera. :D

may be made too long ago :D
hope all goes well

StephenL
15th January 2016, 11:04 AM
Make sure they shoot your best side! Good luck!

OM USer
15th January 2016, 11:06 AM
Hope all goes well.

Zuiko
15th January 2016, 11:54 AM
He he. I love the humour of you guys! :D

My visit got off to a bad start; at reception they informed me that the computers were down and the X-rays were having to be manually labelled, which was taking much longer than normal, so I could expect a long wait.

I took a seat and wondered if my crossword puzzle book would last long enough. Very soon they announced that everyone in the waiting area should move through to X-ray waiting room and, being very slow due to my sore hip, I was the last one to make it and I just caught the nurse who was collecting the referral forms before she disappeared. I was still settling into my new seat when my name was called - I couldn't believe I was first! I can only assume that they were working from the top of the pile of forms and, being last, mine was at the top. Within half an hour of my arrival at the hospital I was eating a cooked breakfast in their cafeteria!

I've now booked an appointment with my GP two weeks from today, to discuss the results.

Ross the fiddler
15th January 2016, 12:01 PM
Let's hope the result from the discussion of the results goes well then. *yes

Take care mate.

*chr

Zuiko
15th January 2016, 12:13 PM
Let's hope the result from the discussion of the results goes well then. *yes

Take care mate.

*chr

Thanks Ross, my hope is that there is something that can be done, and reasonably quickly, rather than it being something I just have to live with.

Graham_of_Rainham
15th January 2016, 01:48 PM
Keep your pants on or it could be X Rayted ;)

Hope all is as good as you'd wish for.

*chr

Imageryone
15th January 2016, 02:01 PM
He's only going to tell you to give up Acrobatic Skateboard and keep it on the pavement for a while :D:D:D:D:D

PS Hope the news is positive, John, thinking of you.

Naughty Nigel
15th January 2016, 05:01 PM
I took a seat and wondered if my crossword puzzle book would last long enough. Very soon they announced that everyone in the waiting area should move through to X-ray waiting room and, being very slow due to my sore hip, I was the last one to make it and I just caught the nurse who was collecting the referral forms before she disappeared. I was still settling into my new seat when my name was called - I couldn't believe I was first! I can only assume that they were working from the top of the pile of forms and, being last, mine was at the top. Within half an hour of my arrival at the hospital I was eating a cooked breakfast in their cafeteria!


You see, the first shall be last, and the last shall be first! *yes

I hope you get a positive outcome John. It's no fun hobbling around in pain when there are photographs to be taken. :)

martyjward
15th January 2016, 06:10 PM
Hope it's nowt to bad that can be fixed quickly and easily.

PeterBirder
15th January 2016, 07:57 PM
He he. I love the humour of you guys! :D

My visit got off to a bad start; at reception they informed me that the computers were down and the X-rays were having to be manually labelled, which was taking much longer than normal, so I could expect a long wait.

I took a seat and wondered if my crossword puzzle book would last long enough. Very soon they announced that everyone in the waiting area should move through to X-ray waiting room and, being very slow due to my sore hip, I was the last one to make it and I just caught the nurse who was collecting the referral forms before she disappeared. I was still settling into my new seat when my name was called - I couldn't believe I was first! I can only assume that they were working from the top of the pile of forms and, being last, mine was at the top. Within half an hour of my arrival at the hospital I was eating a cooked breakfast in their cafeteria!

I've now booked an appointment with my GP two weeks from today, to discuss the results.

Thanks for the tip on how to jump the queue, must remember that one.:D

Good you got a quick appointment, hope it leads quickly to a positive outcome.*yes

I'm still waiting for an appointment for my ultrasound scan (I guess that's because sound travels slower than X-rays:rolleyes: ) and hoping it doesn't reveal I'm expecting twins.

Regards.*chr

Zuiko
15th January 2016, 08:06 PM
Thanks for the tip on how to jump the queue, must remember that one.:D

Good you got a quick appointment, hope it leads quickly to a positive outcome.*yes

I'm still waiting for an appointment for my ultrasound scan (I guess that's because sound travels slower than X-rays:rolleyes: ) and hoping it doesn't reveal I'm expecting twins.

Regards.*chr

Nobody was more surprised than me that I got to the front of the queue, I actually got quite flustered!

Twins would certainly be a life-changing experience for you, Peter. :D I hope you have the scan before too long.

Wee man
15th January 2016, 08:13 PM
Just me as usual, you went to the cafeteria and then made an appointment to talk to you doctor?

Hope all goes well and quickly.

Mrs T
15th January 2016, 08:16 PM
Nice queue jumping tactics!

Zuiko
15th January 2016, 08:23 PM
Just me as usual, you went to the cafeteria and then made an appointment to talk to you doctor?

Hope all goes well and quickly.

Gotta get your priorities right! :D

I made the appointment online when I got home. :)

Wee man
15th January 2016, 08:29 PM
I thought you made the appointment due to what you had in the cafeteria!

Bill Gordon
16th January 2016, 12:57 AM
Don't move...you might break the camera!!

