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Mdb2
5th December 2015, 09:20 AM
A short while ago I visited the national history museum to see for myself the best of the best. This is only my observations and not critisms. I could not find any Olympus exhibits and there were plenty of exhibits. It seemed all were by canon and Nikon users. I believe if memory serves me well there was one Fuji image. The images were very well presented and the charge of 6 was fair.
Any comments as to why none were from Olympus and the m4/3 contingent?
Kind regards mike

benvendetta
5th December 2015, 10:07 AM
It's not that m43rds kit is incapable. It is just that most serious wildlife photographers use Nikon and Canon.

Imageryone
5th December 2015, 11:29 AM
It is a lot to do with the Sponsors, which MIGHT involve those two ??

David M
5th December 2015, 01:10 PM
Maybe because some Olympus users regard the competition as a joke and don't even bother checking out the winning shots these days. When some of the winning entries were taken at game farms or were set up the competition lost all credibility for me.

Wally
5th December 2015, 01:31 PM
Have seen plenty of adverts on TV etc., for the dark side and Olympus being conspicuous by their absence. Same experience raises its ugly head when trying to get hands on experience before buying.

The quality is there, but access to the goods is not.

Imageryone
5th December 2015, 01:44 PM
Have seen plenty of adverts on TV etc., for the dark side and Olympus being conspicuous by their absence. Same experience raises its ugly head when trying to get hands on experience before buying.

The quality is there, but access to the goods is not.

Same in a lot of magazines etc .

Mdb2
5th December 2015, 04:56 PM
Thanks for your comments,surely there must be macro and close up photographers that entered this competition.There were lots of commended and youth entries I wonder if the images on show were to a certain standard of
Resolution?
Kind regards Mike.

timboo
5th December 2015, 09:11 PM
In light of the post so far do some of these competitions have minimum requirments kit wise?

Mdb2
6th December 2015, 08:48 AM
Have seen plenty of adverts on TV etc., for the dark side and Olympus being conspicuous by their absence. Same experience raises its ugly head when trying to get hands on experience before buying.

The quality is there, but access to the goods is not.

Hi Wally, I must admit I have noticed the same especially the latter part part of your input, I have jessops in my local town centre and in Reading Berks ( new store) quite alright if you want a new camera and maybe a lens but useless for accessories I've given up and try to get to Londons west end, combining it with a trip with the wife when she has booked a show with her sisters.
Kind regards mike

drmarkf
6th December 2015, 09:46 AM
Most wildlife photographers feel they want the kit that enables them to have the best chance of shooting birds in flight, plus it's only in the past year or two that many pros of any type have been going mirrorless. It's also only since production of the 40-150/1.4 combination that Oly have had a long lens that's good enough for a lot of wildlife.

Pros also want to stick with kit that has already proved reliable in their own hands and that they know: it's perfectly understandable that there is only slow change. Failure means you don't get paid. There have to be proven benefits before they'll take the risk.

If OMD CAF performance can genuinely be improved with next year's releases, and the 300 and 100-400 appear and are good, then a higher proportion will switch. Remember that Fuji are also now producing longer lenses and a t/c, and that some Sony bodies already have reasonable CAF with tracking (although not yet good long glass) so they may not choose Oly (although here Panasonic's video supremacy probably works in favour of m4/3 for people who shoot stills and video since you can have one of each body and maximise advantages while also having backup).

I've also recently been to the Landscape Photographer OTY show at Waterloo station: all were CaNikon bar (as I recall) one Sony, one Fuji, one ?Ricoh and one 10x8 plate camera with a Fujinon lens! Not surprising for landscape, perhaps.

Finally, earlier in the year I went to the Travel POTY at the Royal Geographical Soc. Penetration of mirrorless here was higher but still minimal - I forget the exact numbers, but it was something like 90% Canikon, 5% Sony, 3% Fuji and 2% bar (including only one Olympus E-M1).

I spoke to one of the judges at the TPOTY, himself a long-term Fuji mirrorless user, and he said a matching 90% of the submissions to the comp were still on DSLRs.

I don't accept that all these competitions can be influenced by the DSLR manufacturers sponsorship of the events: it's down to the pros and serious amateurs being understandably slow to switch. It will come, probably first in the TPOTY.

