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View Full Version : *EATING IN THE FIFTIES* . . . . . . that's the 1950's. . . . !!


Barr1e
14th December 2015, 10:08 PM
*EATING IN THE FIFTIES* . . . . . . that's the 1950's. . . . !!


Pasta was not eaten in England.

Curry was a surname.

A take-away was a mathematical problem.

A pizza was something to do with a leaning tower.

All potato crisps were plain; the only choice we had was

whether to put the salt on or not.

Rice was only eaten as a milk pudding.

Calamari was called squid and we used it as fish bait.

A Big Mac was what we wore when it was raining.

Brown bread was something only poor people ate.

Oil was for lubricating, fat was for cooking.

Tea was made in a teapot using tea leaves and never green.

Sugar enjoyed a good press in those days, and was regarded as being white gold. Cubed sugar was regarded as posh.

Fish didn't have fingers in those days.

Eating raw fish was called poverty, not sushi.

None of us had ever heard of yoghurt.

Healthy food consisted of anything edible.

People who didn't peel potatoes were regarded as lazy.

Indian restaurants were only found in India.

Cooking outside was called camping.

Seaweed was not a recognised food.

"Kebab" was not even a word, never mind a food.

Prunes were medicinal.

Surprisingly, muesli was readily available, it was called cattle feed.

Water came out of the tap. If someone had suggested bottling it and

charging more than petrol for it​, ​ they would have become a laughing stock!!

The one thing that we never ever had on our table in the fifties .....

"Elbows Or Phones." ! ! ! !

PeterBirder
14th December 2015, 10:23 PM
Ooh! nostalgia.

This provokes so many memories of such happy uncomplicated days.

Regards.*chr

DerekW
14th December 2015, 11:06 PM
Olive oil was warmed and dripped into the ear of a person who had ear ache. The oil was bought at the chemist's.

Crazy Dave
14th December 2015, 11:26 PM
Ah - happy days, food parcels from Canada and dried egg. While I'm here, has any one been to M & S recently? In olden days, 99% of their wares were made in Britain and one bought underwear, socks, shirts and suits, I even bought a DJ there. Fast forward to last week. SWMBO and I went to an out of town M& S waiting for our dog to come round after an anesthetic. Apart from being the biggest load of tat seen in a long time, it was like being in a dimly light aircraft hanger - a truly diabolical experience.

We couldn't get out fast enough. Do the people who run these companies ever leave their ivory towers and see for themselves why they are struggling?

David

PS just to prove I'm not always a grumpy g*t, on Sunday, I shopped in a branch of Cass Art. Good range, knowledgeable and very helpful staff, great experience.

Wee man
14th December 2015, 11:28 PM
Milk came from cows or other mammals, soya, rice & almond milk had not been dreamt up yet.

ringneck
14th December 2015, 11:46 PM
FIFTIES....what do you mean FIFTIES.........almost all of them apply today for me..........if it sounds foreign its crap...YUK...ha ha

Zuiko
15th December 2015, 12:07 AM
Pig's trotters were a treat for supper.

Fish & chips came with a free newspaper.

Babycham was a favourite drink with the ladies, or bitter lemon if they wanted something non alcoholic.

Lager was a drink that was always served with a dash of lime cordial.

Food rationing was very much a reality in 1949, the year that my parents got married. The eggs needed to make their wedding cake were sent from my Mum's uncle in Canada, packed in a box of flour that was also used for the cake.

Ice cream was vanilla, strawberry, chocolate, Neapolitan or raspberry ripple.

A pub lunch was a packet of crisps, with or without the salt.

A buffet was sandwiches, cheese or ham.

The average keen amateur photographer would use a Kodak Retina, Agfa Silette or Ilford Sportsman.

Motorway services didn't exist, neither did motorways

Internaut
15th December 2015, 12:15 AM
Hey - I remember eating in the 70s. It wasn't much better. The first time I had mint-choc-chip ice cream was a revelation. And don't get me started on my mum's mashed potatoes!

Zuiko
15th December 2015, 12:49 AM
Hey - I remember eating in the 70s. It wasn't much better. The first time I had mint-choc-chip ice cream was a revelation. And don't get me started on my mum's mashed potatoes!

I seem to recall that in the 1970s our food was becoming quite sophisticated; we had Coq Au Vin for dinner parties and pubs were serving scampi or chicken and chips in a basket, all washed down with a bottle of Blue Nun. One was regarded as rather refined if one knew that the wine was a Liebfraumilch and there was even greater kudos if you knew how to spell and pronounce it correctly.

pandora
15th December 2015, 07:57 AM
Ooh! nostalgia.

This provokes so many memories of such happy uncomplicated days.

Regards.*chr
It certainly does, Peter.

And back then DSLR was just an anagram for Democrats, Socialists, Luddites & Republicans, wasn't it :confused:

I'm leaving! *chr

Kiwi Paul
15th December 2015, 08:13 AM
In 50 years time these will be the "good ole days" :rolleyes::eek:*yes

Paul

Crazy Dave
15th December 2015, 08:30 AM
Did anyone else make honeycomb? In the fifties as kids we used to come home from school (ravenous) and make it with Tate & Lyle syrup, baking powder, probably water. Boil it in a saucepan and wait to cool. The exact recipe is lost in my grey cells.

David

Bikie John
15th December 2015, 09:54 AM
Babycham was a favourite drink with the ladies,

There was a lovely quirky TV programme a couple of years ago called "The Rules of Drinking" about how the styles, conventions and manners have changed over the years. They interviewed a woman who had run a pub for years in a rough part of Glasgow, and needless to say she had a great fund of stories. One was that when her customers fancied being sophisticated they would drink brandy & Babycham, with the inevitable consequence that "They would forget their own names and start speaking in Spanish".

I have spent three years in evening classes trying to learn Spanish. Perhaps I should have gone to her pub instead *chr

John

Olybirder
15th December 2015, 10:37 AM
In the '50s chicken was something that we only ate at Christmas. My aunt's neighbour Mrs Jolly always kept a capon for us. I didn't try turkey until my mid teens!

Malt extract and cod liver oil were apparently a cure for every malady known to man. I still sometimes have a craving for plain malt extract though.

I remember going to junior school (on foot of course) with a packed lunch of white sugar sandwiches and occasionally a sandwich of 2 Rich Tea biscuits with a slice of cheese between them. Very odd.

Every Wednesday my mum would go to the International Stores in Norwich and place her grocery order. I can remember being fascinated by the bacon slicers and shelves full of provisions behind the counter. She would then buy some fish from the market - it was the only day of the week when we ate fish - and return home. Later that day a cardboard box filled with groceries would be delivered as if by magic. I believe today's supermarkets have now cottoned onto this service.

Vegetables were purchased from the back of Mr Sadler's lorry which turned up every week. Bottles of Corona pop were delivered every couple of weeks and I remember feeling very grown up drinking the Cydapple flavour.

