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View Full Version : Which one ? 8mm or 7-14mm


Invicta
28th May 2015, 05:30 PM
If you could buy just one which would it be and why?


Olympus 8 mm M.ZUIKO f1.8 Fisheye

Olympus 7-14 mm M.ZUIKO f2.8


Looking at the specs only it would seem the 7-14 would cover the same angle of view as the 8mm.

Olympus must have a reason for producing the 8mm, does the 8mm give a different result to the 7-14 set to 8mm? e.g. is the 8mm Fisheye going to give a circular image?

I am puzzled as to the use of the 8mm hence my post asking for your thoughts.

pdk42
28th May 2015, 05:58 PM
I'd be surprised if the AOV of the 8 isn't wider than the 7-14. Also, f1.8 gathers about three times the light of f2.8. It your into astrophotography, that matters a lot.

OM USer
28th May 2015, 07:24 PM
A fisheye should give 180 degree angle of view and indeed the Olympus one does. I have not seen any examples but that could be 180 on the diagonal so you get a rectangular image or it could be 180 degrees on the vertical in which case you get a circular image. The construction of a fisheye means that you can not use the focal length as aguide to the AOV.

I (personaly) would go for the 7-14mm as it is going to give a rectilinear image rather than trying to de-fish a fisheye image and I do far more interior shots than funny perspective ones and any night sky shots always tend to be bounded by trees so a true 180 degreee view would be wasted on me.

Invicta
28th May 2015, 08:58 PM
Thanks for the info, OM User provides a great explanation.

I looked at the Nikon fisheye and it is a 16mm and Nikon have a 14-24mm ultra wide angle zoom so there is obviously something different about the fish eye and OM User's explanation clears up this confusion.

PeterBirder
28th May 2015, 09:22 PM
The 8mm Fisheye is a "full frame" fisheye which produces an image circle larger than the sensor to give a rectangular, but distorted image. The diagonal angle of view is 180 degrees. "Circular" fisheye lenses (not produced for m4/3) produce an image circle smaller than the sensor and give a circular image with 180 degree FOV in all directions. The 8mm probably has "equisolid angle" mapping so that each pixel "sees" light which subtends an equal solid angle.

See here re. fisheye lenses in general.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fisheye_lens

The 7-14 mm lens has a diagonal angle of view of 114 degrees @ 7mm.

Regards.

yorky
29th May 2015, 08:21 AM
is the 8mm a much better lens than the Samsung 7.5???????

mstphoto
29th May 2015, 08:34 AM
7-14 for me.
I love wide angle lenses for landscapes.
Being fairly new to this m4/3 game I enjoy using the 9-18.
Now if only the 7-14 was the same size as the 9-18 :D
Still a fairly big lens.
The reason for switching to the M4/3 system for me was to reduce size and weight.

Although I enjoy seeing fisheye images, I find the guide price for the 8mm a tad high for a lens that I'd only use once in a blue moon for gimmicy purposes but that doesn't mean it won't be the ideal lens for some photographers.

Mike

tomphotofx
29th May 2015, 08:38 AM
I've always found in life you get what you pay for with a few exceptions ie the 1.8 45mm Olympus exceptional quality at a terrific price.

Back to the main question I'd buy the 7-14mm because it would get used more than the 8mm considering my style of photography.

Tom

mstphoto
29th May 2015, 08:42 AM
is the 8mm a much better lens than the Samsung 7.5???????

Don't know about the Samsung 7.5mm but I have a Samyang 14mm for my Canons and it is one helluva sharp lens.
Images I've seen on Flickr taken with the Samyang 7.5mm are equally stunning.
I wouldn't say no to this lens at around a third of the price of the Olympus ;)
Non AF & Stabilization wouldn't be a problem due to focus peaking and in-camera stability

Mike

Zuiko
29th May 2015, 08:42 AM
is the 8mm a much better lens than the Samsung 7.5???????

Optically, probably not - but it does have AF for what it's worth on this type of lens.

