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View Full Version : The Dead Pig Episode (Warning - Political)


Zuiko
27th September 2015, 01:16 AM
Whilst I find the allegations that David Cameron, in his student days, had an intimate encounter with a pig's head both amusing and disturbing I wouldn't read too much into them. It was a long time ago, he was young and it's the type of high jinks and tomfoolery that you might expect from students of a certain background whom have been raised to believe they are part of an exclusive elite.

What I find more worrying is his membership of the Bullingdon Club in his younger days, a club which apparently has a far more political ethos of flaunting wealth and despising poorer people from the lower classes. It explains a lot about the policies which the Conservative Party have adopted under Cameron's leadership.

It is claimed that one MP who was once invited to join the Bullingdon Club said he walked out of a gathering in disgust. “What it basically involved was getting drunk and standing on restaurant tables, shouting about ‘f***ing plebs’. It was all about despising poor people,” he is reported to have told the Daily Mail.

The above phrase in bold is my emphasis; Cameron may or may not despise poor people but he certainly neither understands nor cares about them. It seems to be mainly anecdotal conjecture that he once "made" a pig's head, but it is my opinion that his Government is making a pig's ear out of our economy and society and I certainly won't be able to look at a picture of him in future without thinking "Oink!"

Grumpy Hec
27th September 2015, 06:26 AM
Well said John.

There is much about what this government is embarked on which I find deeply disturbing and I believe a great deal of it is rooted in the type of long held attitudes you describe.

Hec

raymondo
27th September 2015, 08:50 AM
well said John, Here here.

SteveJ
27th September 2015, 01:43 PM
Well said everyone so far............ How he could walk into a room full of world leaders and expect to be taken seriously, is beyond me. The world is laughing at him and us.......

Steve

drmarkf
27th September 2015, 02:19 PM
The current lot justify ignoring the poor (i.e. the 99.5% of the population who earn less than they do) by claiming that "a rising tide lifts all boats", hence in their view the rapidly widening inequality within UK society doesn't matter.

Apart from their being no worthwhile evidence to support this convenient but widely-held belief, it was pointed out in a lecture I went to yesterday on climate change and economics that this growth-centred model is entirely unsustainable within the planet's resources.

In other words, before long that rising tide is going to flood the City of London.

So I hope those pigs can swim, as well as fly ;)

Wally
27th September 2015, 02:32 PM
... So I hope those pigs can swim, as well as fly ;)

I pray I'm not in a minority when I say I hope they can do neither.

cliff
27th September 2015, 07:03 PM
Will that story be DAVE'S APORKALIPS ?

Jim Ford
27th September 2015, 07:15 PM
What I find more worrying is his membership of the Bullingdon Club in his younger days, a club which apparently has a far more political ethos of flaunting wealth and despising poorer people from the lower classes. It explains a lot about the policies which the Conservative Party have adopted under Cameron's leadership.

I read somewhere that as part of the initiation into the Bullingdon Club, you have to burn a £50 note in front of a beggar.

I don't have words describing how much I despise this government!

Jim

drmarkf
27th September 2015, 07:47 PM
Yeah.
I'm with the maitre d' from Ferris Bueller's Day Off.

I weep for the human race.

Zuiko
27th September 2015, 08:41 PM
Will that story be DAVE'S APORKALIPS ?

That was nearly a coffee on keyboard moment! :D

Zuiko
27th September 2015, 08:44 PM
I read somewhere that as part of the initiation into the Bullingdon Club, you have to burn a £50 note in front of a beggar.

I don't have words describing how much I despise this government!

Jim

That may just be an urban legend, but if true it is despicable on numerous levels. :mad:

If it is true, maybe we should bitch-slap members of the Bullingdon Club (past and present) in front of their parents. *yes

Wee man
27th September 2015, 08:54 PM
Do they know who they are?

Zuiko
27th September 2015, 08:57 PM
Do they know who they are?

Most of them know their mothers, but I'm not sure about their fathers....... :rolleyes:

Jim Ford
27th September 2015, 09:35 PM
If it is true, maybe we should bitch-slap members of the Bullingdon Club (past and present) in front of their parents. *yes

'Bitch-slap' them with a couple of rounds of 7.62 more like!

Jim

Zuiko
27th September 2015, 09:47 PM
'Bitch-slap' them with a couple of rounds of 7.62 more like!

Jim

I don't wish serious injury or death for them, just public humiliation and resignation. Whoops, Dave seems to have achieved the first one all by himself (with a little help from the pig). Hopefully the second will follow before too long.

Looking back to the last election, it now seems ironic that so much was made in the media about Ed's penchant for eating bacon sandwiches when all along Dave apparently preferred the bacon to be eating him! :D

Harold Gough
28th September 2015, 07:52 AM
This is a clear case of character assassination. He should apologise to the pig's family.

