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Graham_of_Rainham
11th January 2016, 05:31 PM
Ian posted this fitting tribute on Face Book...

https://youtu.be/KaOC9danxNo

Olybirder
11th January 2016, 06:09 PM
Definitely a fitting tribute recorded in the ultimate setting.

Pop stars come and go (with increasing regularity as I get older) but I was stunned when they announced David Bowie's death on the radio this morning. They have been playing his recordings all day and the number and variety of them is extraordinary. 'Lazarus' from his recently released album 'Blackstar' has become one of my favourite tracks since I first heard it and watching the video in light of today's news is extremely powerful stuff.

RIP David Bowie.

David Bowie - Lazarus - YouTube

Internaut
11th January 2016, 06:34 PM
The subject of many great portraits.

Yorkie
11th January 2016, 07:43 PM
A great loss to the world of music.

DerekW
11th January 2016, 08:28 PM
Interesting how the voices of Radio 4 were so affected today by Bowie's death, then you realise that they were of an impressionable age when Bowie was getting going ie teenagers in the 70's when music media was going full swing.

Whereas for my generation it was Richard Dimbleby as the voice of mementus events, his passing had this effect (but at a lesser volume)

benvendetta
11th January 2016, 08:42 PM
The Master of Reinvention. I was a Bowie fan from 1971 and saw him in his Hunky Dory/Ziggy Stardust guise in 1972.
Can't believe he's gone. In a little over 6 months we have lost Chris Squire (Yes), Lemmy (Motorhead), and now perhaps the biggest name in popular culture of the past 60 years.
RIP David.

Christoph
11th January 2016, 08:45 PM
At the risk of upsetting a few people on this forum, really , Buddy Holly, Elvis, Hendrix, Frank Sinatra, John Lennon, Nick Drake, Ian Dury, all inspirational in their own way, God forbid the day the master Bob Dylan should leave us, ps sorry I missed the wonderful mr Freddy Murcury off my list.

Naughty Nigel
11th January 2016, 08:55 PM
At the risk of upsetting a few people on this forum, really , Buddy Holly, Elvis, Hendrix, Frank Sinatra, John Lennon, Nick Drake, Ian Dury, all inspirational in their own way, God forbid the day the master Bob Dylan should leave us, ps sorry I missed the wonderful mr Freddy Murcury off my list.

All of these musicians have been very influential in their own way, and I suspect their music will still be familiar in 100 years time.

Whether they have the everlasting influence of (say) JS Bach, Handel or Mozart is another matter, but of course these composers wrote and performed completely different genres of music.

Christoph
11th January 2016, 08:57 PM
Sorry Freddie spelt your name wrong, have been to the pub, sincere apologies.

Christoph
11th January 2016, 09:21 PM
Good point Nigel, but I can still sing along with Buddy, 57 years after he past on, but I do like Bach man turner overdrive, if I'm being facetious i apologise.

Jim Ford
11th January 2016, 10:17 PM
All of these musicians have been very influential in their own way, and I suspect their music will still be familiar in 100 years time.

I very much doubt it!

Who can remember the pop sensations of the early 50s? Err - Johnny Ray, err, err? Popular music is ephemeral. Last years hits are stale this year.

Jim

Crazy Dave
11th January 2016, 11:13 PM
Just around the corner from our house, lived two absolutely beautiful girls. Across their chests they wore the embroidered name of Johnny Ray, I'll never forget him for the pleasure he generated! Didn't he sing Hernando's Hideaway?

David

Zuiko
12th January 2016, 02:54 AM
All of these musicians have been very influential in their own way, and I suspect their music will still be familiar in 100 years time.

Whether they have the everlasting influence of (say) JS Bach, Handel or Mozart is another matter, but of course these composers wrote and performed completely different genres of music.

That's an interesting question, but we will never know the answer! However, it occurs to me that there are relatively few classical composers still widely remembered today when you consider how long the genre has been established. There must be many classical composers from previous centuries who were popular at the time but long ago faded into obscurity.

I suspect it will be the same with the artists of today; Bowie remembered 100 years hence? Probably. Bieber? Probably not. Interestingly, in the case of my two favourite bands, I will say that Pink Floyd will almost certainly be remembered into the next century and beyond but Yes, probably not. That's no reflection upon the individual or collective musical skills of the latter, in fact Yes are probably superior to the Floyd in many ways, but Yes remained relatively obscure outside the progressive rock genre whereas Floyd gained more general and widespread recognition. As with Bowie, I heard about the sad death of Richard Wright either on the day or day after it happened. It shocked me to the core when I learned about the death of Chris Squire (extremely talented bass guitarist and founder member of Yes) about 6 months after it happened. How could one of my music heroes slip away like that without me even noticing? I guess the band have never gained the recognition they deserve outside of their discerning fan base and talent, innovation and creativity are not enough to ensure that your name, at least, will remain immortal.

Earlier in this post I wonder how many really talented classical composers have faded into undeserved obscurity over the centuries. Maybe not as many as I think, because they have the advantage of their music being performed by many orchestras etc, whereas today's bands tend to just play their own material. The exceptions are the burgeoning tribute bands that help perpetuate many of the older pop songs and bands like the Beatles, whose hits are regularly covered by other artists. I recently heard that "Yesterday" is the most covered pop song of all time, with literally thousands of performances.