Cheers and hope that all goes well with the X-rays..yes plural because they always take many more....I know!!

pandora
16th January 2016, 04:51 AM
I bet you got black looks from the other patients when you were called first, John !

Anyways, hopefully all goes well for you and that your hip is operable and can be done soon.

If not, then I suggest you try one of them new fangled Hoverboard thingys *chr

maccabeej
16th January 2016, 09:12 AM
Missed this yesterday. Hope all goes well John.

Zuiko
16th January 2016, 10:11 AM
I thought you made the appointment due to what you had in the cafeteria!

Ha ha, sorry Ed - I was a bit slow on the uptake for that one! :D

Zuiko
16th January 2016, 10:27 AM
I bet you got black looks from the other patients when you were called first, John !

Anyways, hopefully all goes well for you and that your hip is operable and can be done soon.

If not, then I suggest you try one of them new fangled Hoverboard thingys *chr

I did feel rather sheepish, I was at the end of the line and had to hobble slowly past all of them! :o

Me on a hoverboard? :eek: I'd be a danger to myself and all those around me! :D

Zuiko
16th January 2016, 10:29 AM
Don't move...you might break the camera!!

Cheers and hope that all goes well with the X-rays..yes plural because they always take many more....I know!!

You're right, Bill, they took the other hip as well, just for comparison, and several shots of each. :)

Bikie John
16th January 2016, 11:58 AM
You're right, Bill, they took the other hip as well, just for comparison, and several shots of each. :)

Typical, digital has made us all "spray and pray" shooters.....

John

ringneck
16th January 2016, 10:01 PM
Hope they find something that will get you sorted John.......

I have to go for an EEG on Tuesday...the one where they stick all the probes on the head...should last and hour.
Then on the 30th its off to have a 48hour Heart monitor fitted - returning 2 days later for it to be removed.
Hopefully they will find something positive (or negative depending how you look at it) and tell me whats wrong.
I passed out while on the M6 in October and its taken this long to get to this stage.

Naughty Nigel
16th January 2016, 10:03 PM
Hope they find something that will get you sorted John.......

I have to go for an EEG on Tuesday...the one where they stick all the probes on the head...should last and hour.
Then on the 30th its off to have a 48hour Heart monitor fitted - returning 2 days later for it to be removed.
Hopefully they will find something positive (or negative depending how you look at it) and tell me whats wrong.
I passed out while on the M6 in October and its taken this long to get to this stage.

Nasty! :eek:

You were lucky to come to a halt without serious harm. Or were you already stationary?

Wee man
16th January 2016, 10:11 PM
Enjoy the flashing lights that go with your EEG! Hope all goes well with the 48hr ECG.

ringneck
16th January 2016, 10:24 PM
Yes I was very lucky...one moment in middle lane then almighty noise and car was side on being pushed along slow lane by a Juggernaut....it kept slamming into me as its brakes were coming on and off all the time...i was just waiting for my car to turn over but we both came to a halt safely.
Had to declare to DLVA I had passed out and waiting to see how long I have to keep off the roads.Cant get out to take any pics unless on the bus.

Naughty Nigel
16th January 2016, 10:30 PM
Yes I was very lucky...one moment in middle lane then almighty noise and car was side on being pushed along slow lane by a Juggernaut....it kept slamming into me as its brakes were coming on and off all the time...i was just waiting for my car to turn over but we both came to a halt safely.


Lucky indeed. A good cure for constipation as well I would imagine. :)

Zuiko
16th January 2016, 11:46 PM
Hope they find something that will get you sorted John.......

I have to go for an EEG on Tuesday...the one where they stick all the probes on the head...should last and hour.
Then on the 30th its off to have a 48hour Heart monitor fitted - returning 2 days later for it to be removed.
Hopefully they will find something positive (or negative depending how you look at it) and tell me whats wrong.
I passed out while on the M6 in October and its taken this long to get to this stage.

Sorry to hear this, Keith, it's rather worrying that you passed out on the M6. I know what you mean by hoping they find something; it's far worse if, despite all your problems, they find nothing! That's my big fear.

Good luck and I hope you are easily cured. *chr

Zuiko
16th January 2016, 11:50 PM
Yes I was very lucky...one moment in middle lane then almighty noise and car was side on being pushed along slow lane by a Juggernaut....it kept slamming into me as its brakes were coming on and off all the time...i was just waiting for my car to turn over but we both came to a halt safely.
Had to declare to DLVA I had passed out and waiting to see how long I have to keep off the roads.Cant get out to take any pics unless on the bus.

That must have been terrifying, thank goodness you came to no harm.

Phill D
17th January 2016, 07:36 AM
That does sound like a pretty horrific ordeal Keith. Hope the tests are less traumatic and they sort out the issue.

sapper
17th January 2016, 07:55 AM
Hope things turn out good for you Keith.
I too am having my portrait taken, tomorrow. And now have to take laxatives all day, so guess where the camera is going in the morning:eek:
I had this procedure a couple of years ago, might have mentioned it on here, the hospital used Oly cameras, which gave me a talking point with the operator. Looking forward to tomorrow afternoon, when it will be all over.