Ron

Wee man
15th December 2015, 11:04 AM
Anyone else remember coal brick?

OM USer
15th December 2015, 11:16 AM
Returning your empty (glass) lemonade or tizer bottles for the refund.

Zuiko
15th December 2015, 11:28 AM
Returning your empty (glass) lemonade or tizer bottles for the refund.

Yes, we used to walk around the local park at the end of the day collecting the empties that other people couldn't be bothered to return. We took them to the corner shop and swapped them for bags of black jacks and fruit salad chews or sherbet fountains.

Naughty Nigel
15th December 2015, 11:29 AM
...... all washed down with a bottle of Blue Nun. One was regarded as rather refined if one knew that the wine was a Liebfraumilch and there was even greater kudos if you knew how to spell and pronounce it correctly.

Or a bottle of Concorde for those who were 'upwardly mobile' but had no taste :D


I can remember being fascinated by the bacon slicers and shelves full of provisions behind the counter.

I still love the smell of freshly cut ham. It tastes wonderful in crusty white bread with real butter and a piece of real Cheddar cheese. Yum!

(I think I have just made myself hungry. :D )

I can remember International Stores, whoever they became? We lived in a small village with just one grocery store. Mr Collis the Grocer used to deliver in his own car on occasions, and would put everything on the slate until the end of the week.

I also remember the old J. Sainsbury's store in Guildford, which I recall was a long, narrow shop with marble walls and floors, or perhaps the walls were tiled. There were refrigerated glass cabinets on both sides of the store, attended to by ladies dressed in white coats and hats.

There was only one 'supermarket' as such (Fine Fare) which always seemed very busy. Then Tesco came along, and they gave out Green Shield Stamps, which I used to enjoy sticking the book, but could never see how we could collect enough to buy that Ford Escort, which if I recall cost 977 books! :D


Food rationing was very much a reality in 1949, the year that my parents got married. The eggs needed to make their wedding cake were sent from my Mum's uncle in Canada, packed in a box of flour that was also used for the cake.

My parents were married in 1941. I remember my mother telling me that she queued up with a handful of ration books to buy tomatoes on her wedding morning, and that friends and relatives brought other provisions. Once married they kept chickens at home so they had to give up their egg rations!

Looking back we didn't have a particularly interesting or healthy diet in the UK. I'm sure our intake of the red meat, butter, salt, chips cooked in beef fat and so forth would have clogged everyone's arteries, but allergies such as Asthma and Coeliac were unheard of, and even Hay Fever was unusual.

Naughty Nigel
15th December 2015, 11:31 AM
Returning your empty (glass) lemonade or tizer bottles for the refund.

I can remember finding a Soda Syphon on my way home from school, which I took to the Off Licence and was given 7/6d for. *yes

Naughty Nigel
15th December 2015, 11:45 AM
Anyone else remember coal brick?

Yes I do. There was also Anthracite (which stank) and Ovoids.

Both coal bricks and Ovoids were types of 'smokeless' fuel, and were by-products of town gas production. Anthracite wasn't' smokeless by any stretch of the imagination, but produced a lot of heat; hence its use in some steam locomotives.

Welsh Nuts and Nutty Slack were other types of coal that I remember.

We had a large coal store under our house. My father used to order two and a half tons during the summer when it was cheapest, which used to last most of the year.

Much of the UK's chemical industry revolved around coal and gas production from the early 20th century until natural gas came along in the late 1960's. Indeed, Gas Board showrooms sold proper Creosote and fertiliser (both by-products of town gas production) if you asked for them.

byegad
15th December 2015, 11:53 AM
My abiding memory of food in the 1950s was that minced beef had bits of badly ground bone in it.

Naughty Nigel
15th December 2015, 11:59 AM
Petrol was 5/- a Gallon (four gallons for £1) until about 1965.

And there were yet more Green Shield Stamps! :D

Imageryone
15th December 2015, 01:47 PM
" Coke " was a smokeless fuel, and you would never dream of sniffing it :D
Bacon came wrapped in muslin and covered in salt, as did Kippers.
Cheese was on ration as a staple, not a luxury food as now.

Growing up in the country, our diet included Rabbit, Hare, Horse Mushrooms, Pheasant, Pigeon and a good dose of D.D.T.. I remember the fields white with the stuff, and we used to play in them :eek::eek:

Bikie John
15th December 2015, 02:24 PM
Yes, we used to walk around the local park at the end of the day collecting the empties that other people couldn't be bothered to return. We took them to the corner shop and swapped them for bags of black jacks and fruit salad chews or sherbet fountains.

According to yesterday's Guardian, Irn Bru, one of the last bastions of returnable bottles, are stopping at the end of the year:

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/shortcuts/2015/dec/13/cash-in-your-glass-cheques-the-end-of-the-irn-bru-buy-back-scheme-is-nigh

John

Wee man
15th December 2015, 03:07 PM
Horse and cart every other week selling Ardglass Herring.

Naughty Nigel
15th December 2015, 03:23 PM
" Coke " was a smokeless fuel, and you would never dream of sniffing it :D
Bacon came wrapped in muslin and covered in salt, as did Kippers.
Cheese was on ration as a staple, not a luxury food as now.

Growing up in the country, our diet included Rabbit, Hare, Horse Mushrooms, Pheasant, Pigeon and a good dose of D.D.T.. I remember the fields white with the stuff, and we used to play in them :eek::eek:

And you survived? *yes

And I bet you have fewer allergies and intolerances than recent generations.

Otto
15th December 2015, 04:38 PM
Both coal bricks and Ovoids were types of 'smokeless' fuel, and were by-products of town gas production.

Out here in the sticks we don't have mains gas so I still buy Ovoids for my stove. I don't know how they're produced these days but they chuck out a lot of heat and are reasonably smokeless. The coal man delivers every other Wednesday :)

When I was a kid in the Midlands my dad used to go down to the local gas works to buy sacks of coke for the boiler until he eventually got tired of it and we had a gas boiler put in. We had an egg man who came weekly and the Corona Man who delivered bottles of fizzy drinks.

I remember the first Chinese restaurant opening, and the local grocer going (gasp!) self-service!

Naughty Nigel
15th December 2015, 05:26 PM
I remember the first Chinese restaurant opening, and the local grocer going (gasp!) self-service!

I remember a Chinese restaurant opening in the west end of Woking, surrounded by stories of all sorts of wrong doing in the local paper.

Someone called the Public Health Inspector after one of the Chinese was seen carrying boxes of Kitekat into the restaurant. It was subsequently found they were using the stuff in one of their dishes (probably No 666). :eek:

Otto
15th December 2015, 05:55 PM
Could be worse, they might have been feeding cats with it ...

When I lived in Hemel Hempstead my favourite curry house was busted because of the number of rodents in the kitchen. They did the best jalfrezi in town :eek:. The local curry house here however has a food hygiene rating of 5 :).