Widely covered too is the work of the Bee Gees. You probably know far more pop standards composed by the Gibb brothers than you realise! Performers as diverse as Barbra Streisand, Diana Ross, Dolly Parton, Kenny Rogers, Glen Campbell, Backstreet Boys, Steps and Acker Bilk amongst many others have all enjoyed massive hits with Bee Gees compositions.

Advantages that modern musicians have over performers of all genres in the past are audio recordings, which have improved exponentially in quality since the early days of 78s and video, both of which are easily archived for future generations to enjoy.

So the question of whether classical or pop music has the greatest longevity remains unanswered, but we are fortunate to be amongst the first generations able to freely access and appreciate both genres. I am confident that this will continue well into the future and 100 years hence our descendants will be able to enjoy either Beethoven or Bowie, but maybe not Bieber!

Phill D
12th January 2016, 07:01 AM
Sad about Bowie but until I read this thread I didn't know about Chris Squire either John - as a Yes fan myself it's not a happy day. One of my regrets is I never got to see them live. Had an opportunity once but for some reason I can't now remember ended up not going!!!

drmarkf
12th January 2016, 09:56 AM
I saw Yes a couple of times back in the 1970s, but certainly regret never seeing Bowie.

On the other hand, I did see Chris Hatfield at the Eventim Apollo in the Brian Cox/Robin Ince show just before Christmas!

Putting aside his modest musical skills, he's a genuine All-Canadian hero and excellent science advocate and educator.

benvendetta
12th January 2016, 12:23 PM
Sad about Bowie but until I read this thread I didn't know about Chris Squire either John - as a Yes fan myself it's not a happy day. One of my regrets is I never got to see them live. Had an opportunity once but for some reason I can't now remember ended up not going!!!

Only saw Yes once in 1969 (yes, aeons ago!) but can still remember the towering figure of Chris Squire above me on the stage. Interesting to note that arguably the two most prominent users of the classic Rickenbacker bass (gorgeous instrument) in rock music have died in the past 6 months (Chris Squire and Lemmy).

Sad times indeed.

cariadus
12th January 2016, 01:52 PM
The subject of many great portraits.

This probably being the most iconic photo of him:
http://www.duffyphotographer.com/product/aladdin-sane/

Saw Yes in 1979 at Wembely on a rotating stage. Really wish I'd got to see Bowie, especially in the Ziggy Stardust days.

Zuiko
12th January 2016, 04:11 PM
I saw Yes at the Rainbow in 1972 and 1973 for the Close To The Edge and Tales From Topographic Oceans tours respectively. As the years passed I never thought I'd see them live again but in 2004 I happened to spot an advert in our local paper for a gig at Towerlands Equestrian Centre near Braintree, hardly 10 miles away! It was the classic line up of Anderson, Howe, Squire, Wakeman and White, who treated a rapturous audience of old, fat, balding one-time hippies to around two and a half hours of the old favourites, a gloriously memorable evening.

I do regret never seeing Bowie live, but I can hardly claim to be a fan. His music was always there, evolving with the decades as he constantly reinvented himself whilst remaining an icon and I suppose I rather took him for granted. In fact, I didn't own any of his albums until I bought the Best Of Bowie double CD a couple of years ago, a mere sample of his wealth of talent and extraordinary creativity. I am still shocked and saddened by his passing, though, and his contribution to popular music over the past six decades cannot be overestimated. A legend who will never be forgotten.

Naughty Nigel
12th January 2016, 04:50 PM
That's an interesting question, but we will never know the answer! However, it occurs to me that there are relatively few classical composers still widely remembered today when you consider how long the genre has been established. There must be many classical composers from previous centuries who were popular at the time but long ago faded into obscurity.

So the question of whether classical or pop music has the greatest longevity remains unanswered, but we are fortunate to be amongst the first generations able to freely access and appreciate both genres. I am confident that this will continue well into the future and 100 years hence our descendants will be able to enjoy either Beethoven or Bowie, but maybe not Bieber!

Classical music is more of a 'niche' interest, so whilst there are many composers who have disappeared into obscurity there are many other 'little known' composers whose music is still performed and enjoyed by specialists and enthusiasts of that particular genre.

At the risk of going well off topic I would say the greatest danger to classical music is certain classical radio stations which pump out the same 'top 40' classical excerpts almost every hour of the day (in the interests of listening figures and advertising revenue) whilst ignoring many other perfectly worthy works.

Charles-Marie Widor, for example, is best known for the final movement of his fifth symphony (the Toccata), which is played ad nauseam by said radio station, but he wrote a large number of other works which are rarely if ever heard, including a wonderful Adagio which precedes the Toccata.

The works of CÚsar Franck and Louis Vierne are probably more highly regarded than most of Widor's compositions, and are certainly performed very regularly around the country, but they are rarely broadcast anywhere.

DekHog
12th January 2016, 06:07 PM
I'm late to this party, but can't remember feeling as robbed as I did yesterday when I found out about his death..... I felt like somone had stolen my teenage years from me. For people of a certain age, and the music industry in general, the musical equivalent of the E-M5; a game-changer...... RIP David Bowie.