Imageryone
17th January 2016, 09:33 AM
Best of treatment, Keith, I know how worrying these days are, the mind plays nasty tricks of imagination, and a final diagnosis is, when it comes, welcome.

Wee man
17th January 2016, 10:42 AM
Lucky escape Keith, Dave been there they may use the new 300 with you. Ouch! Hope all goes well for both of you.

Zuiko
17th January 2016, 12:03 PM
Hope things turn out good for you Keith.
I too am having my portrait taken, tomorrow. And now have to take laxatives all day, so guess where the camera is going in the morning:eek:
I had this procedure a couple of years ago, might have mentioned it on here, the hospital used Oly cameras, which gave me a talking point with the operator. Looking forward to tomorrow afternoon, when it will be all over.

Hmmm, As I know, it's not pleasant and you have my sympathy. At least you know what to expect, having had it done before. Good luck and, most important, I hope the results are good.

ringneck
17th January 2016, 01:23 PM
Thanks everyone for the best wishes...sorry John for high-jacking your post.

The passing out came as a final thing for the year as I have been having a terrible time with all sorts of problems....pains all over - terrible sciatica - 2 frozen shoulders etc etc, all of which had made it so hard to work and getting there worse.I was going to work when I passed out.As well as that I was consistently feeling nauseous and tired.
The only diagnosis was ....OLD AGE...ha ha.
I scoffed at this at first but think it could be right...my body has just had enough...I have noticed so many people who seem to have the same problems as me since I can only get about by walking and on the bus and get time to study them. Walking is a good thing because sitting around just makes everything worse.But when I have managed to get out with the camera the walk there is O.K. but standing and actually taking th pics brings on the back pain.
Cant get to work at the moment as no car and I retire in July 2017 but that seems a long way off at the moment.

Hope everyone attending hospital/clinics get a positive outcome.

Naughty Nigel
17th January 2016, 01:40 PM
Thanks everyone for the best wishes...sorry John for high-jacking your post.

The passing out came as a final thing for the year as I have been having a terrible time with all sorts of problems....pains all over - terrible sciatica - 2 frozen shoulders etc etc, all of which had made it so hard to work and getting there worse.I was going to work when I passed out.As well as that I was consistently feeling nauseous and tired.
The only diagnosis was ....OLD AGE...ha ha.
I scoffed at this at first but think it could be right...my body has just had enough...I have noticed so many people who seem to have the same problems as me since I can only get about by walking and on the bus and get time to study them. Walking is a good thing because sitting around just makes everything worse.But when I have managed to get out with the camera the walk there is O.K. but standing and actually taking th pics brings on the back pain.

I actually wonder if you might be suffering form some kind of food intolerance. There are certain foods that seem to cause or exacerbate joint pain and arthritic conditions, which may also explain the feelings of nausea. Anything that makes it difficult to move around will make you tired too.

Anyhow, I hope everyone gets their various ailments sorted soon. :)

OM USer
17th January 2016, 03:40 PM
Hope all goes well Keith.

Zuiko
18th January 2016, 10:19 AM
Thanks everyone for the best wishes...sorry John for high-jacking your post.

The passing out came as a final thing for the year as I have been having a terrible time with all sorts of problems....pains all over - terrible sciatica - 2 frozen shoulders etc etc, all of which had made it so hard to work and getting there worse.I was going to work when I passed out.As well as that I was consistently feeling nauseous and tired.
The only diagnosis was ....OLD AGE...ha ha.
I scoffed at this at first but think it could be right...my body has just had enough...I have noticed so many people who seem to have the same problems as me since I can only get about by walking and on the bus and get time to study them. Walking is a good thing because sitting around just makes everything worse.But when I have managed to get out with the camera the walk there is O.K. but standing and actually taking th pics brings on the back pain.
Cant get to work at the moment as no car and I retire in July 2017 but that seems a long way off at the moment.

Hope everyone attending hospital/clinics get a positive outcome.

No worries from me about hijacking the post, Keith, I'm sure we are all greatly concerned by your misfortunes. With chronic, ongoing health problems the financial implications are often overlooked. It's bad enough constantly feeling ill or in great pain, but it becomes much worse when you have to worry about what will happen when you are unable to work. Sympathy from your employers only extends so far, even with the best of them, and contrary to popular public opinion the DWP do not make it easy to claim benefits. It seems that the people with the most genuine needs get the least amount of help. You really have my sympathy, Keith, and I hope things work out as well for you as they possibly can.

Zuiko
29th January 2016, 02:48 PM
I saw my doctor today and the X-Rays confirm joint damage plus a bone cyst in the left hip. She is going to refer me for surgical assessment, but I will not get an appointment for several months. The X-Ray of my right hip also revealed wear and tear, plus a bone deformity that is preventing the joint from working exactly as it should and will probably cause problems in the future. So great, I have that to look forward to as well - and I thought the right hip was my good one! Still, if it's been like that since I stopped growing and I've never noticed it, I'm not going to start worrying about it now! The main thing is that progress is being made with my sore hip - much as I dread surgery (I'm a coward!) it's got to be better than the constant pain I have at the moment. :)

Kiwi Paul
29th January 2016, 03:35 PM
All the best John, I hope it all works out for in a timely manner.