Naughty Nigel
15th December 2015, 06:07 PM
Out here in the sticks we don't have mains gas so I still buy Ovoids for my stove. I don't know how they're produced these days but they chuck out a lot of heat and are reasonably smokeless.

I would imagine that Ovoids are a by-product of coke production, which is still required for steel making. They are like compressed coke dust.

Coke, creosote, ammonia, coal tar, nylon, benzene, toluene, xylene, barites and aspirin were at one time all by-products of coal gas (town gas) production. As far as I know coal gas is no longer produced anywhere in the world, but there are quite a few coke works.

The process is exactly the same except that the coal in coking works is cooked for a longer period, and hence contains much less flammable material when it leaves the ovens. Gas production was all about getting gas out as quickly as possible so the remaining coke had a much higher calorific value, and was useful as a 'smokeless fuel'.

OM USer
15th December 2015, 11:13 PM
You can't seem to buy proper creosote these days. Or turpentine.

DerekW
15th December 2015, 11:24 PM
A good patio cleaner is Armillatox a product of the coal industry - it also used to be sold as a pesticide before the EU said it had to be tested.

Wee man
16th December 2015, 12:30 AM
Canned Fray bentos steak and kidney pies anyone?

David M
16th December 2015, 03:01 AM
Canned Fray bentos steak and kidney pies anyone?

I remember those. Wasn't there a pudding in a different shaped can?

David M
16th December 2015, 03:12 AM
Returning your empty (glass) lemonade or tizer bottles for the refund.

Just about every recyclable container has a deposit on it in Saskatchewan, kids collect them up for extra pocket money. The only things with a deposit on them in Ontario are alcohol containers so a lot of recyclable material ends up in landfills.

RogerMac
16th December 2015, 03:45 AM
National Service?

Harold Gough
16th December 2015, 07:46 AM
Vegetables such as potatoes were in open-topped sacks in front of the counter at the corner shop. Penny ice lollies were made from lemonade powder by the shopkeeper, who also made ginger beer.

It was against the law for the shop to remain open after 6 pm. So, if we ran out of e.g. bread we would knock on their back door.

In those days, my father raised chickens and grew his own vegetables. Meat was served with Oxo gravy.

Cabbage was boiled until it went yellow and a treat was to drink the water it had been cooked in.

Sandwich fillings included salad cream or Daddies sauce.

We made home-made doughnuts, with the dough placed next to the open fire to rise.

On more than one occasion, home made (kit?) ice cream was left to freeze in snow outside out house. Ice cream from the shop was an individual block of vanilla between two wafers.

Bread and milk were delivered to the house by their respective horse and carts.

Harold

Kiwi Paul
16th December 2015, 08:05 AM
Spam, spam spam, spam?

and can I have Spam with spam please.

Harold Gough
16th December 2015, 08:22 AM
With reference to the ludicrous idea of buying bottled water, I don't recall other than full-cream milk.

Teabags were unknown.

Cheese was mostly Kraft Cheese Slices.

Harold

Rocknroll59
16th December 2015, 09:03 AM
Ah the fifties.....we think of them as happy days as things were so less complicated than today.....

I always walked to school my parents with 4 of us couldn't afford bus fares, and when we did it was a treat usually when it was raining cats and dogs !!:D. Would always walk home for lunch as well so walked on average 5>6 miles a day (sometimes ran all the way). Sometimes I would get threepence (remember those hexagonal coins) to buy what the cake shop would call 'stalies' (yesterdays cakes), and if you were early enough you could get the pick of the bunch, which for me was marshmallow covered in chocolate and sprinkled with coconut. Thing was I was never fat on it because of the exercise, walking and that's without football at breaktime (jumpers for goalposts).....and you try telling the kids today :p

Wee man
16th December 2015, 09:10 AM
Silver and gold top milk , never knew the difference.

Cremola foam , toothpaste in round tin's, DIY car repairs with parts available or broken parts fixed & telegrams

Olybirder
16th December 2015, 09:17 AM
Canned Fray bentos steak and kidney pies anyone?I was still buying those up to a couple of years ago. I have finally given up on them now though as it seems to be impossible to get the underside of the pastry cooked. Mary Berry wouldn't approve.

I bought a Fray Bentos steak and kidney pudding a few weeks ago and was shocked to discover that the 'can' is now plastic, it has a ring-pull lid and is cooked in the microwave for 90 seconds, rather than in boiling water for three quarters of an hour. It was an extremely pale imitation of my mother's delicious homemade steak pudding, with its suet crust, which was gently steamed on the stove for hours.

Ron

Naughty Nigel
16th December 2015, 11:52 AM
You can't seem to buy proper creosote these days. Or turpentine.

I'm afraid proper Creosote has too many nasties in it, including toxic heavy metals; which is why it was so good as a wood preservative. Likewise coal tar which was widely used in anticorrosive paints for ships bottoms and ballast tanks. (Epoxy tar and vinyl tar primers were some of the best water barriers known to man.)

One of the main nasties in Coal Tar and Creosote is Benzene, which has been recognised as a carcinogen for at least forty years, although it is still used to boost the octane rating of unleaded petrol.

(Pure Creosote, as used in some cough medicines is perfectly safe, but it is impractical to fraction it to medicinal standards on an industrial scale.)

Proper Turpentine is extracted from timber; hence its price and scarcity. White Spirit does almost as good a job (albeit with a shorter 'wet edge' time), and is readily available. The cheap stuff is fine for brush cleaning, but it is worth buying branded White Spirit for thinning. There is a difference.

Bikie John
16th December 2015, 12:04 PM
Thanks Nigel. This info is of no use to me (as far as I can tell), but it's always interesting to read other people's esoterica :)

John

byegad
16th December 2015, 02:02 PM
I remember those. Wasn't there a pudding in a different shaped can?

Yes, but weren't they identical in stodge?

Naughty Nigel
16th December 2015, 02:13 PM
Yes, but weren't they identical in stodge?

Yes. Walking anywhere after eating one, or even standing up was not recommended.

To make matters worse they were usually accompanied by greasy chips............ *susp

David M
16th December 2015, 10:26 PM
Yes. Walking anywhere after eating one, or even standing up was not recommended.

To make matters worse they were usually accompanied by greasy chips............ *susp

And mushy peas.

Crazy Dave
16th December 2015, 10:36 PM
Bread and milk were delivered to the house by their respective horse and carts.

Harold

We always knew when the milkman was walking up the front path of our prefab, his yodel was amazing

David

Imageryone
16th December 2015, 11:08 PM
Accumulator batteries for the radio delivered by a chap on a butchers bike :)

Crazy Dave
17th December 2015, 05:53 AM
Oh the nostalgia of it all. We lived on the route from Kings Cross Goods Yard to the abbatoir on Market Road. The cows were driven by men in brown coats who steered the cows with sticks with nails at the end. The cows must have sensed their fate because they were always breaking loose. Unimaginable today not far from Central London.