OM USer
6th December 2015, 06:10 PM
Have seen plenty of adverts on TV etc., for the dark side and Olympus being conspicuous by their absence....

"Android Magazine" seems to alternate in each issue between a full page ad just inside the cover for Olympus OMD and one for Sony NEX. Just to prove the point though the last issue had one for some TV thing.

timboo
9th December 2015, 07:19 PM
When you go to a football match most journalists have cameras on a tripod etc with the biggest lens known to man. Size doesnt matter neither does the bank balance to these people. so why would they go for M4/3 at present. Its not going to happen.
I suppose wildlife may fall into this catagory for twitchers. Just think its one explanation re the title of this thread and the lack of m4/3 entrants.

Ian
10th December 2015, 09:03 AM
With the fast improving selection of telephoto lenses appearing for Micro Four Thirds and the evidence that photographers we, here, are aware of being able to produce great wildlife images, it surely must only be a matter of time before photographers using Olympus and Panasonic Micro Four Thirds kit start to feature in this category.

Ian

drmarkf
10th December 2015, 09:37 AM
I agree, Ian.

At my camera club a reasonable number of good photographers have used Fuji crop-sensor mirrorless kit for some years, often combined with a DSLR setup for landscape or sports/wildlife, but overwhelmingly DSLRs have ruled.

In the last 12-18 months however there has been a massive change, with now most of the club committee plus several of the 'top' club members buying Olympus OMD kit. By 'top' I mean as measured by how often they place in club competitions.

Again these are being bought as supplements to existing Canikon gear, but several people have now sold their old kit.

Hardly a meeting goes by without someone coming up to me and asking about Olympus equipment, and I've lent several people various bits and pieces to try. I'm going to be asking Olympus for 10% on all consequent sales!

Of course this is a big club (nearly 200 members) and there are a lot of superb wildlife, sports and 'big' landscape photographers who perfectly reasonably are sticking with their big gear for now, but it will come.

Melaka
10th December 2015, 06:43 PM
Is part of the problem that we Oly owners don't bother to participate in these competitions? There are some stunning photos on this site, many of which are more than good enough to win. I get a trickle of photos published every year but the magazines never say they're taken with an Oly. Maybe we're guilty of hiding our lights under a bushel.

Mdb2
13th December 2015, 10:02 AM
Is part of the problem that we Oly owners don't bother to participate in these competitions? There are some stunning photos on this site, many of which are more than good enough to win. I get a trickle of photos published every year but the magazines never say they're taken with an Oly. Maybe we're guilty of hiding our lights under a bushel.

Hi Melaka, I think you are nearer the truth of the matter than we all realise, I believe we all should try harder to get into publishing our images and at local camera clubs.
Mike

Melaka
13th December 2015, 04:20 PM
Regrettably I'm as guilty as the rest!

Graham_of_Rainham
13th December 2015, 04:39 PM
I was fortunate to have spent the day with the world renowned wildlife photographer, Paul Hobson ( http://www.paulhobson.co.uk/ ) Who works with Canon kit.
He told me Nikon sent him a full set of kit to try and tempt him to use there cameras.

At the time I was using an E-500 with a 50-200 SWD and during the day he showed quite an interest in it.

When I submitted my pictures to Amateur Photographer, they used six of my pictures in a five page article from their "Masterclass" series. I was very pleased that they used my image of a fox as the headline picture for the article.

David M
13th December 2015, 04:52 PM
Funny you should say that Graham, in the 90's when my nature work was being published regularly Leica offered me a R kit. I declined, preferring to stick with my OM kit.

mstphoto
13th December 2015, 05:12 PM
IMHO, coming from Canon, the lack of good quality long Olympus lenses could be a factor.
I would imagine that most wildlife shots would be taken with a lens of at least 400mm, with the 500 f4 being the most popular for this type of photography.
Perhaps this will all change when the 300 f4 comes on the market ;)

Mike

IanB
13th December 2015, 09:44 PM
Perhaps this will all change when the 300 f4 comes on the market ;)
Mike

that has nailed it *yes

Mdb2
13th December 2015, 11:00 PM
IMHO, coming from Canon, the lack of good quality long Olympus lenses could be a factor.
I would imagine that most wildlife shots would be taken with a lens of at least 400mm, with the 500 f4 being the most popular for this type of photography.
Perhaps this will all change when the 300 f4 comes on the market ;)

Mike

Mike, I think you are partly right we will have to see how good the EM mk2 is as well as the 300 f4 for a chance at wildlife action shots especially.
Kind regards Mike.

katran
19th December 2015, 10:09 AM
I think this is the right place to post this.