Harold

Crazy Dave
28th September 2015, 07:53 AM
Mmmm. Trial and verdict provoked by an unsubstantiated allegation fuelled by the media about a small number of teenage prats. Cameron and company are not perfect and did you see the lineup of US Republican presidential hopefuls? I'm no apologist but from where I sit, the deficiencies of this government will not be rectified by the current alternative on offer. I shudder when thinking about the Blair - Brown fiasco, the Damian McBride viciousness, war criminality, the foulness of the party attacks on Alistair Darling and the legacy of the idiotic Miliband.
I hope this thread will run and run, great fun.

David

Zuiko
28th September 2015, 08:17 AM
Mmmm. Trial and verdict provoked by an unsubstantiated allegation fuelled by the media about a small number of teenage prats. Cameron and company are not perfect and did you see the lineup of US Republican presidential hopefuls? I'm no apologist but from where I sit, the deficiencies of this government will not be rectified by the current alternative on offer. I shudder when thinking about the Blair - Brown fiasco, the Damian McBride viciousness, war criminality, the foulness of the party attacks on Alistair Darling and the legacy of the idiotic Miliband.
I hope this thread will run and run, great fun.

David

Hi David, in my opening post I tried to put the alleged incident into perspective:-

"Whilst I find the allegations that David Cameron, in his student days, had an intimate encounter with a pig's head both amusing and disturbing I wouldn't read too much into them. It was a long time ago, he was young and it's the type of high jinks and tomfoolery that you might expect from students of a certain background whom have been raised to believe they are part of an exclusive elite."

However, I am sure you can appreciate that it was too good an opportunity to let pass without comment for someone like myself who is certainly no Cameron fan! :D

And have you seen the latest episode of "Mock The Week?" :eek: :eek: *laugh

I also notice that the rebuttals and denials coming from Downing Street are not exactly deafening........:rolleyes:

But thanks for posting an alternative view to keep the thread in balance. :)

Harold Gough
28th September 2015, 08:32 AM
Mmmm. Trial and verdict provoked by an unsubstantiated allegation fuelled by the media about a small number of teenage prats. Cameron and company are not perfect and did you see the lineup of US Republican presidential hopefuls? I'm no apologist but from where I sit, the deficiencies of this government will not be rectified by the current alternative on offer. I shudder when thinking about the Blair - Brown fiasco, the Damian McBride viciousness, war criminality, the foulness of the party attacks on Alistair Darling and the legacy of the idiotic Miliband.
I hope this thread will run and run, great fun.

David

Thinking of political history, was the Bay of Pigs incident about something else altogether and the military disaster story a cover-up? :D

Harold

Crazy Dave
28th September 2015, 10:16 AM
[QUOTE But thanks for posting an alternative view to keep the thread in balance. :)[/QUOTE]

Your're welcome. I have Libran traits, balance is what we do. What Cameron and his fellow politicians need is a high-dose common sense injection but even then I wonder about the lasting effects. I berated our local MP (Tory and complacent) for handing out teeth rotting gob stoppers from his stall in our local high street. He was only yards from a green grocers shop laden with fruit. When confronted, he gave a typical, 'sh**y', politician's answer. "I haven't given any out this morning". On Saturday, I noticed he had apples on his stall, if only it were that easy to influence them on the big issues.

Thanks for starting the post and your gracious reply.


David

Naughty Nigel
28th September 2015, 01:55 PM
Presumably the answer to all of this is to paint bomb a privately run breakfast bar in the east of London? :(

How does that make everything all right? :confused:

BBC Report (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-34373957)

Zuiko
28th September 2015, 03:06 PM
Presumably the answer to all of this is to paint bomb a privately run breakfast bar in the east of London? :(

How does that make everything all right? :confused:

BBC Report (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-34373957)

Hmmm, at first I couldn't see the connection with this thread but then I read that the "protestors" were wearing Cameron masks and carrying pigs' heads - how bizarre.

I suppose I could make the observation that when street protestors wreck a shop it's mindless vandalism but when the Bullingdon Club wreck a restaurant it's high jinks. However, the truth is that neither of these types of behaviour is acceptable and both are utterly pointless. Why target a breakfast bar for goodness sake? If the prices are too high eat somewhere else. I find this report particularly sad because only a few weeks ago I enjoyed a great day of street photography with my daughter around the Shoreditch and Brick Lane area. :(

Naughty Nigel
28th September 2015, 05:29 PM
Hmmm, at first I couldn't see the connection with this thread but then I read that the "protestors" were wearing Cameron masks and carrying pigs' heads - how bizarre.

I suppose I could make the observation that when street protestors wreck a shop it's mindless vandalism but when the Bullingdon Club wreck a restaurant it's high jinks. However, the truth is that neither of these types of behaviour is acceptable and both are utterly pointless. Why target a breakfast bar for goodness sake? If the prices are too high eat somewhere else. I find this report particularly sad because only a few weeks ago I enjoyed a great day of street photography with my daughter around the Shoreditch and Brick Lane area. :(

This whole episode seems utterly pointless to me.

I heard a comment from a listener on the Vine Show today who said that it was "a disgrace that the breakfast bar was charging £5.00 for a bowl of cereals when children living in the east end of London couldn't afford breakfast". Well perhaps the proprietor wants to be able to feed his own children?