David

Mdb2
17th December 2015, 07:55 AM
There was no HEALTH and SAFETY them days. When I lived in the borough London SE1 we played on all the bomb sites and made camps with coverings of timber and Lino.
Then we would hurl stones and parts of the bricks at each other's camps to see who's camp gave in first.
We also regularly played on the barges on the river which were 3-4 deep tied together. They were full mostly of coal.
The borough fruit market was a treat and we would ask and scrounge bruised apples and fruit and I mean really bruised we would eat our way round the bruises biting into a bruise and spitting it out.
Toys were made go karts crossbows longbows scooters ball bearings which kept us occupied. We would be out best part of the day no worries about perverts.
Kind regards Mike

Naughty Nigel
17th December 2015, 09:00 AM
Accumulator batteries for the radio delivered by a chap on a butchers bike :)

'Wireless' please. :)

Barr1e
17th December 2015, 03:36 PM
Accumulator batteries for the radio delivered by a chap on a butchers bike :)

This Ivalek crystal radio from the fifties didn't need power, only a pair of headphones to listen to the medium wave. If you put the headphones in a medium size glass bowl it was possible to hear it playing.
http://fourthirds-user.com/galleries/data/500/Ivalek_crystal_radio_e-g.jpg (http://fourthirds-user.com/galleries/showphoto.php/photo/30158)
EM-1 OM-D + Olympus 12-40 lens - f5.6 - A.mode etc Radio measures L12.cm X H8.8cm X W6.5cm


Regards. Barrie

ps thanks for all the input and memories.

Otto
17th December 2015, 04:49 PM
Aha! The Ivalek :). We had one of those, possibly an earlier model as it had a second smaller knob to adjust the "cat's whisker". We could never get it to work so father took it to a radio shop where it was fitted with one of those new-fangled semiconductor diodes, after which it was fine :).

Naughty Nigel
17th December 2015, 05:24 PM
I remember the television repair man visiting our house quite regularly.

He drove a blue Morris Minor van and was always dressed in a white coat, (like a lab coat). He would bring a suitcase full of valves into the drawing room and would swap them until the set worked again. That was until the tube went, when he took it away for a week or so. Does anyone even replace television tubes nowadays?

Wee man
17th December 2015, 06:42 PM
Handier to replace the set! Back on topic ' sliders ' ?

Dewi9
17th December 2015, 07:39 PM
[QUOTE=Wee man;369807]Silver and gold top milk , never knew the difference.

When I was helping the milkman in the late 50's the gold top was from Jersey/Guernsey cows and the silver was from the rest. Something to do with fat content I believe.

David

Harold Gough
17th December 2015, 08:01 PM
IDoes anyone even replace television tubes nowadays?

They don't have them in LCD or Plasma ones.

Harold

Christoph
17th December 2015, 09:32 PM
Internaut, your mums mash came in a packet, FOR MASH GET SMASH.

Naughty Nigel
17th December 2015, 09:41 PM
Back onto the subject of food, I can still remember the smell of boiled cabbage when we processed into the school hall for morning assembly.

I don't know what the school cooks did with that cabbage, but I'm sure they boiled it to within an inch of its life for at least a week before we ate it.

Then there was the gravy. Every table had a gravy boat filled to the brim with beef gravy, which had evidently stood for some time, and had a layer of beef fat floating on it.

I had a strong dislike for school mashed potato, which really made me gag. Swede was little better. But of course we were not allowed to leave the dining hall until we had eaten everything on our plates.

Quite a few of us had notes from home asking that we be allowed to leave our mashed potato, so we hid anything else we didn't like under the mash! But looking on the bright side we never, ever had chips, or Turkey Twizzlers or any other hyper fatted junk food.

However, I did like rice pudding and Semolina; especially with rose hip syrup. I wasn't as keen on frogspawn (Tapioca), especially when it went thick and gooey.

Christoph
17th December 2015, 09:52 PM
Free school milk, always sour oh deep joy, hav'nt touched another drop since I graduated to long trousers.

Naughty Nigel
17th December 2015, 09:56 PM
When I was helping the milkman in the late 50's the gold top was from Jersey/Guernsey cows and the silver was from the rest. Something to do with fat content I believe.

David

Milk form Jersey cows was much creamier, and as you say had a higher fat content.

At home we had one bottle of gold top and three bottles of silver top every day. My mother used to like the cream from the top of the Jersey milk with her morning cup of tea. (Bork! :( )

People still believed that animal fat was good for them in those days.

We also had a small bottle of milk (1/3 pint) at school, whether we liked it or not! In the winter of 1963 the milk got so cold that it forced its way out of the bottles, and froze into a kind of mushroom shape.

I didn't mind cold milk, but I really didn't enjoy it when it had stood in front of a classroom radiator for several hours. :(

I don't think anyone had heard of skimmed or semi-skimmed milk, although some people with certain medical conditions used to buy goats milk from the milkman, which came in special bottles.

Nobody bought milk from shops or supermarkets, (I don't even know if they sold it), but if we had a surplus of milk at home my mother would either make a milk pudding or a fruit pie so she could make a big jug of custard.

Naughty Nigel
17th December 2015, 11:49 PM
As one who liked to 'push boundaries' at school I also remember the whooshing sound made by the Head Teacher's cane. ;)

David M
18th December 2015, 12:33 AM
Spam fritters for school lunch.

maccabeej
18th December 2015, 09:28 AM
I spent most of the fifties in Cyprus and Libya,so a lot of this means little to me. However the mention of Mary Berry prompts a thought a thought. She had polio as a child and the girl in the next bed was in an iron lung (for those too young google it). Any type of cancer was terminal and most people who had heart attacks died. Ah yes,the good old days😈. I'll shut up now and let everyone put their rose tinted specs back on (stylish NHS ones I guess).

maccabeej
18th December 2015, 09:30 AM
Sorry did I mention ice on the inside of the windows?

OM USer
18th December 2015, 10:16 AM
...I didn't mind cold milk, but I really didn't enjoy it when it had stood in front of a classroom radiator for several hours.
I much preferred ice cold milk to the lukewarm one from the radiator.

Everyone had school dinners; no such thing as a packed lunch. I was still having school dinners when I left at 18. No such thing as the school run either. It was walk to primary school and then public transport or bicycle when I moved on - whatever the weather!

mstphoto
18th December 2015, 10:29 AM
Reminds me of a mate of mine who was brought up on home made soup, mince and tatties and custard (not in the same dish ;) ) - a 3 course meal every day!!

One day we went into town and I felt a wee bit hungry so I bought a Macaroni Pie.
He'd never seen Macaroni Pies before and he asked me if there was mince in it :D
We still have a wee giggle about it today - 40 years later!!