Paul

Wee man
29th January 2016, 04:02 PM
John glad your results are back hope you are seen very soon to let you decide the way forward.

PeterBirder
29th January 2016, 04:14 PM
Hi John.
Sorry it seems that you may have to wait so long to get the problem fixed now you know what it is. Hopefully your lucky experience with the X-ray appointment will hold and give a quicker result.

I have to go for my ultrasound scan at the local community hospital a week tomorrow. Given the Government's claims that the NHS virtually shuts down at weekends I was rather surprised to get an outpatient appointment at 4.30pm on a Saturday.:eek: Fortunately my suspected hernia seems to have setled down a lot so I am more hopeful I will able to live with it rather than having to have surgery again.

Take care.*chr

Naughty Nigel
30th January 2016, 12:05 AM
Pleased to hear that you have a diagnosis John, and that it can be fixed.

I don't think any of us enjoy hospitals, operations or the dentist (yes I'm a coward too!), but when it comes to it the long term gain is so much greater than the short term pain that it all becomes worth it. And at least you'll be able to walk without pain and enjoy the great outdoors more than at present.

Let's just hope you get a cancellation so that it can all be resolved that bit quicker. :)

Ross the fiddler
30th January 2016, 12:14 AM
Wishing you well for the upcoming procedures & here's hoping it can happen sooner rather later for you. I'm a big chicken too (I just have to 'brave up' myself & get back to the dentist for needed work), but if it gives you the longer term mobility without pain then it has to be worth it (I'll try to remember that for myself if I have to go in that route, which is possible at some point in the more distant future).

*chr

sapper
30th January 2016, 08:20 AM
Yes, all the best for the future John. Hope the surgery comes sooner than later.

Imageryone
30th January 2016, 09:37 AM
Hopefully all will happen sooner, rather than later. After last year's small emergency, surgery doesn't worry me like it used to. Just think of all those pretty young nurses fussing over you :rolleyes::rolleyes:

Wee man
30th January 2016, 09:55 AM
To say nothing of the food!

DerekW
30th January 2016, 11:38 AM
You can look forward to the hallucinations that you may get in the first day or so after the op.

Zuiko
30th January 2016, 07:56 PM
Hi John.
Sorry it seems that you may have to wait so long to get the problem fixed now you know what it is. Hopefully your lucky experience with the X-ray appointment will hold and give a quicker result.

I have to go for my ultrasound scan at the local community hospital a week tomorrow. Given the Government's claims that the NHS virtually shuts down at weekends I was rather surprised to get an outpatient appointment at 4.30pm on a Saturday.:eek: Fortunately my suspected hernia seems to have setled down a lot so I am more hopeful I will able to live with it rather than having to have surgery again.

Take care.*chr

Hope your scan goes okay and glad to hear that the hernia is feeling better, I can appreciate why you want to avoid surgery if possible.

I've learned that you cannot always believe what a government minister says. ;) In the case of the NHS they seem to have a hidden agenda for showing the service in a bad light and highlighting the areas of poor performance that suit them. I don't pretend to understand all the issues, but I do believe that junior doctors are in general a bunch of dedicated professionals who consider their career is also a vocation. They are not like 1970s dockers or British Leyland shop stewards and if they feel compelled to strike I take it as a sign that something is very, very wrong with Government policy.

I was both saddened and alarmed to hear last week that my old GP practice in Chelmsford is due to close because all four doctors have had enough and have given their notice to quit in June.

As for the probable lengthy wait for my surgery, yes it is frustrating but at least I will eventually get it done. If I was living in America in my current financial situation it is unlikely that I would have been able to keep up my private insurance and in all probability I would be doomed to suffer indefinitely, with no hope of a cure.

Where I do feel the service could be speeded up is in communications and referrals between departments. For example, now I have discussed the X-Ray results with my doctor she is going to write to the surgical team at the local hospital, asking them to make an appointment and advise me by post. This part of the procedure is likely to take about two weeks. Why couldn't she have picked up the phone and called the surgical team's admin staff to book an appointment whilst I was with her? It might seem like one more thing for a busy doctor to do, but providing the call was answered promptly it should take no longer than dictating or typing a letter and it would save time at the other department, too. To take it a step further, if doctors had online access to the hospital appointments system they could book a suitable appointment for their patient with a click of the mouse.

In case this sounds like a rant I must point out that I am grateful for the service that I am receiving and have nothing but praise for my local GP practice, it's just that by logical observation I cannot help but notice relatively minor improvements that could be made within the NHS as a whole. :)

Zuiko
30th January 2016, 08:09 PM
Pleased to hear that you have a diagnosis John, and that it can be fixed.

I don't think any of us enjoy hospitals, operations or the dentist (yes I'm a coward too!), but when it comes to it the long term gain is so much greater than the short term pain that it all becomes worth it. And at least you'll be able to walk without pain and enjoy the great outdoors more than at present.