Maybe someone should tell these people that breakfast cereals and milk can be bought much more cheaply from supermarkets. If they spent less time eating at McDonalds they might realise this, and might even have half a brain.

Do they also realise that if the breakfast bar was to sell at supermarket prices they wouldn't have a business? End of.

I am not a great fan of Cameron & Co (it is not my brand of conservatism), but frankly, the alternatives we have at present are unthinkable.

What worries me more is that the politics of Jeremy Corbyn, John McDonnell, Kerry McCarthy & Co. seem to signal that not only is it OK for the reds to come out from under their beds, but that it is perfectly OK for them to launch precisely these sort of mindless attacks; presumably to persuade us all that theirs is is the kind of society that we should all be living in. :(

Those with longer memories will remember that the Labour party was very, very slow indeed to criticise violent protests during Mrs Thatcher's premiership; indeed, there was plenty of evidence to support the view that their members not only supported such behaviour but actively orchestrated it.

SteveJ
28th September 2015, 07:50 PM
[QUOTE=

What worries me more is that the politics of Jeremy Corbyn, John McDonnell, Kerry McCarthy & Co. seem to signal that not only is it OK for the reds to come out from under their beds, but that it is perfectly OK for them to launch precisely these sort of mindless attacks; presumably to persuade us all that theirs is is the kind of society that we should all be living in. :(
[/QUOTE]

My god have you ever thought of writing for the Sun or Daily Mail. What a load of rubbish....................

Steve

Naughty Nigel
28th September 2015, 07:58 PM
My god have you ever thought of writing for the Sun or Daily Mail. What a load of rubbish....................

Steve

So you condone the sort of behaviour that we were discussing above then? :(

Why is it only the Lefties that seem to be allowed an opinion around here? You have proved my point well, thank you.

SteveJ
28th September 2015, 08:19 PM
Typical Right wing answer..... Read the quote i posted ..... I never condoned these actions and in fact i don't.

Steve

Zuiko
28th September 2015, 10:21 PM
Now let's keep it civil on here. There are bound to be a wide range of differing opinions and opposing political leanings on a forum like this and it's highly unlikely that anyone will change their opinions as a result of what others have posted. Therefore there is little point in making the comments personal; it will only result in a light-hearted discussion turning acrimonious, with no winners.

Although deep rooted, ingrained political beliefs will seldom change (I originally typed never change but then remembered that I used to be a Thatcherite), I believe it can be useful to at least try looking at various issues from someone else's perspective.

In particular I think that Nigel and I have proved this in the past, often forming some sort of consensus or at least gaining a better understanding of each other's problems and the way in which government policies can affect them. Neither of us is likely to change our overall political principles but I like to think we enjoy a mutual respect even in disagreement and I encourage everyone to aspire to this, even though I understand the passion that can be generated through the perception of social injustice.

Ultimately, discussions will be more constructive and the points we make will carry far greater weight if we remain calm, polite and respectful. Think how much more effective the House of Commons could be if our elected representatives were to adopt the same ethos! :)

Wee man
28th September 2015, 10:31 PM
Here, here!

Naughty Nigel
28th September 2015, 10:56 PM
Now let's keep it civil on here. There are bound to be a wide range of differing opinions and opposing political leanings on a forum like this and it's highly unlikely that anyone will change their opinions as a result of what others have posted. Therefore there is little point in making the comments personal; it will only result in a light-hearted discussion turning acrimonious, with no winners.

Thank you for your kind words of wisdom John.

In my view it is a mark of civility and professionalism that people should be able to disagree on the most fundamental issues without actually falling out.

I know from my professional experience that lawyers rub their hands with glee when disagreeing parties refuse to talk to one another. And oddly enough, most politicians are lawyers! *yes

Wally
29th September 2015, 08:12 AM
... lawyers rub their hands with glee when disagreeing parties refuse to talk to one another. And oddly enough, most politicians are lawyers! *yes

In many ways, this is the root cause of many of our problems. Most, if not all laws - of which we have far too many - that govern our way of life are overly complicated and convolute. If proof be needed, my personal experience was to have 'professionally completed' Benefit Forms for a terminally ill cancer patient, was to have them rejected? This creates a myriad of loop-holes to avoid prosecution for those that have the means and the power of position to abuse the system.

To resolve the problem, perhaps we should ban all those from the legal profession from being politicians. Why do I have a suspicion that somewhere, buried deep within the system there's a law against it. ;)

I'd like to have what I believe, is the Dutch system? 1000 laws and, for each new law introduced, one existing law must be discarded. *yes

Naughty Nigel
29th September 2015, 08:23 AM
But the Dutch always have a contingency for everything. *yes

(Which is why they have been so successful in shipbuilding and aircraft engineering.)

I should also mention that whilst our politicians like to tear lumps out of each other in the Commons (and the courtroom), most are good friends outside of the debating chambers.

Wally
29th September 2015, 08:48 AM
Having gone back to the original post, it got me thinking... just where, did the sexual term, 'having porkies' originate? *yo - *yo , ;) - ;) know what I mean? *yes