Mike

Olybirder
18th December 2015, 10:31 AM
School dinners transformed my life. When I was young I was an extremely fussy eater and a real brat, throwing a tantrum if there was something which I didn't want to eat. When I moved on to grammar school I started having the dinners there and loved them. This must have been rather annoying for my mother who was an excellent cook! However, ever since then I will try almost any food and there is very little which I don't like. I still draw the line at tripe, though. :)

Ron

Otto
18th December 2015, 12:58 PM
Tripe and onions. Yum! *yes

Wee man
18th December 2015, 11:47 PM
Nnnnnnooooooooooooo!

Imageryone
19th December 2015, 07:56 AM
Is my memory playing tricks, or did there used to be " Steralized Milk " in a special bottle with crimped top?

Barkly
19th December 2015, 08:53 AM
My first year at school was in Hove (SSX) in 1951 and I couldn't believe what a great feed I got courtesy of the Government at lunch.

Came to Australia later that year and then hated the warm milk in little bottles left out in the sun we had at 'playtime'.

Had boring food all through the 1950s and most of the 1960s until we learnt what our beautiful European and Asian immigrants had brought to our country. Love it.

Just about to have a great curry.

Back shortly.

ian p
19th December 2015, 09:28 AM
Back then, spyware meant a big coat and hat worn by Kim Philby.
It certainly does, Peter.

And back then DSLR was just an anagram for Democrats, Socialists, Luddites & Republicans, wasn't it :confused:

I'm leaving! *chr
And the only person doing HDR was Nicolas Parsons. Hesitation, Deviation and Repetition.

When curry finally arrived, mum bought Vesta curry in a pack. And made it exactly as shown on the front. Rice all around the edge with the curry in the middle. My father complained of the smell in the house and wouldn't eat "wog food". A shocking term he still occasionally uses, much to our shame.

The reel to reel tape player had a level meter in a valve with phosphorescent display. We were told it was called the "magic eye" .

Otto
19th December 2015, 10:23 AM
I remember Vesta curries - and they're still available but either my memory is playing tricks or they're not as good as they used to be. Our radiogram had a "magic eye" tuning indicator.

Sterilised milk was indeed available, it came in a bottle with a crown cap (like a beer bottle) and tasted disgusting. I suppose it was an early version of UHT milk - which is equally disgusting!

Naughty Nigel
19th December 2015, 06:44 PM
I remember Vesta curries - and they're still available but either my memory is playing tricks or they're not as good as they used to be. Our radiogram had a "magic eye" tuning indicator.

Sterilised milk was indeed available, it came in a bottle with a crown cap (like a beer bottle) and tasted disgusting. I suppose it was an early version of UHT milk - which is equally disgusting!

Ahh yes. 'Magic eye' tuning indicators. They were fascinating things, and worked well as level controls as there was no inertia, and no moving parts. I have a couple in my bits box somewhere.

Sterilised milk was indeed a forerunner of today's UHT milk. I cannot remember now whether it tasted disgusting or just didn't taste of anything at all. Sterilised milk only ever came in the skimmed variety which was tasteless and disgusting anyway, and like school cabbage was boiled to within an inch of its life. I would rather have my tea or coffee black, thank you. :(

(Mods: Please can we have a ''sick' emoticon? )

The UHT process has improved massively over the years, and I believe the milk is now only heated for a very short time.

Naughty Nigel
19th December 2015, 06:51 PM
Sorry did I mention ice on the inside of the windows?

Oh yes. :)

And the only central heating was the Aga in the kitchen - long before they became must-have fashion accessories for the nouveau riche living in their home counties barn conversions with his 'n hers Range Rovers parked outside. :(

I used to like sitting on ours if it wasn't too hot, but my mother always warned me they I would get piles! :D

ian p
19th December 2015, 06:52 PM
Tough times. If your Range Rover had to be parked outside.

Naughty Nigel
19th December 2015, 07:10 PM
Tough times. If your Range Rover had to be parked outside.

I think you are missing the point Ian.

If the Range Rovers weren't parked outside nobody would see them, and there would be no point in spraying aerosol mud around the wheel arches. :(

We live not far from a tasteless yuppie / nouveau riche development of large, gated properties which is popular with footballers, property developers and suchlike. Most of the properties have at least a double garage, but they only ever house the au pair's Fiat 500 and perhaps their offspring's Mini Cooper. The Porsches, 7-Series BMW's and S Class Mercs are parked out on the sweeping driveways to be admired by the neighbours. :rolleyes:

ian p
19th December 2015, 07:12 PM
I think you are missing the point Ian.

If the Range Rovers weren't parked outside nobody would see them, and there would be no point in spraying aerosol mud around the wheel arches. :(

We live not far from a tasteless yuppie / nouveau riche development of large, gated properties which is popular with footballers, property developers and suchlike. Most of the properties have at least a double garage, but they only ever house the au pair's Fiat 500 and perhaps their offspring's Mini Cooper. The Porsches, 7-Series BMW's and S Class Mercs are parked out on the sweeping driveways to be admired by the neighbours. :rolleyes:
Ah I see. I'm a bit naive you see. But I live in BMW country. And the offspring get top of the range++ BMW, Porsche and Mercedes. And think they are special.

Naughty Nigel
19th December 2015, 08:23 PM
Ah I see. I'm a bit naive you see.

And I am cynical. *yes

But I live in BMW country. And the offspring get top of the range++ BMW, Porsche and Mercedes. And think they are special.

And no doubt an iPhone or three? :(

I always thought that was just a British phenomena, but clearly am wrong.

I have nothing against BMW, Porsche, Mercedes et al, who make some fine cars, but where is the originality? These people just seem follow the herd as everyone else.

ian p
19th December 2015, 09:01 PM
And I am cynical. *yes
And no doubt an iPhone or three? :(

No. The iPhone is a UK, US thing. Not here in mainland Europe.
But there is no shortage of shallow jerks and snobs. Munich is famous for it.

Crazy Dave
19th December 2015, 10:02 PM
Mrs Dale
Festival of Britain
The Eagle
Elvis, Tommy Steele, Lonnie Donegan
Stanley Matthews, Tom Finney, Dennis Compton
Standing in the rain on Coronation Day on Picadilly
Bob-a-Job
Twist at 5 3/4d per loaf
Christmas Club at the off-licence
Frido Footballs
The Cubs
Tide & Omo posters
Trams, Trolley Buses, Clippiez
A cat named 'Little Mo', catsmeat lady, 'ol rag and lumber'
Club Row animal market
Cinder football pitches
Chilblains

And not necessarily in that order.

David

Wee man
20th December 2015, 09:11 AM
Luncheon meat in little jars.

Imageryone
20th December 2015, 10:22 AM
Here is a new slant :)

Scarred Knees !!!

