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birdboy
16th March 2014, 07:54 PM
Not tried video on here before so bare with me.

M3150019 - YouTube

John

Zuiko
16th March 2014, 08:57 PM
That worked really well. *chr

Melaka
16th March 2014, 09:13 PM
Is there always a diesel banker for main line runs?

birdboy
16th March 2014, 10:04 PM
Is there always a diesel banker for main line runs?

I'm not a steam buff but from what I gather only when they cannot turn the train round. The 7000 Britannia was kept at Southall and Southend Victoria line (end of line) has no means of turning the engine around, so it was towed backwards all the way from Southall to Southend. Its destination was Sailsbury and I understand that they can turn the engine round using something called a Wyetrack, something like a triangle with curved track sides. The Brantannia did not steam back to Southend but only to Willesden where I presume it returned to its shed and told the other engines about its day.:D Last year I saw the 70013 Oliver Cromwell go down the Eat Coast line and there was no banker on that train. This is what started me on looing for main line steam local to me.

Melaka
17th March 2014, 08:04 AM
That makes sense. Until they rebuilt Marylebone station a decade or more ago there was a turntable so the Chiltern line was popular with steam trains.

Bikie John
17th March 2014, 12:22 PM
Its destination was Sailsbury and I understand that they can turn the engine round using something called a Wyetrack, something like a triangle with curved track sides.

Here is the Wiki page about Wye tracks - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wye_(rail) . Presumably it gets its name from the Y shape of the layout.

The Laverstock Loop, close to Salisbury, is just such a junction. Here it is on Google maps - https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@51.0753836,-1.7910363,15z

I don't know how to flag the particular bit, it is the triangle of lines just above Chafyn Grove School to the north-east of Salisbury centre. To the left (west) is Salisbury, the line going out top right (north-east) is the main line from Salisbury to London and the one heading southwards is from Salisbury to Southampton. The third (eastern) side of the triangle is not in regular use. I think they keep it because it provides a diversionary route from Southampton to Basingstoke and London for when the main line through Winchester is not available. It also has the benefit of being able to reverse trains, which may possibly be why we get steam excursions down here.

You all wanted to know that, didn't you :) Thanks John for mentioning it, I had never heard the term before.

John

DerekW
17th March 2014, 12:56 PM
How do they minimise friction in the steam engine when it is being dragged along in reverse - ok they can lift any valves so the cylinders are not pressurised but I would it to be a more draggy load than a wagon of similar weight. I would expect the return speed would be much slower.

Bikie John
17th March 2014, 02:20 PM
I think steam engines can go backwards Derek, just not very fast. But that's good enough for the odd bit of shunting or running round a reversing loop. From what I remember on the line between Corfe Castle and Swanage they don't turn the loco round, and it always faces Corfe Castle.

John

DerekW
17th March 2014, 02:29 PM
I know they run in reverse, my concern is when they are being towed home - or are they under steam to assist the diesel engine that is pulling the train. Ditto does the diesel help push the train when the train is beiing pulled by the steam engine.

birdboy
17th March 2014, 02:33 PM
How do they minimise friction in the steam engine when it is being dragged along in reverse - ok they can lift any valves so the cylinders are not pressurised but I would it to be a more draggy load than a wagon of similar weight. I would expect the return speed would be much slower.

I watched the engine being 'towed' backwards on its way to its start point. It was under steam and I assume assisting the diesel unit pulling it. I have little knowledge of steam engines other than once having a Mamod stationary steam engine but have always assumed the principles of steam driven power is the same which ever way you drive the wheels, you stick the steam in at the other end of the piston, double acting.

Here is a vid of it on its way to its start point. I unfortunately stopped videoing a bit too early (trying to use 2 cameras at once em1 & E5) but you can just hear the steam working as she passes.

M3150009v - YouTube

StephenL
17th March 2014, 04:52 PM
That takes me back! I used to see Britannia going through Wigan North-Western when I was nobbut a nipper in shorts!

birdboy
17th March 2014, 05:44 PM
You are well placed to see the many main line steam trips out of London. Check out the timetable if you want to add to your nostalgia with the sight smell and real sound of steam. There is the 6007 Sir Nigel Gresley leaving London Kings Cross this coming Saturday.

http://www.uksteam.info/tours/trs14.htm

John

Anne
17th March 2014, 08:50 PM
I like your video...there is something special about seeing and hearing a steam train go past you...even if you are not an anarak!

I've been on a few steam trips recently, taking my dad as part of his 80th birthday present. We have been pulled by the Oliver Cromwell, Union of South Africa and also the Scots Guardsman. We also visited the recent class A4. Exhibition at Shildon although it was mobbed so not good for photos!

We had a Class 47 diesel with us on the Oliver Cromwell trip but not with the Scots Guardsman. And the few times I've seen the U of SA it has not had a diesel back up. I assume it is something to do with Network Rail as they are really strict with steam engines on their lines imposing huge fines if they don't keep to the schedule. So having the diesel may be partly down to conditions imposed, the line side fire risk when a steam train has to work harder on an uphill gradient and also a rescue operation as I'm not sure whether the old carriages/braking systems can be operated by modern trains. I think there is also something to do with the steam engine passing points at the end of the line/barrier and not being able to go back over them. I don't really have much knowledge but the enthusiasts on the trips gave out loads of information and I listened to some before getting bored and switching off!

However it was harder than I thought to get good photos of the steam trains and now it has become something of a quest to get better at it :)

birdboy
17th March 2014, 09:37 PM
Thank you Anne. I am getting to know more engines and yours seem to be a really good list. While waiting it seems that you do get to meet some interesting people. I share your thought on how difficult it is to get good pictures. I thought it would be easier that I am finding it. I forget to do things I had thought about and then the moments gone never to return. Not like birding where they sometimes come back or bike racing where they come round again (usually). I had the 9-18mm lens on the EM1 for the first pass on its way to its starting point and then when the train passed within 10ft of me I forgot to un-zoom to 9mm.