Let's just hope you get a cancellation so that it can all be resolved that bit quicker. :)

That's funny, I have a fear of hospitals and operations but no concerns at all about visiting my dentist, other than a fear of how much it is going to cost! :eek:

I guess I've had so much work done on my teeth over the years that I've got used to it and put my faith in Novocaine, which is a wonderful thing. I could do with a shot of it in my hip right now - I wonder if my dentist could be persuaded? :D

Zuiko
30th January 2016, 08:13 PM
Hopefully all will happen sooner, rather than later. After last year's small emergency, surgery doesn't worry me like it used to. Just think of all those pretty young nurses fussing over you :rolleyes::rolleyes:

Hmmm, I'm not sure if pretty, young nurses are a good idea, I would imagine there will be enough swelling in the groin area immediately following a hip replacement operation! :rolleyes:

Naughty Nigel
30th January 2016, 11:29 PM
Hope your scan goes okay and glad to hear that the hernia is feeling better, I can appreciate why you want to avoid surgery if possible.

I've learned that you cannot always believe what a government minister says. ;) In the case of the NHS they seem to have a hidden agenda for showing the service in a bad light and highlighting the areas of poor performance that suit them. I don't pretend to understand all the issues, but I do believe that junior doctors are in general a bunch of dedicated professionals who consider their career is also a vocation. They are not like 1970s dockers or British Leyland shop stewards and if they feel compelled to strike I take it as a sign that something is very, very wrong with Government policy.

I was both saddened and alarmed to hear last week that my old GP practice in Chelmsford is due to close because all four doctors have had enough and have given their notice to quit in June.

As for the probable lengthy wait for my surgery, yes it is frustrating but at least I will eventually get it done. If I was living in America in my current financial situation it is unlikely that I would have been able to keep up my private insurance and in all probability I would be doomed to suffer indefinitely, with no hope of a cure.

Where I do feel the service could be speeded up is in communications and referrals between departments. For example, now I have discussed the X-Ray results with my doctor she is going to write to the surgical team at the local hospital, asking them to make an appointment and advise me by post. This part of the procedure is likely to take about two weeks. Why couldn't she have picked up the phone and called the surgical team's admin staff to book an appointment whilst I was with her? It might seem like one more thing for a busy doctor to do, but providing the call was answered promptly it should take no longer than dictating or typing a letter and it would save time at the other department, too. To take it a step further, if doctors had online access to the hospital appointments system they could book a suitable appointment for their patient with a click of the mouse.

In case this sounds like a rant I must point out that I am grateful for the service that I am receiving and have nothing but praise for my local GP practice, it's just that by logical observation I cannot help but notice relatively minor improvements that could be made within the NHS as a whole. :)

The NHS is undoubtedly a fantastic organisation, but it has become a political footfall which has grown far beyond what it was originally set up to do and as such is a victim of its own success.

For as long as I can remember opposing political parties have competed with one another on promises of NHS spending; but this only seems to have resulted in monumental waste, bureaucracy and endless tiers of management, but not enough of the money spent where it really matters. This isn't helped by the 'spend it or lose it' budgeting system used throughout the public sector.

The introduction of targets and league tables in the NHS has done little to improve things; but then we already knew that from the education system. :(

I can only speak as a satisfied customer, but I certainly wouldn't say the NHS was understaffed. Indeed, my own experience is that there are plenty of staff, but there is little joined up thinking in how they are managed and engaged, or how they manage themselves.

As an example, in my own experience the nurse to patient ratio has always been more than adequate; but there is never any clear strategy when it comes to allocating those nurses to patients. This results in confusion and unacceptable delays in caring for some patients whilst others wish they could be left alone!

I have also seen NHS staff doing jobs that are completely unnecessary, and which they can get little fulfilment from. As an example, whenever I have attended our local hospital for a blood test the same lady takes my form, puts it in a box and gives me a raffle ticket for my place in the queue. That is all she ever does. Surely it would be in everybody's interests for NHS staff to be meaningfully employed rather than doing mind numbing jobs that could better be done by machine or self-service?

John's comments about the referral system are also extremely valid, as the whole process has become so grindingly slow and inefficient. Is it any wonder that so many people try to bypass this arcane (and frankly anal) system by turning up at A&E?

I can sort of see where the government coming from with regard to the NHS, but the government's approach seems to completely lose sight of the fact that NHS staff, like everybody else, value their weekends and family time, and also need time off.

Furthermore, I don't think the trades unions are necessarily helping in this matter. Just as with the education system the unions seem to constantly remind their members what a bad deal they have got, which can only be demotivating. (Many in the private sector receive far fewer rewards for their labours.)

Unfortunately the unions only seem to measure their success by the amount of money spent on the health service and staff numbers, which brings us round in a circle.

PeterBirder
31st January 2016, 12:00 AM
Hope your scan goes okay and glad to hear that the hernia is feeling better, I can appreciate why you want to avoid surgery if possible.