DerekW
20th December 2015, 10:56 AM
and Shippams Fish Paste and other meat packed in small narrow jars. Still made in Chichester although the factory and offices have now been converted into apartments.

ringneck
20th December 2015, 01:08 PM
School dinners and Milk....best invention EVER..loved all of them....no one ever sent mashed potato (or anything else) back for pigswill as all the leftovers headed down the table to ME...he he......I could have stayed there all afternoon eating the puddings..........BTW...the Cabbage was one of the best bits...still is.
What a day....
get up...breakfast..
off to school for a couple of hours...free Milk.
another couple of hours...FREE food..
two more hours...run home for tea..
out to play in fields etc for couple of hours...
Supper...bed.

Sardine and Tomato paste sarnies good as well

50's and 60's....iced up windows for about 3 months as only heat was the one coal fire in back room...heated water as well.

Stera milk was put in Tea and "camp" type coffee and other milk for cereals/ puddings and drinking.

Crazy Dave
20th December 2015, 02:52 PM
Roy Rogers & Hopalong
Journey into Space
Dick Barton - Special Agent
Scout Camp pulling a Trek Cart - predated furniture van
Burl Ives - The Runaway Train'
Passing of George VI
Star, News and Standerrred
First Ball point
News Chronicle, Sketch
Quids, Ten bob notes, Nickers & Florins
Short trousers til 15
Dandy, Beano
Brylcream
Teddy Boys, Brothel Creepers
'for those in peril from the Sea' - Fridays
Air Pistols
Cap Guns
Doctors and Nurses
Swimming Certificates Width and Length
Bill Haley

Definitely not in that order


David

Harold Gough
20th December 2015, 03:32 PM
Saturday morning pictures (kids' cinema club).

Radio Luxembourg (after sunset).

Harold

David M
20th December 2015, 03:38 PM
and Shippams Fish Paste and other meat packed in small narrow jars. Still made in Chichester although the factory and offices have now been converted into apartments.

I remember those although I'd never have remembered the brand.

Wasn't there a brand of margarine called Stork?

DerekW
20th December 2015, 03:45 PM
Still is
https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=stork+margarine&rlz=1C5CHFA_enGB516GB518&espv=2&biw=1524&bih=1234&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjZnOOO4-rJAhXBXhQKHaZZC8oQsAQIRA&dpr=1

and also where to use it when not being used to lubricated rusty gate hinges.

http://www.bakewithstork.com/

Harold Gough
20th December 2015, 04:30 PM
"Muffin the Mule"

Harold

Crazy Dave
20th December 2015, 08:48 PM
Saturday morning pictures (kids' cinema club).

Radio Luxembourg (after sunset).

Harold

Harold Batchelor Keynsham, Bristol.

That's K-E-Y-N-S-H-A-M, Bristol

(Football Pools for those too young)

David

Naughty Nigel
20th December 2015, 09:07 PM
Radiograms and television sets that took several minutes to warm up before you could watch or listen to them.

I was given a Mamod steam engine when I was about seven or eight, which ran on methylated spirit. Even at that age I could buy a bottle meths from the local chemist if I explained it was for my steam engine.

It ran well until my big brother thought we could save time by only part filling the boiler with cold water, instead of boiling a kettle first. I don't think he put enough water in though as the solder joint on the boiler melted, and one of the end plates blew off with enough force to send it about 50' down the garden. :eek:

And then there were Meccano sets. :)

Cap Guns

Ahh yes, I remember those too. The caps would probably be classed as explosives today, and would be far too dangerous for a six-year old to play with, not to mention to damage that might be caused to young minds. :(

No wonder we all grew up as disturbed adults. :rolleyes:

Wee man
20th December 2015, 09:27 PM
Beef dripping sold in greaseproof paper tubs for use in fry ups!

Olybirder
21st December 2015, 12:09 AM
We seem to have drifted away slightly from the original subject of eating in the fifties but on the topic of cap guns I remember the little bombs which were on sale. They were small solid metal eggs with a detachable top half. A gun cap was placed between the two halves and they were held together with an elastic band. The whole device was thrown up into the air and would explode with a bang as it hit the ground.

There were also some lethal fireworks on sale those days. Jumping jacks were lit on the ground and would go shooting off in unpredictable directions with a series of explosions but worst of all were aeroplanes. They were basically a rocket without a stick but sporting cardboard wing stapled across. We would place them on the bird table(!), light them and they would suddenly fly off horizontally at huge velocity and at head height. I wonder why they don't sell them now? ;)

Ron

Otto
21st December 2015, 10:55 AM
I remember those aeroplane fireworks now you mention it. The H&S police would have a fit nowadays! It was Horace Batchelor on Radio Luxembourg; he used to advertise his "infra-draw method" for winning on the football pools. I used to wonder why, if it was so successful, he needed to sell it to everyone else!

I still fry my chips in beef dripping, as does the local chippie. It's the only way :).

Harold Gough
21st December 2015, 11:51 AM
Canned Fray bentos steak and kidney pies anyone?

Various varieties are now on the shelves of Tesco.

Harold

Graham_of_Rainham
21st December 2015, 01:50 PM
A 1d chew, could last you the whole day. Bluebird & Palm Toffee (Banana & Liquorice where my favorite)

Liquorice root / wood

2oz of sweets was a real treat and anyone asking for a quarter of something was showing off or it was their birthday.

1d Bag of "cracklings" from the Chippie...

2d for a bag of "broken biscuits" and 1d for a bag of biscuit crumbs.

Frozen Jubbly (but not until the late 50s)

Parma Violets & Imps made me feel sick and I didn't like Dib Dabs either.

Barley Sugar was the sweetest thing I remember & Pear Drops made the roof of my mouth itch.

The "School Run" meant you were late...

LSD was Pounds Shillings & Pence

Finding money in the street was a huge event. Anything less than 6d you got to keep, up to 2/6d had to be shared. We once found a wallet with notes in, took it to the Police Station. A man came to our house and gave us a 10s note as a reward.

I've managed to block all memories of school dinners... *crap

Wee man
21st December 2015, 02:58 PM
Keeping to the eating theme

Lucky bags? early version of Kinder surprise paper bag sweets and toy inside.
McGowans toffee bars.
Fruit salad chews.
Coke in real glass bottles with crown cap lid.

6d ( 2 .5 pence) Mars bars which my memory tells me were almost the size of the modern king size? And the disappointed children when the price went to 7d.

Licorice straws.

Areo chocolate bars, really good marketing ploy same size bars as other chocolate bars but due to the air bubbles not so much content!

Free meaty bones for your dog? Faded out or a charge appeared.

David M
21st December 2015, 03:22 PM
Still is
https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=stork+margarine&rlz=1C5CHFA_enGB516GB518&espv=2&biw=1524&bih=1234&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjZnOOO4-rJAhXBXhQKHaZZC8oQsAQIRA&dpr=1

and also where to use it when not being used to lubricated rusty gate hinges.

http://www.bakewithstork.com/

Thanks Derek, I assumed it was one.of those brands that disappeared or was renamed years ago.

Olybirder
21st December 2015, 04:51 PM
Wagon Wheels which were about the same diameter as a CD, rather than the minidisc size versions we get now.
Fry's Five Boys Chocolate.
Old English Spangles.

