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Grumpy Hec
3rd September 2015, 06:59 AM
OK - stand by for a grumpy rant.

I know I'm getting older and I also know that my grumpiness is reaching epic proportions. Even allowing for that, the increased tendency for people to use the question inflection whilst making a statement is making me EVEN grumpier.

I now have a retort in my head which I'm desperate to use but I'm managing to resist. At least I have so far.

It goes like this when I hear that cursed inflection being used.

The offender - "I opened that door"

Me - "It's alright. You don't need to check that I understand the idea of opening that door over there. It's a simple concept so you can assume that I understand it.

I'm not a complete moron. Last time I did the measurements I had only achieved a moron score of 94%. However I am continuing to work hard at improving that already fairly good rating and I have a personal target of reaching 98% or even better by the end of the year.

I doubt I will manage that magic, seemingly unreachable, complete moron score of 100%. However if I do I will of course instantly recognise that life changing achievement by the unmistakable and reliable indicator of finishing every statement I make and sentence I speak with the question inflection."


Rant over.

Hec

Jim Ford
3rd September 2015, 08:13 AM
I agree with you entirely, 'Hec'!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_rising_terminal

The sentence is usually delivered in a near monotone, except for the 'rising terminal'.

It's often used by youngsters trying to sound 'cool Australian', but my experience is that 'real' Australians don't do it. In fact Germaine Greer has stated in the past that she finds it intensely irritating.

Another pet hate of mine is the American female voice that sounds to the casual listener just like a duck quacking!

Wally
3rd September 2015, 08:26 AM
I agree with you entirely, 'Hec'!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_rising_terminal

Another pet hate of mine is the American female voice that sounds to the casual listener just like a duck quacking!

Think yourself lucky that duck quacks don't echo. ;)

Zuiko
3rd September 2015, 08:28 AM
I totally agree with you ?

byegad
3rd September 2015, 08:42 AM
Drives me dotty too Hec. The continual need to check that it really wasn't a question makes speaking to the young a burden I avoid whenever possible.

I'd add that something else drives me mad about young women's speech in particular.

The very high pitched, almost 'little girl' voice delivered with an hard edge to it makes me boil. We were in York a few weeks ago and every female shop assistant had the same grating voice. Add the rising inflection at the end and I take grumpy to a whole new level.

Zuiko
3rd September 2015, 09:05 AM
We were in York a few weeks ago and every female shop assistant had the same grating voice.



That's the Yorkshire accent. (where's the Smilie for put on tin hat and dive for cover?) :eek: :D

PS - If you've yet to experience the Hull accent you're in for a treat. (Okay, now I need full body armour!) :eek: :eek: :eek:

sapper
3rd September 2015, 10:34 AM
My gripe is the 'yes, no' in answer to a question. I generally ask, 'do you mean yes, or no?"

Graham_of_Rainham
3rd September 2015, 10:38 AM
Working in schools and FE colleges, I have updated all my communication liveware to version 2015.9

I've also developed a variety of filters that remove superfluous; words, inflections, tonalities, etc..

*chr

Naughty Nigel
3rd September 2015, 12:51 PM
Working in schools and FE colleges, I have updated all my communication liveware to version 2015.9

I've also developed a variety of filters that remove superfluous; words, inflections, tonalities, etc..

*chr

Innit? :D

However, I find that most teenagers like to speak in an almost unintelligible mumble, and consider it distinctly 'uncool' if elders understand them first time around! :)

Jim Ford
3rd September 2015, 01:55 PM
The very high pitched, almost 'little girl' voice delivered with an hard edge to it makes me boil. We were in York a few weeks ago and every female shop assistant had the same grating voice. Add the rising inflection at the end and I take grumpy to a whole new level.

Do you mean speaking with a sort of grating or growl in the voice? I've noticed that with a lot of people - not just young girls. I also find it irritating!

JIm

KeithL
3rd September 2015, 05:28 PM
My grumpiness goes into orbit when I encounter actors in a TV drama mumbling! I can't lip read, so I find that I get about 50% or less of the dialogue.

Compound that with over-loud background music, and I could cheerfully chuck the TV through the window (except it would break the window, and I don't have any bad feelings about the window....)

Then there are people on quiz shows who clearly know nothing, and give an obviously silly answer (delivered with the rising inflection!) and then laugh like a drain when they are told they are wrong - as if it's somehow funny and clever because they have less than one brain cell.....:mad::mad::mad:

Crazy Dave
3rd September 2015, 07:29 PM
It's not only about the rising inflection but where the emphasis is made. Hence, with increasing frequency especially with some BBC presenters, we have hospitall, metall, possiball, it drives me mentall.

Agree about the American females who sounded as if they are on helium and there's also the OMG idiocy.

Keep it up Hec! On second thoughts, that may appear personall.

David

George Dorn
3rd September 2015, 10:06 PM
Which moron decided that we all need deep bass music in the background on BBC local radio traffic announcements or weather reports innit.

Naughty Nigel
3rd September 2015, 10:13 PM
Which moron decided that we all need deep bass music in the background on BBC local radio traffic announcements or weather reports innit.

Probably the same moron who thought it was a bright idea to herald the travel news with 'sound effects'; including at one point, a police siren and (I think) a train sounding its horn. :eek:

The first time I heard it I was driving fairly briskly across the A66, minding my own business with nothing in my rear view mirror when I heard the wail of a police siren. To say that I nearly needed a change of underwear would be an understatement! *yes

Zuiko
3rd September 2015, 10:36 PM
Probably the same moron who thought it was a bright idea to herald the travel news with 'sound effects'; including at one point, a police siren and (I think) a train sounding its horn. :eek:

The first time I heard it I was driving fairly briskly across the A66, minding my own business with nothing in my rear view mirror when I heard the wail of a police siren. To say that I nearly needed a change of underwear would be an understatement! *yes

Nigel, you are naughty! :D

IanB
4th September 2015, 02:23 AM
my word we are becoming an old grumpy lot with cameras :eek: ! I thought I was the only real crunky old bugga :rolleyes: *laugh

Phill D
4th September 2015, 06:18 AM
Pretty impressive grumpy thread you started here Hec. I do agree with all of it though so somehow it doesn't seem grumpy to me at all :rolleyes:
Old Gits Rule OK :eek:

byegad
4th September 2015, 07:07 AM
That's the Yorkshire accent. (where's the Smilie for put on tin hat and dive for cover?) :eek: :D

PS - If you've yet to experience the Hull accent you're in for a treat. (Okay, now I need full body armour!) :eek: :eek: :eek:


Sadly no! We were up in Northumberland last week and they're shop assistants have all got 'THE VOICE' too. My sister was in Jersey and met it there.

There's even a TV presenter with no regional accent that has thet piping/grating/ruddyannoying voice, complete with rising inflection on every sentence ending.

sapper
4th September 2015, 07:57 AM
The BBC reporting, 'The BBC said', or, 'Unison said".
Wouldn't mind if they were ignorant savages, but I bet the announcers have degrees in English, goodness knows where from though.

Bikie John
4th September 2015, 08:07 AM
I wonder if one of the inflections that we are talking about here is "vocal fry". I've seen a few newspaper articles about it but am not aware of having heard it (youth fashions take a long time to reach darkest Wessex). There is plenty about it on the web if you can be bothered - or can bear to listen to examples!

John

Naughty Nigel
4th September 2015, 08:27 AM
Maybe they all watch too many Australian soap operas? :(