I've learned that you cannot always believe what a government minister says. ;) In the case of the NHS they seem to have a hidden agenda for showing the service in a bad light and highlighting the areas of poor performance that suit them. I don't pretend to understand all the issues, but I do believe that junior doctors are in general a bunch of dedicated professionals who consider their career is also a vocation. They are not like 1970s dockers or British Leyland shop stewards and if they feel compelled to strike I take it as a sign that something is very, very wrong with Government policy.

I was both saddened and alarmed to hear last week that my old GP practice in Chelmsford is due to close because all four doctors have had enough and have given their notice to quit in June.

As for the probable lengthy wait for my surgery, yes it is frustrating but at least I will eventually get it done. If I was living in America in my current financial situation it is unlikely that I would have been able to keep up my private insurance and in all probability I would be doomed to suffer indefinitely, with no hope of a cure.

Where I do feel the service could be speeded up is in communications and referrals between departments. For example, now I have discussed the X-Ray results with my doctor she is going to write to the surgical team at the local hospital, asking them to make an appointment and advise me by post. This part of the procedure is likely to take about two weeks. Why couldn't she have picked up the phone and called the surgical team's admin staff to book an appointment whilst I was with her? It might seem like one more thing for a busy doctor to do, but providing the call was answered promptly it should take no longer than dictating or typing a letter and it would save time at the other department, too. To take it a step further, if doctors had online access to the hospital appointments system they could book a suitable appointment for their patient with a click of the mouse.

In case this sounds like a rant I must point out that I am grateful for the service that I am receiving and have nothing but praise for my local GP practice, it's just that by logical observation I cannot help but notice relatively minor improvements that could be made within the NHS as a whole. :)

John, I share your opinion of junior doctors and GPs but yes there are not enough of them. There was a report on the news this evening that the BMA are sounding alarms over the shortage of doctors.The Government's response is that they are funding X thousand new doctors but of course the length of time it takes to train a doctor is longer than than the "life" of a parliament so it won't happen soon.:rolleyes:

I may be wrong but I think the process for making an appointment to see a consultant surgeon is, and needs to be more complex than ringing up the admin for the next available appointment. From memory (fading of course), when I had my previous hernia repair the GP was able to consult the local NHS IT system whilst I was with him and advise me of the available local hospitals for the procedure and their average waiting times so I could choose where to have it done. He then had to send my clinical details (which I believe is also done electronically) so that an initial assessment (triage ?) can be made to determine the clinical need and urgency and to allocate the case to an appropriate consultant surgeon available at the specified hospital. I believe it is important that the clinical information is transmitted in a direct, written and traceable form rather than a quick phone call to a "clerk" within a ten minute GP consultation. Actually from recent experience of trying to change an appointment if you ring the appointments department you usualy get an answer phone.:mad: Also of course consultant surgeons don't usually work in only one hospital. The chap who did my last op, which I had to wait some months for was based in Southend and spent one day a week at our local hospital for both consultations and operations, the anaesthetist similarly came from somewhere else. All these procedures take time but safety is an important factor in the process. It is frustrating but I can understand the need for it and accept that it is necessary for some people with more urgent or life threatening needs to be seen more speedily. With an ageing population and developments in medical science offering more opportunities to treat previously untreatable conditions it is difficult to see how things can be improved.

Sorry, this doesn't help your predicament but I think I can understand why you are in this situation.

Kind regards.

PeterBirder
31st January 2016, 12:17 AM
The NHS is undoubtedly a fantastic organisation, but it has become a political footfall which has grown far beyond what it was originally set up to do and as such is a victim of its own success.

I have also seen NHS staff doing jobs that are completely unnecessary, and which they can get little fulfilment from. As an example, whenever I have attended our local hospital for a blood test the same lady takes my form, puts it in a box and gives me a raffle ticket for my place in the queue. That is all she ever does.

.

Some very valid points Nigel.

At least our local arrangements for blood tests are better. We now have a choice of having most standard test samples taken at the GP's surgery by appontment with their own phlebotomist or going to the local day hospital. There you collect your own raffle ticket from a dispenser (like the ones at the supermarket deli counter) ,wait for your number to come up on the screen and give your form to the phlebotomist taking the sample.

Regards.*chr

Imageryone
31st January 2016, 10:32 AM
After 6 months of NHS care, I can only praise the dedication of the staff and the treatment, and courtesy , I have received in that period and can fully appreciate the pressures they work under.
If it were not for their professionalism and knowledge, I would not be here to write this, so, I for one, can only praise the whole system.
It is a pity that the Health Minister cannot, and will not, experience a similar situation, it would open his eyes.

Zuiko
31st January 2016, 11:53 AM
The NHS is undoubtedly a fantastic organisation, but it has become a political footfall which has grown far beyond what it was originally set up to do and as such is a victim of its own success.

For as long as I can remember opposing political parties have competed with one another on promises of NHS spending; but this only seems to have resulted in monumental waste, bureaucracy and endless tiers of management, but not enough of the money spent where it really matters. This isn't helped by the 'spend it or lose it' budgeting system used throughout the public sector.