Ron

Otto
21st December 2015, 05:10 PM
Mars bars were 4d when I first ate one, and Milky Ways were 3d. A price hike to 6d for the Mars was a bit much! They were huge back then - or perhaps my mouth was smaller :).

David M
21st December 2015, 05:20 PM
Wasn't there a chocolate bar called Bar Six?

maccabeej
21st December 2015, 06:22 PM
On margarine Echo and Blue Band (I think these were the brands), were produced on the same line. Echo wrapped in paper was the budget band and Blue Band in foil the luxury choice. I'd still rather have butter!

Wee man
21st December 2015, 09:11 PM
David M I think you are right it had a smiling little boy on the wrapper?

Oly, strange I think the same about Wagon Wheels they are more like run flat spares now.

Otto earlier than me reaching financial independence, that was some increase, but agree on size.

OM USer
21st December 2015, 09:24 PM
OMO washing powder.

Eagle comic.

Outside lavatories.

Smoked cod (rather than the dyed cod you get now days).

Blackberries picked from the brambles in the park.

Naughty Nigel
21st December 2015, 09:39 PM
Kippers for tea on Saturday, followed by buttered bread smothered with black treacle. :D

I still enjoy it from time to time.

As somebody else said, chicken was only eaten on special occasions such as Christmas and Easter. We seemed to live on a diet of fatty beef and fatty lamb, except on Fridays when we always had fish.

Is it any wonder that the nation's cardiac health was so bad in those days?

I also remember my mother force feeding me with a large spoonful of Cod Liver Oil every morning, on the promise that it was 'good for me'. I suppose I should be grateful but it tasted horrible.

Otto
22nd December 2015, 09:39 AM
Actually, animal fat isn't bad for you any more (http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/features/the-science-of-saturated-fat-a-big-fat-surprise-about-nutrition-9692121.html) :).

Just don't put sugar on it :D.

Zuiko
22nd December 2015, 10:12 AM
When my Mum was a child, beef dripping on toast was a regular treat; she's 88 now.

DerekW
22nd December 2015, 10:18 AM
"OMO washing powder."

Legend has it that a packet of OMO placed in the front facing kitchen window was an invitation for socialising - "Old Man Out"

Zuiko
22nd December 2015, 10:30 AM
"OMO washing powder."

Legend has it that a packet of OMO placed in the front facing kitchen window was an invitation for socialising - "Old Man Out"

What, so the girls could all get together for coffee? :)

ian p
22nd December 2015, 02:29 PM
I think my mum used to be a Muslim. In all the pictures taken of her from that time, she always wore a head scarf.

Naughty Nigel
22nd December 2015, 02:41 PM
I think my mum used to be a Muslim back then. In all the pictures of her taken back then she was wearing a head scarf.

Head scarves seemed to be very popular attire for ladies back then, possibly to hide the curlers underneath! :D

David M
22nd December 2015, 02:46 PM
Head scarves seemed to be very popular attire for ladies back then, possibly to hide the curlers underneath! :D

Just what I was thinking.

Crazy Dave
22nd December 2015, 02:53 PM
Policemen on Rayleigh bikes
Kids hanging outside pubs
Hopscotch on the pavement
Coal Dust
Travelling Knife sharpeners
Gobstoppers
Making fire lighters from diagonally folded newspapers
Tin Can Tommy
The Wizard - Roy of the Rovers
Wringers
Penny for the Guy (Sisters made good guys with a touch of shoe polish.
Paraffin heaters
Chanting times tables
Birds & Bees from biology teacher
Many, many family sayings. 'Mum, that Cyril Washbrook's famous and a really good cricketer'. 'Yes, his mum used to do my mum's washing'.
How many beans make five?
'You know what thought did........?

David

ian p
22nd December 2015, 02:57 PM
Harry Truman, Doris Day, Red China, Johnnie Ray
South Pacific, Walter Winchell, Joe DiMaggio
Joe McCarthy, Richard Nixon, Studebaker, Television
North Korea, South Korea, Marilyn Monroe

Rosenbergs, H-Bomb, Sugar Ray, Panmunjom
Brando, The King And I, and The Catcher In The Rye
Eisenhower, Vaccine, England's got a new queen
Marciano, Liberace, Santayana goodbye

We didn't start the fire
It was always burning
Since the world's been turning
We didn't start the fire
No we didn't light it
But we tried to fight it


Thank you Billy frickin' Joel!

Crazy Dave
22nd December 2015, 04:16 PM
Educating Archie - The Glums
Ray's a Laugh -
Black & White Minstrels
Neddie Seagoon
Jollop
Billy Cotton - Sunday Lunchtime
Hey round the Corner, behind the bush..........
Billy Fury
Alma Cogan (yuck)
Camp Coffee
No phone
Gas anaesthetic at the dentist
Paper Rounds
'Take the first one you come to on the plate'.
Cissies
Bomb sites and flying bricks
Captain Marvel
Bernard Braden and his Family
Arthur Askey
Condensed Milk

David

Naughty Nigel
22nd December 2015, 04:22 PM
Billy Cotton - Sunday Lunchtime

..... Followed by World Wide Family Favourites, with requests for people in far flung parts of the jolly old British Empire. :)

Oh, and Dick Barton, Special Agent.

Dixon of Dock Green.

Z-Cars.

Crossroads. :(

Crazy Dave
22nd December 2015, 05:23 PM
How much is that Doggie in the Window?
Mambo Italiano
Donald Peers
The Shadows
Rock Island Line
Tea Chest, broom stick and string
Woggles
Broken Biscuits
Cockles and mussels
Chivers Jelly
First Banana
Blancmange
"Mr Coleman got rich from the mustard people left on their plates" - Old English Proverb
Truncated names Vi - Flo - Gert- Bert
Mrs Henn - got no food, my Arry's going to 'ave air pie and windy pudding.
Dropped handlebar envy
Derailleur gears, yes - Sturmey Archer, no

This thread is driving me crazy!

David

Otto
22nd December 2015, 05:41 PM
I miss blancmange. Can you still buy it anywhere? Used to come as a powder in cardboard packets I think. We used to have it for pud after Sunday lunch :).

Naughty Nigel
22nd December 2015, 06:16 PM
Watching steam trains at our local railway station and collecting their engine numbers. :D

Going off to school on trains hauled by a steam locos. :D :D :D

Crazy Dave
22nd December 2015, 09:53 PM
Apologies if this has been already mentioned.

FOG

Bonfires in the street to provide light, men guiding buses through the streets. I remember being unable to see the pavement from the middle of the road. Lost on the street where I lived.

David

David M
22nd December 2015, 10:04 PM
David M I think you are right it had a smiling little boy on the wrapper?

I seem to remember an orange wrapper but not much more. Didn't the Ovaltine tin have a smiling kid on it?

