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Homer Simpson
12th October 2015, 04:28 PM
I am a bit of a dinosaur with my cameras, I treat my E1 like an electronic OM 2n :D

It tends to live on iso 100 mainly

What standard setting should I put the epl5 on without loosing any IQ
I am aware I can push it very high and will do as required

Graham_of_Rainham
12th October 2015, 04:39 PM
I normally use 200 as it's what I used in the old film days

However: I discovered Auto ISO and have some good shots at well over 1000

*chr

Homer Simpson
12th October 2015, 04:52 PM
200 is my default on the 520.

PeterBirder
12th October 2015, 07:30 PM
ISO 200 is believed to be the "native" or inherent sensitivity of the Sony sensors in the OMD/PEN range and should therefore give optimum IQ. The E-M1 which I understand uses a Panasonic sensor may be different. ISO LOW/ISO 100 is an "extension" which is achieved electronically is thought to cause a reduction in dynamic range.

Like Graham I use Auto ISO with an upper limit of ISO 1600 and have been quite happy with the results.

Regards.*chr

IainMacD
12th October 2015, 09:49 PM
Same settings for me on my m4/3 cameras (including E-PL5), ISO200 as default with a limit of 1600 when using Auto, it seems to work well. I have used low (100) ISO but it does reduce dynamic range quite dramatically.

Daveart
13th October 2015, 12:35 PM
Hi I have the em5 mk 1 I set my upper limit to 6400 ISO get good quality A3 sized print from them, as for dynamic range it is lower to about E3 range at 400 ISO.
Club members think it is incredible that the 4/3rdssystem could produce such quality at that ISO, they all thought that we could only get useable upto 800 ISO.

I am constantly asked what noise reduction software I use, when I tell them don't use noise reduction software, or sharpening.

Dave

OM USer
13th October 2015, 12:41 PM
I use auto ISO with a maximum of ISO 2000 as my default setting, pushing it a little more if I need to.

Walti
13th October 2015, 01:50 PM
Following on from my previous cameras I've always kept the ISO as low as possible, but have been using ISO1600 for wildlife in low light conditions and am VERY surprised by the IQ. Also took one in a tunnel at 25600... Grainy but good!

Robin in the evening, not post processed 1600

http://www.e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/1960/PA040460.jpg

Tunnel by torchlight...

http://www.e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/1960/PA070810.jpg

Ulfric M Douglas
13th October 2015, 05:47 PM
... E1 ...
It tends to live on iso 100 mainly

What standard setting should I put the epl5 on without loosing any IQ
I am aware I can push it very high and will do as required
With that sensor I myself don't see any image degradation until ISO 1600,
but I'm easy to please and set my auto-ISO limit to 6400 anyway for the very dark times.

My E-1 is set to ISO 100 all the time.
My e-P1 and e-P2 are set to ISO 200 with ISO-bracket all the time.

Homer Simpson
14th October 2015, 05:35 PM
Thanks to everyone, looks like I was on the right track.

timboo
14th October 2015, 08:22 PM
Interesting topic, thanks for starting it. Im scared of upping the iso when using my 12-40 i just give up when light dims. i have only gone upto 800. Should i push it a lot harder?
when i used the 75 1.8 it was amazing in low light so kept it low. i always try with iso 200 then stop down.

so my question is i have not printed a3 size before what is the safest iso i can get away with without noticing noise. think i have got obsessed with online reviews recently.

my body is an em1

Ross the fiddler
15th October 2015, 12:03 AM
I'm another one to use Auto ISO limiting up to 6400.

All photos in this thread (http://e-group.uk.net/forum/showthread.php?t=39745) except for the flash ones are at ISO 6400 on E-M5 & E-M1 (but that is the Panasonic sensor though).

This is one of the photos from the E-M5 in that thread (the focus might not be totally on the eyes or there head is movement causing the blur).
http://fourthirds-user.com/galleries/data/509/OA129939-s.jpg (http://fourthirds-user.com/galleries/showphoto.php/photo/29967)

timboo
15th October 2015, 05:12 AM
I'm another one to use Auto ISO limiting up to 6400.