The introduction of targets and league tables in the NHS has done little to improve things; but then we already knew that from the education system. :(

I can only speak as a satisfied customer, but I certainly wouldn't say the NHS was understaffed. Indeed, my own experience is that there are plenty of staff, but there is little joined up thinking in how they are managed and engaged, or how they manage themselves.

As an example, in my own experience the nurse to patient ratio has always been more than adequate; but there is never any clear strategy when it comes to allocating those nurses to patients. This results in confusion and unacceptable delays in caring for some patients whilst others wish they could be left alone!

I have also seen NHS staff doing jobs that are completely unnecessary, and which they can get little fulfilment from. As an example, whenever I have attended our local hospital for a blood test the same lady takes my form, puts it in a box and gives me a raffle ticket for my place in the queue. That is all she ever does. Surely it would be in everybody's interests for NHS staff to be meaningfully employed rather than doing mind numbing jobs that could better be done by machine or self-service?

John's comments about the referral system are also extremely valid, as the whole process has become so grindingly slow and inefficient. Is it any wonder that so many people try to bypass this arcane (and frankly anal) system by turning up at A&E?

I can sort of see where the government coming from with regard to the NHS, but the government's approach seems to completely lose sight of the fact that NHS staff, like everybody else, value their weekends and family time, and also need time off.

Furthermore, I don't think the trades unions are necessarily helping in this matter. Just as with the education system the unions seem to constantly remind their members what a bad deal they have got, which can only be demotivating. (Many in the private sector receive far fewer rewards for their labours.)

Unfortunately the unions only seem to measure their success by the amount of money spent on the health service and staff numbers, which brings us round in a circle.

Many good points here, Nigel. Perhaps what we need most is a cross-party consensus on the management and development of the NHS, with broadly similar long-term policies that have included input from the unions. We should also start to concentrate on the positives (of which there are many) of the NHS rather than dwell too much on the negatives; there has to be a feel-good factor if we are to get the best from the staff.

Zuiko
31st January 2016, 12:04 PM
John, I share your opinion of junior doctors and GPs but yes there are not enough of them. There was a report on the news this evening that the BMA are sounding alarms over the shortage of doctors.The Government's response is that they are funding X thousand new doctors but of course the length of time it takes to train a doctor is longer than than the "life" of a parliament so it won't happen soon.:rolleyes:

I may be wrong but I think the process for making an appointment to see a consultant surgeon is, and needs to be more complex than ringing up the admin for the next available appointment. From memory (fading of course), when I had my previous hernia repair the GP was able to consult the local NHS IT system whilst I was with him and advise me of the available local hospitals for the procedure and their average waiting times so I could choose where to have it done. He then had to send my clinical details (which I believe is also done electronically) so that an initial assessment (triage ?) can be made to determine the clinical need and urgency and to allocate the case to an appropriate consultant surgeon available at the specified hospital. I believe it is important that the clinical information is transmitted in a direct, written and traceable form rather than a quick phone call to a "clerk" within a ten minute GP consultation. Actually from recent experience of trying to change an appointment if you ring the appointments department you usualy get an answer phone.:mad: Also of course consultant surgeons don't usually work in only one hospital. The chap who did my last op, which I had to wait some months for was based in Southend and spent one day a week at our local hospital for both consultations and operations, the anaesthetist similarly came from somewhere else. All these procedures take time but safety is an important factor in the process. It is frustrating but I can understand the need for it and accept that it is necessary for some people with more urgent or life threatening needs to be seen more speedily. With an ageing population and developments in medical science offering more opportunities to treat previously untreatable conditions it is difficult to see how things can be improved.

Sorry, this doesn't help your predicament but I think I can understand why you are in this situation.

Kind regards.

Yes, that does make sense, Peter and I can appreciate that actual surgery needs to be prioritised based on patients with the most urgent need. Perhaps it is not possible to speed up the booking process for initial consultations, but it does seem a long-winded and complicated system just to get a date.

Graptolite
31st January 2016, 02:38 PM
The main thing is that progress is being made with my sore hip - much as I dread surgery (I'm a coward!) it's got to be better than the constant pain I have at the moment. :)

If you are offered a hip replacement then go for it John. I had a tin hip put in about 3 years ago and it has been literally a life changing event.
The surgery wasn't nearly as bad as I anticipated (I had a spinal anaesthetic) and the relief of pain was immediate. I had been severely restricted (almost housebound), unable to sleep, and permanently bad tempered. 6 months after the operation I was able to walk up to 7 miles without pain, I was sleeping like a baby, and I now have the temperament of a saint. O:)
Hip replacement is, in my book, one of the greatest advances in medicine of the past 50 years

*yes

DerekW
31st January 2016, 03:04 PM
A cousin of mine has had stem cells injected into the faulty area of his hip with the hope/intention/desire that the faulty damaged material will regrow.

It will take quite a while to get really well. I await reports of his progress eagerly.

Zuiko
31st January 2016, 03:58 PM
A cousin of mine has had stem cells injected into the faulty area of his hip with the hope/intention/desire that the faulty damaged material will regrow.

It will take quite a while to get really well. I await reports of his progress eagerly.