Invicta
30th May 2015, 10:12 PM
There are some sample photos taken with the Oly 8mm fisheye in this mini review:

http://slrgear.com/reviews/showproduct.php?product=1799

mstphoto
31st May 2015, 06:25 AM
Looks like a quality lens but for the very few times I would use it I'd be as well using the Fisheye effect in the SCN mode :D

martyjward
31st May 2015, 09:21 AM
Of the two, I would go for the 7-14 quite simple because it would get more use. Unless you need the pro features, the Samyang 7.5 mm fisheye (which I am getting) seems to be a great option.

mstphoto
31st May 2015, 09:49 AM
I've got the Samyang 14 for use on my FF Canon - it has to be one of the sharpest lenses I have.
I totally agree that the 7.5mm m4/3 version would make sense.
Looking forward to seeing your images marty ;)

Mike

jamespetts
1st June 2015, 09:34 PM
is the 8mm a much better lens than the Samsung 7.5???????

No, but it has autofocus, auto aperture and is weather sealed. It is also a lot heavier, however, and the Samyang has a slightly wider angle of view (being a 7.5mm rather than an 8mm) Panasonic also produce an 8mm fisheye lens that is autofocus and auto aperture but without the weather sealing, and is lighter than the new Olympus lens.

I read a review comparing the Panasonic and the Samyang a while ago, and the reviewer was of the opinion that the Samyang was fractionally better optically but the difference was so small as not much to matter. I doubt that the Olympus will be in a different league optically, so it is probably only worth buying over the Panasonic if weather sealing is important, and the Panasonic is only worth buying over the Samyang if autofocus and auto aperture is worth the additional price.

Edit: I forgot to add: one important advantage of the Olympus lens is that, unlike the Samyang and Panasonic lenses, which are f/3.5 maximum aperture, the Olympus is f/1.8, so will be better for low light work and for producing a shallower depth of field, if this is desired. Fisheye lenses are not commonly used either in low light situations or to produce a shallow depth of field, so these advantages are perhaps not as important as with other types of lens, but they may be important to some people.

yorky
2nd June 2015, 12:27 PM
I my experiance with Samyang if you stop down 2 stops everything is pretty much in focus at infinity and very sharp at that. I can't really think that a 1.8 lens is much of an advantage considering the huge differance in price. I its just down to how much you will out of using the lens and how often!

pdk42
2nd June 2015, 04:34 PM
Fisheye lenses are not commonly used either in low light situations or to produce a shallow depth of field, so these advantages are perhaps not as important as with other types of lens, but they may be important to some people.

That may be true for general photography, but if you like wide-field astrophotography (think shots of milky way), then a wide fisheye is pretty useful.

jamespetts
2nd June 2015, 08:34 PM
That may be true for general photography, but if you like wide-field astrophotography (think shots of milky way), then a wide fisheye is pretty useful.

Interesting! Is Olympus after the astrophotography market with this lens, I wonder? I can see that this would be good for that very specialist but seemingly increasingly popular niche.

I wonder whether it is the advent of modern technology that makes astrophotography more practical that has made it more popular in the last decade or so than it used to be when I first became interested in photography as a hobby in the mid 1990s?

yorky
3rd June 2015, 08:11 AM
That may be true for general photography, but if you like wide-field astrophotography (think shots of milky way), then a wide fisheye is pretty useful.

Yes, I hadn't really thought of that as its not a field I have strayed into. YTou qare lucky to see the moon round these parts ;- (

Graham_of_Rainham
4th June 2015, 03:39 PM
I attended one of the Damian McGillicuddy events and he let me have use of both the 8mm and the 7-14mm.

While the 8mm is a superb lens, I personally would have little use for it and would probably hire one from Ian if I needed it.

The 7-14 is something else. Having owned and used the FT 7-14, this new MFT version is exactly what is wanted for anyone that wants to shoot Ultra Wide Angle.

*chr

Invicta
6th June 2015, 07:50 AM
Interesting and useful discussion on the two pro Oly wide angles.

I had the old four-thirds 7-14 which did not see much use but when I did use it was the only lens that would do the job.

I was hoping the 8mm fisheye would do the same ultra wide angle as 7mm end of the zoom and save on cost and weight in the camera bag. I now understand the 8mm is a 180 degree view, the effect would be useful to add a new and different view but it is not the same as the 7-14mm zoom.

I need to save up for the 7-14 first, maybe one day I will add the 8mm to get a different effect.