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Napper
22nd October 2008, 02:44 AM
Hi took this the other night. Not done many night shots so I thought I'd throw it open for comments. I'm always looking for ways to improve my photography so look forward to your comments

http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r69/norwich_napper/Olympus%20E-3/PA185154web.jpg

Ian
22nd October 2008, 06:24 AM
That's pretty good :)

Care to share the camera/lens settings?

Ian

theMusicMan
22nd October 2008, 06:33 AM
Cam: E-3
Shutter Speed: 3.2 seconds
Aperture: f5.6
ISO: 400
Lens: 24mm

Ian - do you have an EXIF viewer in your browser?

ndl0071
22nd October 2008, 07:00 AM
I like this, the reflection makes the picture for me, very nicely captured.

Neil

Ian
22nd October 2008, 07:28 AM
Cam: E-3
Shutter Speed: 3.2 seconds
Aperture: f5.6
ISO: 400
Lens: 24mm

Ian - do you have an EXIF viewer in your browser?

Haha! It was meant to be a bit of a gentle prod to remind everyone to include some metadata info when posting images.

Naturally the gallery will show such data, but the image is hosted outside of the gallery - tsk *laugh

Interested to know which lens was used, too.

Ian

theMusicMan
22nd October 2008, 07:29 AM
Aha... I see. I haven't taken my anti-stupidity pill this morning Ian... :) hehe

Ian
22nd October 2008, 07:30 AM
Having another look at this shot on my monitor here at the office, the dark areas have a reddish-brown cast. I wonder if I'd lift the black level to fix that. It would lose some detail in the dark, but I'm not sure if that would a problem for this scene?

Ian

Graham_of_Rainham
22nd October 2008, 10:14 AM
You have a good composition and have captured the atmosphere of the place very nicely.

Cropping the Left and right of the image may improve it but it's very much a matter of choice.

One thing to look out for next time with bright lights reflecting in water is that while you have nicely placed the bright light behind a brance of a tree to cut down the direct light into the lens, the reflection takes a different path and appears brighter than the light from the direct source. Unfortunatly it forms a distraction that draws the eye from the subject.

Another thing to consider with reflections, is to try them in portrate format and also to try giving prominence to the reflection.

This looks one of those places you could return to many times and drive yourself nuts playing with all sorts of compositions.

For me this is a really nice capture of the stillness of the moment and you've done a good job of portraying that.

Thanks for showing this.

Ellie
22nd October 2008, 12:20 PM
I like this.

The "reddish cast" - I wonder if it's caused by light that's going through a copper beech tree?

I have problems with night photography, always seem to get loads of brightly coloured pixels in the shot. I think caused by heat.

benvendetta
22nd October 2008, 01:04 PM
It gives off a very ghostly impression, which is nice. I agree that it should be cropped tighter but the best time of day for taking 'night' shots is whilst there is some retained colour in the sky (mid to dark blue for instance). This will give separation from the main subject and will add interest.

Dave

Napper
22nd October 2008, 01:12 PM
Thanks guys for the encouraging comments I'll try to answer the points raised.

Ian the lens is the Zuiko 12-60 swd.

As to the red/brown tinge I can just see it on my old crt monitor. I think that it is a result of the lights from the city behind the scene filtering through the trees (as Ellie said) causing a slight lightening of the dark night sky

Graham Yes I agree about the light reflection being distracting I should have toned it down using brightness /contrast in Elements.

As to cropping I did experiment with a few crops but all of them left me feeling that the picture was not balanced so I stuck with the original framing.

It really is a photogenic place and Imust resist the temptation to go back to often

Ellie I think you may be right about the colour cast coming through the trees. Thinking about your coloured lights on night photos is it possibly light bouncing of the rim of your lens (similar to what happens in strong sunlight if you face towards it) maybe try using a lens hood and see if this helps.

Anyway thanks guys

Ian
22nd October 2008, 01:18 PM
I like this.

The "reddish cast" - I wonder if it's caused by light that's going through a copper beech tree?

I have problems with night photography, always seem to get loads of brightly coloured pixels in the shot. I think caused by heat.

Are you using long exposures? If so, do you have noise reduction enabled? (not to be confused with noise filter).

Ian

Ellie
22nd October 2008, 10:20 PM
Are you using long exposures? If so, do you have noise reduction enabled? (not to be confused with noise filter).
Yes it is and :o I'm really not sure.

Nick Temple-Fry
23rd October 2008, 12:29 AM
Yes it is and :o I'm really not sure.

Noise reduction takes a second shot of the same length with the shutter closed, it then takes away any bright pixels getting rid of the constellations.

On the e-500 I found it very useful for any long exposure shots.

Nick

Ellie
23rd October 2008, 10:36 PM
Ah, OK, will mebbe talk about it on Saturday all being well. Thanks

grumpy69
25th October 2008, 08:37 PM
That is a really nice picture and the subject is smashing *clap

StephenL
27th October 2008, 11:40 AM
Only just seen this. I think it's an excellent shot - well composed and exposed. Very little to criticise.