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PaulE
17th November 2008, 04:03 PM
For a number of reasons I missed most of the autumn colours, at least while it was at it's best / still on the trees etc. Anyway in an attempt to at least come up with something for the next friendly club competition (Autumn) I started messing with a few individual leaves in the comfort of the house :). Pictures by Danny H (http://e-group.uk.net/forum/showthread.php?t=3500) and Susan (http://e-group.uk.net/forum/showthread.php?t=3504) gave me the initial idea so thankyou to both for the inspiration. I bodged together a makeshift lightbox from an upturned lamp and one of them translucent plastic cutting boards and a few mins in PS I came up with this:

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/leaf.jpg (http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/10130)

So what's the verdict? worth entering or not?
Paul.

Ellie
17th November 2008, 05:23 PM
I think it's nice, I love the colour and the black background.

On my screen though, it looks a bit flat. I'm not sure if the 'composition' will inspire the judges. It's awfully difficult to photograph a single object, I don't think I've ever got it right so probably shouldn't say anything.

I wonder if you can go in really close to the leaf to get almost macro detail? Would that be any good?

DannyH
17th November 2008, 09:16 PM
I also like the color coming from the light box. It's hard to say what a judge will like. I just started a photo club late last year, and members with 10+ years experience are still baffled by what judges like and don't. We have a once a month meeting with 3 judges from another camera club to score our photo's. I was thrilled that one of my “fall abstract” images received a 27 last week (a perfect score). The judges said they had not seen colors that vibrant coming from a digital before. Good going Olympus.
I also did my first judging of another club last week and was scared to death I would screw up. The other two members of my club gave me a good way to help with the scores, see scoring below. They also said that each judge has a bias on what they like or don't like, but there is nothing wrong with that. For most photo's we came up with the same score, but there were a few that had a 7, 8 & 9 on the same image.

We score from a 1 to a 9, with 9 the highest. Below is the standard we use and I have only heard of "5" score being used once or twice.


1 - Use this score to disqualify an image. An image may be disqualified if it clearly infringes on another artist's copyright or if it is submitted for a category competition and you feel that it clearly does not fit.

2 - The image shows serious technical defects: gross under- or over-exposure, very poor focus or significant (and clearly unintended) camera movement, or similar problems.

3 - The image either has significant technical defects, serious shortcomings in image content, or some combination of these problems. Because most of the photographers who complete in 4Cs competitions have at least some photographic experience, this score and lower scores are rarely awarded in 4Cs competitions.

4 - The image does not have significant technical defects or serious shortcomings in image content. However, it may have minor technical defects, and the content (composition, lighting, etc.) is not well handled.

5 - The image is acceptable in most respects but does not create any significant interest.

6 - The image is reasonably solid, creating at least a little interest. Technical aspects and image content all competently handled. This is generally the average score for 4Cs competitions.

7 - The image is very strong. Handling is a notch above competent, and the image rewards contemplation.

8 - The image is exceptional: unique and worthy of special recognition. You should feel excited about the image.

9 - The image is of the very highest quality; equal to the beset you have seen. You feel that it should win a medal in salon competition or slide of the year in 4Cs competition. This score is awarded only rarely in 4Cs competitions

I hope that this will help you estimate where your image should be.