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Jim Ford
3rd September 2015, 03:51 PM
Just gave up watching after 5min. the last Horizon programme (the one about parallel universes)!

It was narrated by a woman with a hushed breathy voice that was difficult to follow. Turning the volume up didn't help with the clarity. My wife, who has better hearing than mine, also found it not easy to follow.

BBC seem to be fond of doing this sort of thing these days. There's often a male narrator who tapers off his voice to a near inaudible whisper at significant moments, possibly in an an attempt to give added gravitas to the point being made. Instead, it just obscures the point!

The science in these programmes is often not easy to follow - why make it more difficult by delivering it in an unclear manner?!

Jim

DerekW
3rd September 2015, 04:10 PM
Come on - Name and Shame them - so that we can enjoy your anger

Jim Ford
3rd September 2015, 04:26 PM
I don't know who the woman was - I only watched 5mins of the programme, so I didn't see the credits at the end. It's just so frustrating!

Jim

Zuiko
3rd September 2015, 07:59 PM
I've always found the hushed tones of David Attenborough easy enough to hear. There are others whom I would have difficulty understanding even if they were shouting.

Naughty Nigel
3rd September 2015, 08:34 PM
Radio Three presenters often seem to talk in hushed tones when introducing music that sounds reminiscent of an exploding vacuum cleaner, (no, not the Dyson in D), quietly explaining that it was written in the composers last days in a Siberian mental asylum. :eek:

They don't seem to use this technique when introducing music with harmonies and chordal progressions that can be enjoyed by us mere mortals. :)

Olybirder
3rd September 2015, 09:57 PM
I didn't watch the programme but it seems the lady in question was Katherine Parkinson. Perhaps they should have used Michael instead. Nobody could accuse him of having a hushed, breathy voice. :)

I have never heard of Katherine Parkinson but apparently she was in 'The IT Crowd'. Unfortunately I have never seen that programme either, so that is of no help to me.

Ron

David M
3rd September 2015, 10:49 PM
Wasn't she Pauline, the receptionist in Doc Martin?

IanB
4th September 2015, 02:11 AM
music on tv docos is the killer for me.

I have some of the worse industrial hearing loss that hearing experts have seen and hearing aids don't help much. The real drama is I have lost most high frequency hearing but still have 1/2 the lower frequency hearing much makes me sort of sort tone deaf.
In a quiet environment I can talk one to one and most will not notice I am considered "profoundly" deaf; however throw in a couple of others or some back ground noise or someone behind me talking and then I'm totally buggered!

So pubs/clubs are out and phones are a problem also. Now add bloody music to quiet TV shows and that's a big problem yet I often have my TV volume lower then many others do. In fact I cannot handle the louder boom boom (low frequency) music. I was never interested in the loud rock music

I have often noticed narrators talking in the field will often not have background music but as soon as they add a studio voice-over they add damn music. WHY??

Don't get me started with stupid music on the wild seas/boats/fishing/rescue/monster machinery/truck type programs. What hell are they on to think they need such stupid load and annoying music

And why the whispering voices on animal docos which I watch a lot of.

So I can certainly understand your post Jim. I have sent off numerous letters about the subject but they seem to have their own arty way of doing it and we the viewers are not important .

Sorry; my rant over! *chr

sapper
4th September 2015, 06:23 AM
Complain to the broadcasters, if enough do that, maybe they will take notice.

Wee man
4th September 2015, 08:00 AM
Agree the unnecessary background music and the change in volume when the ads come on.

DerekW
4th September 2015, 08:22 AM
IanB - Have you investigated taking the TV sound through a separate amplifier and speaker and applying a graphic equaliser to it to cut the low frequencies and boost the frequencies you can usefully hear.

PeterBirder
4th September 2015, 08:40 AM
*shrugmusic on tv docos is the killer for me.

I have some of the worse industrial hearing loss that hearing experts have seen and hearing aids don't help much. The real drama is I have lost most high frequency hearing but still have 1/2 the lower frequency hearing much makes me sort of sort tone deaf.
In a quiet environment I can talk one to one and most will not notice I am considered "profoundly" deaf; however throw in a couple of others or some back ground noise or someone behind me talking and then I'm totally buggered!

So pubs/clubs are out and phones are a problem also. Now add bloody music to quiet TV shows and that's a big problem yet I often have my TV volume lower then many others do. In fact I cannot handle the louder boom boom (low frequency) music. I was never interested in the loud rock music

I have often noticed narrators talking in the field will often not have background music but as soon as they add a studio voice-over they add damn music.

That's very similar to my situation and experience. I used to enjoy classical music but now my hearing even with hearing aids is such that I cannot hear the necessary harmonics to even identify an individual instrument. A familiar orchestral piece now sounds like a lot of discordant notes and the melody is completely unrecogniseable.*shrug

sapper
4th September 2015, 07:22 PM
Now a TV presenter has changed the way Calais is pronounced, Calay. On 'Tonight', ITV 1.

Miketoll
5th September 2015, 06:08 PM
Just gave up watching after 5min. the last Horizon programme (the one about parallel universes)!

It was narrated by a woman with a hushed breathy voice that was difficult to follow. Turning the volume up didn't help with the clarity. My wife, who has better hearing than mine, also found it not easy to follow.

BBC seem to be fond of doing this sort of thing these days. There's often a male narrator who tapers off his voice to a near inaudible whisper at significant moments, possibly in an an attempt to give added gravitas to the point being made. Instead, it just obscures the point!

The science in these programmes is often not easy to follow - why make it more difficult by delivering it in an unclear manner?!

Jim

Maybe it was perfectly clear in another parallel Universe? :D