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PeterD
8th October 2008, 03:45 PM
Newly emerged Peacocks are still on the wing down here and I thought this would make a good composition.

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/506/thumbs/Peacock_Butterfly_-_Inachis_io-084141.jpg (http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=8607)

I would appreciate your thoughts.

Peter

Makonde
9th October 2008, 07:59 AM
I like it because:
- the colours are soft and harmonious, giving a slightly watercolour effect
- the background is very nicely suppressed
- the composition was at risk of being dull and plonked in the middle, but the dynamic interplay between the angle of the butterfly and the tilt of the flower nicely offsets that (imagine how dull it would be with the flower stem vertical and the butterfly horizontal...)

So for me it's a good image that works. Pleasant to look at in a 'bug-on-flower' genre that can be overcrowded at times.

theMusicMan
9th October 2008, 09:38 AM
A very nice capture there Peter.

However, when I first looked at the image, it struck me that there was something... well, unusual about it - not wrong, not at all... just unusual, but I couldn't figure out what it was that was making me think this. I decided to make a cuppa and come back to it.

On my second visit I realised what it was, and of course this is just my opinion, most others I am sure will disagree with me, but I find the collection of main colours in this image a rather eclectic mix! There's brown, red, green and yellow, and I feel it's the background that makes me feel this way about the image. I have no suggestions as to what colour or effect on the background would be to avoid thinking this... but hey ho - each to their own eh!

Strange effect it is that some images have on folk eh!

PeterD
9th October 2008, 10:32 AM
Thanks John and Makonde for your replies and opinions. Thats why it was posted.

Peter

benvendetta
9th October 2008, 12:18 PM
I have no problem with the colour as it is what it is.
The best butterfly images show the whole width from wing tip to wing tip - all nice and sharp. Pleasing that this image is, to me it suffers from a lack of depth of field. The nearest wing tip with the lovely markings really needs to be in focus, along with its head (which is, here). This will always likely be a problem with images of butterflies from such an angle.

PeterD
9th October 2008, 01:32 PM
I have no problem with the colour as it is what it is.
The best butterfly images show the whole width from wing tip to wing tip - all nice and sharp. Pleasing that this image is, to me it suffers from a lack of depth of field. The nearest wing tip with the lovely markings really needs to be in focus, along with its head (which is, here). This will always likely be a problem with images of butterflies from such an angle.

Thank you. Some very good comments which deserve a reply.

I was trying to avoid the 'classic' images of wing tip to wing tip as we have seen enough of these on this site and I have plenty of them in my collection.

Rather, I was trying to make a composition rather than a technically accurate image. In this, the colours had to be complimentary, the thirds rule had to apply, avoidance of true horizontal and vertical and the background had to be soft to promote the foreground. No fiddling in PP to create washed backgrounds etc. It had to be as the camera produced it. After-all, thats what most of us are all trying to achieve. Those were my objectives.

The problem with dof is that if this was increased then the background would become clearer which would defeat the objective.

Hope this explains where I was coming from and why I introduced it as a composition.

Peter

art frames
9th October 2008, 06:44 PM
Peter

Very nice use of the bigma. I like the use of the narrow focus enabling you to lose the background and also get the body and the hair so sharp. If you catch those hairs in the right light they are very colourful.

The peacocks around here are confused too. It is a late and bright autumn (but no complaints for that). I have been on the canal today and seen red admirals and commas. Plus a rather splendid heron (at very close quarters too). I shall see if they are worth posting.

As for your peacock, I hope it gets plenty of stored body fat before finding a garage or shed for the winter. Then he will lift our spirits in the spring too.

best wishes

Peter

PeterD
9th October 2008, 06:56 PM
Peter

Very nice use of the bigma. I like the use of the narrow focus enabling you to lose the background and also get the body and the hair so sharp. If you catch those hairs in the right light they are very colourful.

The peacocks around here are confused too. It is a late and bright autumn (but no complaints for that). I have been on the canal today and seen red admirals and commas. Plus a rather splendid heron (at very close quarters too). I shall see if they are worth posting.

As for your peacock, I hope it gets plenty of stored body fat before finding a garage or shed for the winter. Then he will lift our spirits in the spring too.

best wishes

Peter


Thanks Peter.

I have tried to use the same effect on my recent bird images. Where the distance is relatively short, you can cash in on this effect. There are two themes I am now adopting, action shoots - usually at a distance and short distant shots where the subject is made to stand out. Taking shots with everything surrounding the subject in focus tends to be a distraction and I find it boring. If you cannot have action then you need something else to grab you.

Getting back to butterflies, I have been surprised at the quantity still on the wing. I do hope we do not get a sudden sharp frost before they find somewhere to hibernate.

Peter

benvendetta
9th October 2008, 07:31 PM
Thank you. Some very good comments which deserve a reply.

I was trying to avoid the 'classic' images of wing tip to wing tip as we have seen enough of these on this site and I have plenty of them in my collection.

Rather, I was trying to make a composition rather than a technically accurate image. In this, the colours had to be complimentary, the thirds rule had to apply, avoidance of true horizontal and vertical and the background had to be soft to promote the foreground. No fiddling in PP to create washed backgrounds etc. It had to be as the camera produced it. After-all, thats what most of us are all trying to achieve. Those were my objectives.

The problem with dof is that if this was increased then the background would become clearer which would defeat the objective.

Hope this explains where I was coming from and why I introduced it as a composition.

Peter

Actually, the idea of doing something different to the norm is commendable and as you rightly say, the 'conventional' way has been done to death rather. When I am judging around the clubs in south east Wales I am always stressing the need to 'look outside the box' and it is certainly something that I try and do as often as I can.

Dave

PeterD
9th October 2008, 07:44 PM
Actually, the idea of doing something different to the norm is commendable and as you rightly say, the 'conventional' way has been done to death rather. When I am judging around the clubs in south east Wales I am always stressing the need to 'look outside the box' and it is certainly something that I try and do as often as I can.

Dave

Thanks Dave for this reply. Please do not feel that what you said has in any way upset me - of course it has not:D

I deliberately posted this image in the 'Looking for perfection' forum to tease out opinions. I can learn from these as usually things that I have never thought about are drawn out.
The reason I described my objectives when taking the image was because it was not clear from my original post.

Cheers

Peter

Makonde
9th October 2008, 08:23 PM
Thank you. Some very good comments which deserve a reply.

I was trying to avoid the 'classic' images of wing tip to wing tip as we have seen enough of these on this site and I have plenty of them in my collection.

Rather, I was trying to make a composition rather than a technically accurate image. In this, the colours had to be complimentary, the thirds rule had to apply, avoidance of true horizontal and vertical and the background had to be soft to promote the foreground. No fiddling in PP to create washed backgrounds etc. It had to be as the camera produced it. After-all, thats what most of us are all trying to achieve. Those were my objectives.

The problem with dof is that if this was increased then the background would become clearer which would defeat the objective.

Hope this explains where I was coming from and why I introduced it as a composition.

Peter

This is convincing reasoning to me. It's an appealing and artistic image. There's a place for the crystal-clear wingtip to wingtip shots in entomology and photography textbooks but there's also a place for the 'essence of late summer butterfly' pictures, which this one nicely occupies.