GH4, GX8 and E-M5 II are in the top 10 cameras for travelers from NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC:


http://www.43rumors.com/the-gh4-gx8-e-m5ii-are-among-the-top-10-compact-cameras-for-travelers-from-national-geographic



IMHO, coming from Canon, the lack of good quality long Olympus lenses could be a factor.
I would imagine that most wildlife shots would be taken with a lens of at least 400mm, with the 500 f4 being the most popular for this type of photography.
Perhaps this will all change when the 300 f4 comes on the market ;)
Mike

Using minimum 500mm, it is true for cameras with larger sensors than Olympus (with shorter equivalent focal lenses).
Using 500mm on fullframe camera is one thing, using 500mm on a 2x crop factor camera is a complete different thing.
For Olympus, 300mm is a very nice focal length to start.
If you want longer lenses, buy professional lenses like Zuiko 300mm F/2.8 and 90-250mm F/2.8 and put teleconvertors on it. Both works very fine even with EC-20 (2X) and the quality of the photos is still very nice at 100%, usable for professional use. In this case you will have 500-600mm F/5.6 (1000-1200mm equivalent) which is a bit too much in my opinion. I would use maximum 500mm.

I do wildlife with Olympus.
Imagine how hard is to stabilize an 1200mm lens equivalent on Olympus, and is not only this. If the lens is fixed size, you have problems even to find the subject in the frame.

I tried an 800mm Samyang on Olympus (1600mm). The main problem was to get the subject into the frame. You move the camera left-right, up-down, and you do not find the subject. :)
Another problem was when I had big subjects like a heron or stork, I had to be minimum 50 meters away of the subject to have it 100% in the frame. From 10-15 meters I could do only "head-shots".

This is a movie I did with E-5 + 800mm Samyang and you can see that I had some problems with geting the subject entirely into the frame:


Night heron by Samyang 800mm F/8.0 mirror lens - YouTube

IamFisheye
20th December 2015, 09:08 AM
I went to the exhibition yesterday. One image was taken with a GX7 & 7-14mm, everything else was Cannon & Nikon. Mostly top end stuff 1Dx, 5D III, D4 & D810s with big primes. There were a few exceptions with people using mid range kit.

It was amazing to see what kit some of the junior finalists were using. All I can say is I could have never of afforded it on my paper round earnings when I was a lad.

There are a people moving towards m4/3 for wildlife and I think it's predominantly to reduce weight given that light aircraft used for internal flights have luggage limits around 12-15kg. I've used my EM-1 on 3 safaris now (although I also now have a Nikon which replaced my E-3). I also took a EP-2 to the Galapagos as there was lots of walking and I didn't want to hump 2 large SLRs and lenses up and down volcanoes in the tropical heat.

drmarkf
20th December 2015, 02:50 PM
It was amazing to see what kit some of the junior finalists were using. All I can say is I could have never of afforded it on my paper round earnings when I was a lad.

They undoubtedly have wealthy, ambitious and pushy parents, but maybe I'm being a bit cynical ;)

I think it's predominantly to reduce weight given that light aircraft used for internal flights have luggage limits around 12-15kg.

Yes, I did the same on our trip earlier this year to S Africa & Malawi - it meant I could carry 2 E-M1 bodies and a range of lenses from fisheye to 420mm FF equivalent and still take a reasonable amount of clothing!

The only real difficulties c.f. a DSLR were limited ISO capability, and weak CAF + tracking for birds in flight.

Rocknroll59
5th January 2016, 09:08 AM
Any chance we could start our own competition for m4/3 users only, i've seen some superb wildlife pics on this site since joining in 2010....perhaps Olympus could run it??

Peter ;)