That's an interesting development. :)

Zuiko
31st January 2016, 04:11 PM
If you are offered a hip replacement then go for it John. I had a tin hip put in about 3 years ago and it has been literally a life changing event.
The surgery wasn't nearly as bad as I anticipated (I had a spinal anaesthetic) and the relief of pain was immediate. I had been severely restricted (almost housebound), unable to sleep, and permanently bad tempered. 6 months after the operation I was able to walk up to 7 miles without pain, I was sleeping like a baby, and I now have the temperament of a saint. O:)
Hip replacement is, in my book, one of the greatest advances in medicine of the past 50 years

*yes

Yes, it made a huge difference to my father and now I seem to be walking (or limping) in his footsteps. Joints are a problem in my family, as well as the hip Dad had a knee replacement and my sister has had both knees done.

Despite my fear of operations I will have the replacement, assuming it is offered, because like you say I cannot get out much and I am not sleeping due to the pain. Also it appears that I am one of those people who do not get much benefit from Codeine. I just cannot go on like this indefinitely. I will, however, beg for a general rather than local anaesthetic.

Wee man
31st January 2016, 05:53 PM
John paracetamol is my pain relief. I am allergic to codeine, morphine etc so IV paracetamol is it. I dread the day when surgery arrives for my bowel problems!!

Naughty Nigel
31st January 2016, 08:59 PM
Many good points here, Nigel. Perhaps what we need most is a cross-party consensus on the management and development of the NHS, with broadly similar long-term policies that have included input from the unions. We should also start to concentrate on the positives (of which there are many) of the NHS rather than dwell too much on the negatives; there has to be a feel-good factor if we are to get the best from the staff.


I quite agree. The NHS has changed all of our lives for the better in one way or another, and there is much to celebrate.

In my view the NHS and education are so vitally important that they should both be cross-party matters, and not used for political point scoring. It would also help if the respective unions were to concentrate on the welfare of their members and the services they provide rather than concerning themselves with parliamentary regime change.

Some very valid points Nigel.

At least our local arrangements for blood tests are better. We now have a choice of having most standard test samples taken at the GP's surgery by appontment with their own phlebotomist or going to the local day hospital. There you collect your own raffle ticket from a dispenser (like the ones at the supermarket deli counter) ,wait for your number to come up on the screen and give your form to the phlebotomist taking the sample.


I could give a blood sample at our local GP's surgery, but I have to book a week or so in advance which is not always convenient, especially for PSA tests, if you know what I mean. :)

However, our local hospital has a walk in blood sampling service where I can usually be seen to within ten minutes or so.

ringneck
5th February 2016, 04:09 PM
Many good points here, Nigel. Perhaps what we need most is a cross-party consensus on the management and development of the NHS, with broadly similar long-term policies that have included input from the unions. We should also start to concentrate on the positives (of which there are many) of the NHS rather than dwell too much on the negatives; there has to be a feel-good factor if we are to get the best from the staff.

Yes the NHS should be out of the political arena....and cross party/unions is the way to go BUT I'm sorry it will never happen as one certain party WILL declare it unmanageable and it will be split up and sold off and surprise surprise guess who will have fingers in all the various new firms running it.They have a history of doing this with all the old Gas ,Electric etc etc......

Graptolite
5th February 2016, 04:47 PM
....BUT I'm sorry it will never happen as one certain party WILL declare it unmanageable and it will be split up and sold off and surprise surprise guess who will have fingers in all the various new firms running it.They have a history of doing this with all the old Gas ,Electric etc etc......

Jeremy Hunt is on record as saying that the NHS should be privatised. Much of the current 'crisis' has the appearance of being deliberately manufactured in order to provide an excuse for the process of privatisation.
This is one time that I'm glad that the NHS in Scotland comes under the devolved powers of the Scottish Government - you can be sure that they will do the very opposite of whatever the current Westminster government does.

Zuiko
6th February 2016, 12:04 AM
Jeremy Hunt is on record as saying that the NHS should be privatised. Much of the current 'crisis' has the appearance of being deliberately manufactured in order to provide an excuse for the process of privatisation.
This is one time that I'm glad that the NHS in Scotland comes under the devolved powers of the Scottish Government - you can be sure that they will do the very opposite of whatever the current Westminster government does.

You are so lucky to live in Scotland, for any number of reasons. *chr

Ricoh
6th February 2016, 12:45 AM
...I could give a blood sample at our local GP's surgery, but I have to book a week or so in advance which is not always convenient, especially for PSA tests, if you know what I mean. :)
.

Lots of us have regular PSA tests, but I don't understand why you mentioned "convenience especially for PSA". I simply go to the GPs surgery and ask the receptionist to write the script; I tell her what to write on the form and normally get an appoltment within a week. My GP is happy for me to organise my own tests, I then phone up a few days later and check the figures. Two things I look out for are the absolute value and rate of change of PSA. Unless the rate of change is showing an increasing rate from previous tests, then a few weeks delay isn't going to be a life or death situation. But don't quote me or haunt me if I'm wrong!