All photos in this thread (http://e-group.uk.net/forum/showthread.php?t=39745) except for the flash ones are at ISO 6400 on E-M5 & E-M1 (but that is the Panasonic sensor though).

This is one of the photos from the E-M5 in that thread (the focus might not be totally on the eyes or there head is movement causing the blur).
http://fourthirds-user.com/galleries/data/509/OA129939-s.jpg (http://fourthirds-user.com/galleries/showphoto.php/photo/29967)


excuse my ignorance do all em1 s have panasonic sensors? is 6400 perfectly good for printing a3 cheers.

Ross the fiddler
15th October 2015, 05:47 AM
excuse my ignorance do all em1 s have panasonic sensors? is 6400 perfectly good for printing a3 cheers.

All E-M1's have the Panasonic sensor with the added PD-AF on sensor pixels & the rest of the models from the E-M5 onwards have the Sony 16mp sensor which actually performs a little better (than the E-M1) for long exposures without Noise Reduction on.

timboo
15th October 2015, 06:12 AM
All E-M1's have the Panasonic sensor with the added PD-AF on sensor pixels & the rest of the models from the E-M5 onwards have the Sony 16mp sensor which actually performs a little better (than the E-M1) for long exposures without Noise Reduction on.

thanks will 6400 be ok then on em1 at long or short

Ross the fiddler
15th October 2015, 07:29 AM
thanks will 6400 be ok then on em1 at long or short

I think so, but others may not like to go that far with either camera. Check my linked thread above (as well as my gallery in 4/3's User) as it has a number of photos from the E-M1 (at ISO 6400).

timboo
15th October 2015, 03:49 PM
Found this review re printing
relates to em-1


Print Quality

Excellent 30 x 40 inch prints at ISO 100/200; a good 16 x 20 at ISO 1600; a nice 8 x 10 at ISO 6400; and a good 4 x 6 at ISO 25,600.

ISO 100/200 produces excellent 30 x 40 inch prints, with sharp detail and vibrant colors, and wall display prints possible at 36 x 48 inches.

ISO 400 prints look nice and crisp at 20 x 30 inches, with good wall display prints possible up to 30 x 40 inches.

ISO 800 also yields nice 20 x 30s, with only mild softening in the red channel and minor luminance noise in some flatter areas.

ISO 1,600 shots look amazingly good at 16 x 20 inches, a large size indeed for this ISO.

ISO 3,200 prints well up to 11 x 14 inches. All contrast is now lost in our target red swatch, and there is minor noise in shadowy areas, but still a nice print.

ISO 6,400 images have good color and nice detail at 8 x 10 inches, with only minor issues similar to the 11 x 14 at ISO 3200.

ISO 12,800 has become our new benchmark for image quality at high ISOs if the camera can yield a good 5 x 7 here, and the E-M1 joins this small club with a nice print.

ISO 25,600 prints at 4 x 6 have amazing color for such a high ISO.

With their latest offering the OM-D E-M1, Olympus has followed in the hallowed footsteps of the E-M5 and taken the quality yet a step further. Prints from the E-M1 are a joy to look at, and can yield sizes ranging from quite large at and near base ISO all the way to a good 4 x 6 at ISO 25,600. A very solid performance from a very respected offering. Again, please note that default JPEG sharpening in the E-M1 is considerably less aggressive than in the E-M5, but the images are quite similar in RAW comparisons, so take that into consideration when doing your own comparisons of the in-camera JPEGs.

Testing hundreds of digital cameras, we've found that you can only tell just so much about a camera's image quality by viewing its images on-screen. Ultimately, there's no substitute for printing a lot of images and examining them closely. For this reason, we now routinely print sample images from the cameras we test on our Canon Pro9000 Mark II studio printer, and the Canon Pixma MP610 here in the office. (See the Canon Pixma Pro9000 Mark II review for details on that model.)


info from the following

http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/olympus-e-m1/olympus-e-m1A5.HTM