Crazy Dave
22nd December 2015, 10:21 PM
Last one today:

In Town Tonight with Brian Johnson - aka Johnners

David

Naughty Nigel
23rd December 2015, 01:46 PM
Last one today:

In Town Tonight with Brian Johnson - aka Johnners

David

I recall one of Johnner's favourite phrases was "the man is a cad and a bounder, and was probably a day boy." :D

Crazy Dave
23rd December 2015, 02:59 PM
I recall one of Johnner's favourite phrases was "the man is a cad and a bounder, and was probably a day boy." :D

I think that his "The bowler's Holding, the batsman's Willey" is one of the best remembered although there's some debate as to whether he actually said it.

David

Wee man
23rd December 2015, 05:48 PM
David I still remember a chocolate bar with a smiling boy. Ovaltine had a couple the Ovaltinies?

Otto
23rd December 2015, 06:02 PM
I used to love the interplay between Johnners and Fred Trueman on Test Match Special, whilst this was later than the 1950s it was often about eating - eating the cakes sent in by listeners :).

Bikie John
23rd December 2015, 07:42 PM
On the mystery chocolate theme - I have very vague memories of a bar called "Five Boys", I wonder if that is the one you are thinking of. Must google it when I get a few minutes.......

John

Bikie John
23rd December 2015, 07:49 PM
A bit about Five Boys here on Wiki:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fry%27s_Chocolate_Cream

The one I remember must have been the Cadbury one, about which it says "Cadbury's also produced a solid milk chocolate bar called Five Boys using the Fry's trademark from 1902 until 1976."

John (who now has the munchies and is off to slake them....)

David M
23rd December 2015, 09:04 PM
David I still remember a chocolate bar with a smiling boy. Ovaltine had a couple the Ovaltinies?

I googled Bar Six, most of the images of wrappers were orange but non had an image of a kid on them. I don't remember a chocolate bar with the image of a child on it.

Barr1e
23rd December 2015, 09:13 PM
David I still remember a chocolate bar with a smiling boy. Ovaltine had a couple the Ovaltinies?

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=we+are+the+ovaltineys+song&view=detail&mid=9295D5EFB72A248673949295D5EFB72A24867394&FORM=VIRE2

Regards. Barr1e

Wee man
23rd December 2015, 10:21 PM
David not sure if this is it

Well done that man (Bikie John) yes that was the Bar I was thinking of it was one boy but five expressions

Fry’s Five Boys




http://pocketbookuk.files.wordpress.com/2013/11/frysfiveboyschocwrapper1.jpg?w=160&h=197 (http://pocketbookuk.files.wordpress.com/2013/11/frysfiveboyschocwrapper1.jpg)A Fry’s Five Boys chocolate wrapper. The bars were marked off into five segments, each with one of the faces stamped into the chocolate. The bars originally cost 1d when launched in 1902, that’s just under half of 1p in today’s money.

Fry’s Five Boys was a solid milk chocolate bar that was once the most recognised chocolate bar in the world. It was still being sold until its withdrawal in 1976. But who remembers it now?
It was first sold by J S Fry & Sons of Bristol in 1902 with a wrapper showing not five boys, but the face of one boy, in a sailor suit, with five different expressions representing his anticipation and experience of eating the chocolate bar. Beneath each face was a caption:
Desperation, Pacification, Expectation, Acclamation, Realization [with a ‘z’]
The five pictures were photographs taken in 1885 and were used by J S Fry & Sons in its advertising; appearing on enamelled metal signs displayed outside confectioners, on posters and in newspapers. The boy was Lindsay Poulton, aged five, and his father and grandfather took the photographs for which Fry’s paid £200, a very large sum at the time, to have exclusive use of them.



* my bold

David M
23rd December 2015, 10:33 PM
I don't remember Five Boys, the only Fry's products I remember are the Turkish Delight and Chocolate Cream bars.

Otto
23rd December 2015, 11:11 PM
I do vaguely recall Five Boys. There was also the Milky Bar Kid whose bespectacled face did appear on the wrapper of Milky Bars (white chocolate). You can still get Milky Bars, now made by Nestlé but were they originally Fry's?

Olybirder
24th December 2015, 12:06 AM
I remember Fry's Five Boys chocolate bar and even made a reference to it in post number 102. :) I also used to like Fry's Five Centres with a different flavoured cream in each section. I enjoy a bit of choice and always liked those little variety packs of cereal. For some reason the miniature individual boxes always tasted better than the full-size versions.

Ron

Crazy Dave
24th December 2015, 09:22 AM
My final throw on this one - maybe!

Christmas Puddings with silver sixpences.

Happy Christmas

David

Bikie John
24th December 2015, 09:48 AM
I remember Fry's Five Boys chocolate bar and even made a reference to it in post number 102. :) I also used to like Fry's Five Centres with a different flavoured cream in each section. I enjoy a bit of choice and always liked those little variety packs of cereal. For some reason the miniature individual boxes always tasted better than the full-size versions.

Ron

Sorry Ron, I didn't intend to hijack your post. Perhaps it was yours that set the subliminal bells ringing.

John

Olybirder
24th December 2015, 10:10 AM
No need to apologise John. I'm sorry if I sounded stroppy. I didn't mean to. I blame it on too much chocolate in my youth. :)

We used to have the Mackintosh's chocolate and toffee factory in Norwich which produced Quality Street and Rolos. When the wind was in the right direction the smell was amazing. My uncle worked there and used to give us brown paper bags full of chocolate mis-shapes. They had some of the chocolate badly applied or were bizarre shapes but they tasted great. One of the brands, Caleys, has been revived in recent years.

Ron

Bikie John
24th December 2015, 11:59 AM
:)

Norwich sounds rather like York, where I mis-spent three years studenting courtesy of the public exchequer. Depending on wind direction, we would get the scent of Rowntrees (who I think were making Rolos there by then) or Terry's (of Chocolate Orange fame).

Were both cities Quaker strongholds? York was, and I think there was quite a strong Quaker influence in the chocolate industry - Cadbury's were as well as Rowntrees.

John

Naughty Nigel
24th December 2015, 06:26 PM
http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/Norwich_Bob_s_Your_Uncle.jpg (http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/87889)

OM USer
24th December 2015, 09:01 PM
The onion man on his bicyle pedalling his wares (just had to throw that pun in).

Wee man
24th December 2015, 10:25 PM
Refreshers. : a chew with fizz in the centre

Walti
25th December 2015, 09:07 AM
I do vaguely recall Five Boys. There was also the Milky Bar Kid whose bespectacled face did appear on the wrapper of Milky Bars (white chocolate). You can still get Milky Bars, now made by Nestlé but were they originally Fry's?

I seem to remember nest ells Milky Bar even as a child, none of this ness lay malarkey!

Imageryone
25th December 2015, 02:39 PM
May be alone in this one :-

Dumplings as a sweet, boiled and served with Golden Syrup, yum!